Classic Coconut Macaroons

Author:
Publish date:
Social count:
178

What is the difference between macaroons and macarons?

The charming, French almond-flour, sandwich cookie called the Macaron is actually an Italian confection created during the 9th century. Italian Jews adopted the cookie because it did not contain flour and could be eaten during Passover. Later, coconut and nuts were added to the recipe and in some versions potato starch and almond paste are added giving the macaroons more body. Get the recipe for French Macarons here. 

The Coconut Macaroon is a French favorite and called Rochers Coco. My favorite version has a crispy exterior with a chewy and tender heart. While forming half moons is perfectly acceptable, the pyramid shape is not only perfect for Passover, but yields the best texture.

coconut macaroons
  • Duration
  • Cook Time
  • Prep Time
  • 24 CookiesServings

Ingredients

Coconut Macaroon

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 cups unsweetened shredded coconut (also called desiccated coconut)
  • 3 egg whites lightly beaten just until foamy
  • 1 vanilla bean, split in half lengthwise and seeds scraped out
  • ½ teaspoon kosher or sea salt

Chocolate Dip

  • 7 ounces bittersweet chocolate, chopped

Preparation

Coconut Macaroon:

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Line 2 baking sheets with parchment.

2. Add sugar, coconut, egg whites, scraped vanilla bean and salt to a medium bowl and stir together with a spatula to combine.

3. Scoop 2 to 3 teaspoons of batter and form a pyramid with your fingers, or a half moon works fine.

4. Refrigerate macaroons for 15 minutes.

5. Bake at 350°F for 15 to 20 minutes until golden brown. (Macaroons go from pale to burned in seconds, so don’t wander away.)

6. Remove from oven and set macaroons aside to cool for 15 minutes before dipping in chocolate.

Chocolate Dip:

1. Melt chocolate in a double boiler, or in microwave with short blasts of 20 seconds, then stirring before more cook time.

2. Dip bottom of macaroon in melted chocolate and then place back on parchment. Chill to set chocolate. Transfer to a platter to serve.