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Caramelized Onion Mashed Potatoes

 

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Fallen Chocolate Souffle Cake

 

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Shabbat Menu – Asparagus In A Blanket &...

 

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Floating across the Nile river in a reed basket, a newborn baby boy is spared certain death.  In time, Moshe will move heaven and earth to bring the Jewish people out of slavery and towards the Promised Land and his name will be immortalized for eternity.  But not yet.  This parsha is about hiddenness. From being concealed by his mother Yocheved after his birth to avoid detection by Pharaoh’s midwives, to being shrouded in a basket for his safety, to running in hiding after his defense of the Hebrew slaves, to hearing the voice of Hashem from a Burning Bush, the demand for justice and righteousness doesn’t always shout, it whispers and it is up to us to reveal what is inside. Many people have the custom of marking this week’s parsha by eating Hot Dogs in a Blanket, appropriately called, Moshe Ba’Teiva (Moshe in the Ark).  I am going to recommend a healthier variation that I’ve been making for years, asparagus wrapped in dough — A perfect parsha-friendly appetizer that is destined to become a family favorite. This week we start the book of Shemot and many people have the custom of eating


 

Chicken Thighs with Roasted Winter Fruit

 

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Quinoa with Fried Onions and Chestnuts

 

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Coconut Panna Cotta with Lime Curd

 

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Shabbat Menu – Fall Off Bone Lamb Shanks

 

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The Book of Genesis is our story of creation.  As we reach Vayechi (“and he lived”) we turn from the hopeful anticipation of life that greeted us during the opening chapters of the first book, to a reflective, contemplative awareness that we are not immortal and we are judged by what we do during our brief stay on earth.  The death of Jacob and the return of his bones to the Holy Land marks the end of the lives of the patriarchs.  The death of Joseph, with the resulting vow to take his bones from Egypt to the Promised Land, ushers in an era of harsh slavery and oppression, but ultimately redemption.  This week we’ll take bones and transform our Shabbat meal into a celebration of all things meat.

Lo Mein

Not Your Grandma


 

Not Your Grandma’s Chicken Soup

 

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Sweet Potato and Carrot Bake

 

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Pumpkin Chai Cupcakes

 

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Shabbat Menu – Butternut Squash Soup with...

 

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Revealing himself to his palace guests as their long lost brother, Joseph brings together the Children of Israel.  The emotional reunion is complete when Jacob brings the rest of his family from the Holy Land to settle in Goshen.  The Jews stand out in Goshen, growing in numbers and wealth.  It is said that during the famine, Joseph sustained his father and his brothers and their entire household with bread.  I can’t think of a better way to sustain our Shabbat guests either – you’ll love this savory Butternut Squash Soup with Orange Croutons and a decadent Gingerbread Eggnog Bread Pudding Muffins for dessert.

 


 

Cranberry Chicken

 

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Portobello Mushroom and Spinach Quinoa

 

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Gingerbread Eggnog Bread Pudding

 

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Shabbat Menu – The Reliable Roast

 

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Pharaoh dreams of seven fat cows swallowed by seven emaciated cows, and then seven fat stalks of grain swallowed by seven lean stalks of grain.  In one of Joseph’s most evocative interpretations, the forgotten prisoner predicts seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine.  As we plunge deeper into the harsh cold winter, we’d better stir things up with a hearty Shabbat Mikeitz meal sporting a variety of wild grains and a big, fat juicy steak.

Warm Kamut Salad with Caramelized Squash and Cranberry Fig Chutney

Warm Kamut Salad with Caramelized Squash and Cranberry Fig Chutney