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6 Summer Party Appetizers *Giveaway*

 

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I love a good party.  But easy laid back open house style entertaining.  Which I find perfect for summer.

I recently hosted (together with Nefesh B’Nefesh) my own Goodbye BBQ.  But the kicker, as I have oft complained here for the last few weeks, is that my kitchen contents are all packed up on a lift and anything that was left I gave away in haste forgetting that I had 4 weeks left to feed my family.  So with only a stockpot a HUGE serrated bread knife and oversized cutting board to my name I hosted a party for a hundred and do what I was brought up to do… made my momma proud and called the caterer.


 

Preparing To Move with 6 Israeli Recipes *Giveaway...

 

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I am moving.  Have you heard?  I know it’s hard to ignore something I am shouting from every roof top but as usual I can’t help myself.  Well let me tell you as I have told anyone who will listen I have but a pot, a cutting board and a rusted bread knife plus a bunch of fancy once-a-year serving platters to my name in my NY kitchen.  So cooking has been a more difficult than usual challenge.  But surprisingly while not pretty to watch I can get a respectable slice and dice out of my overgrown serrated bread knife.  So in honor of my aliyah to the Holy Land I share my favorite Israeli Salatim (translate: salads) that I really should practice in anticipation of my arrival.  When I get there I bet my Israeli-Iraqi sis-in-law will surely tell me I am doing these all wrong, but until then they are authentic in my book.

israeli chopped salad

Israeli Salad


 

Cook Once, Eat Twice – Chicken!

 

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Leftover chicken can be a pain, but it doesn’t have to be.  Instead it can be another easy weeknight dinner.

(more…)


 

5 One Bowl Pasta Dinners

 

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Thirty-minute dinners that let you feed your pasta craving and still step lightly on that scale.

These five one-bowl pasta dinners are quick, easy, and satisfy every pasta-lover’s craving. I love just about every version of pasta, and I’ve discovered ways to indulge even when I’m “watching” what I eat. So don’t let the “P” word scare you. If you’re careful with portion size, enhance the meal with vegetables and healthy lean proteins, and use whole wheat, brown rice, or soba noodle varieties to enjoy these fab five dinners without a care!


 

The Making of a Cookbook # 4 – Photography

 

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So as I sit here and twiddle my fingers trying to guess what I should write about, what you want to know, what may be of interest, Tali was kind enough to post a question (you go Tali!  both for the Q and your gorgeous Kachol v’ Lavan Cheesecakes!).

Question From Tali:
I’d love to hear more about the photo shoots…
Do they take place in your home?
Over how many days?
Do you have everything pre-cooked?
Are hot dishes photographed hot?
Is it your job to have extra ingredients around for styling?
Also, why is this the most expensive part — doesn’t the publisher pay for that?


 

Six A La Minute Shavuot Brunch Recipes

 

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Quick & Kosher 20 minute prep. There’s something for everyone at this perfect Shavuos brunch. Use “à la minute” techniques to individualize delectable breakfast cuisine.

After a night of Torah learning, a fresh breakfast hits the spot. This is the time for à la minute fare. In the culinary arts (which always sounded to me like painting with ketchup), à la minute refers to a style of cooking where an item, or particularly its accompanying sauce, is prepared to order, rather than prepped in advance.  You can make elements of this breakfast à la minute, and prep some ahead of time, so you are not at the stove while everyone else is enjoying the yuntif feast. It has some savory dishes, sweet sides, southwestern influences, and a little smoked salmon for good measure.


 

For The Love of Rhubarb

 

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It was about 5 years ago that I was talking to Ruthie, my friend in the neighborhood, and she was going on an on an on about Rhubarb.  How she loved it and makes kugels and pies and G-d only knows what else.  Well  I was flabbergasted to say the least.  I mean who eats rhubarb?  I always saw it in the freezer section but just passed it over like soup on a hot day.  So nowadays I am a lot more adventurous. That coupled with the fact that Ruthie doesn’t much seem the adventurous cooking type – gave me the courage to try this peculiar plant in my cooking.


 

Celebrating Israel Independence Day

 

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This year Yom HaAtzmaut is on Thursday, April 26, 2012.

So, probably you wanna know what I’m gonna make.  It’s not like Shavuos where I wait for an excuse to make cheesecake, I don’t really wait for Yom HaAtzmaut to make Israeli food.  Hummus and Tahina are staples in our house – we eat them with everything from chicken nuggets, to pizza and on salads.  Other middle eastern dips like Turkish salad and babaganoush are slathered in between butterflied potato borekas or smothered on spicy beef cigars weekly at our shabbos table and we eat falafel like it’s going out of style.


 

The Making of a Cookbook #3

 

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Editing, Editing and More Editing.

The most unglamorous and laborious part to writing a cookbook is the editing, specifically the recipe editing. There are so many styles to recipe writing, think about it like decorating, and no way is better than the other but each publishing house, or publication, or website (I am sure you are getting the point) has a style sheet. Now, much like morning sickness, which is not confined to the the AM hours, a style sheet is not really a single piece of paper but something closer in size to a small book. It details all the “house rules” for writing. And goes through the painful process of listing the mundane to obscure.


 

Seven Perfect Recipes for your Passover Meal

 

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Most cooks are stumped when it comes to menu planning for an important event. What’s the best starter? How to pair mains with sides? And yuntif is your ultimate culinary performance. The stage is set, the audience is seated at your table, the curtain rises, and the spotlight is on you.

Chill. Those folks around your table are not food critics from the New York Times; they’re just your family and friends. And you’ll be a star because we’ve done all the planning for you: every course in this elegant coordinated meal perfectly combines flavors, textures, and colors. Just serve and bow to the applause.


 

15 Minute Prep Passover Meals

 

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Enhance your Yom Tov meal without spending all day in the kitchen.

Passover is known to old-timers as a “Kitchen Yuntif,” but that doesn’t mean we must be chained to our stoves for a whole week. Slavery, my friends, is over — gone forever since the exodus! Our Festival of Freedom is no time to enslave ourselves, even if we’re scheduled to serve up 10 banquets in eight days, not to mention K for P lunches and snacks.


 

Jamie’s Greatest Passover Hits

 

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I can’t believe it.

Really I am in total denial.  Although I did tell my 2 year old — who doesn’t listen much anyway — not to run around the house with a slice of bread in his hand.


 

The Making of A Cookbook Part #1

 

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The rumors are true. I am working on my 3rd book, thank G-d.

I have done many things in my life both personally and professionally. But writing a cookbook is one of the single most difficult of them all.


 

My Most Memorable Purim

 

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My most memorable Purim is a scary scene.  Me with about 60 quarts of soup and 24 pounds of challah dough, crying like a baby at 2AM.
Let me explain.

When we moved to Monsey 5 years ago I really wanted to make a splash that first Purim.  The community had been so warm and welcoming and I really wanted to show my appreciation, by making all 60 families (or most of them) mishloach manos.  Since I didn’t grow up in a family that made mishloach manos, or much of anything in the kitchen, when I first got married I frantically attempted to pull something together, at the last minute, only after my husband reminded me Purim was tomorrow.  So I borrowed a page from my friend Anita’s book and bought every purple food I could find left on the supermarket shelf through it all in a bag and attached a card wishing everyone a “Grape Purim.”  Boy was I ever proud of myself.  No really, I was proud.


 

Gefilte Fish Recipes

 

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At most events I do, inevitably a woman comes up to me with a story.

She speaks of inheriting her grandmother’s gefilte fish recipe or some other such occurrence that leads her to following the directions of an old time version with the first instruction being: