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Joy of Aliyah – The Finale – Living...

 

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Thank you to everyone for sharing this journey with us.  There was no way for us to know how many of you would be touched by this series and surprisingly how meaningful and helpful your comments have been.  To all of you who have taken the time to express your feelings, in writing through comments, tweets and blog posts  – you must know, and I can’t say it enough times – what strength it has given us as a family.  This one experience has drawn us all (and I mean you, my Joy of Kosher/Aliyah Family) closer and for that I will be forever grateful.  I will do my utmost to continue to share our experiences here on JoyofKosher.com through blog posts, recipes and videos so that we may all live the dream together.  While this is the finale episode, I promise you this is not the end… it is only the beginning.

With love and best wishes for a Great Shabbos and a Gmar Chasima Tova
Jamie and Family


 

Honey Sesame Glazed Chicken – Honey Recipe...

 

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Honey is the most universal symbol of Rosh Hashanah.  As everyone looks to wish one another a Sweet New Year.  We take that phrase for granted as we have heard it so many times over for so many years running but it is such a beautiful wish.  We use adjectives like good and great and wonderful to describe experiences, hopes and dreams but sweet is a quite beautiful word, for me, it conveys something more than the commonly used positive adjective, it conveys something warm, something homey.

Date and Honey Glazed Chicken Thighs

Date and Honey Glazed Chicken Thighs


 

Five-Ingredient Dinners Go From Everyday to...

 

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Dress them up, or dress them down—these dishes do double duty for either a holiday or weeknight meal.

We all have our go-to recipes that are easy, foolproof crowd-pleasers. Now you’ll have even more. These recipes use only 5 ingredients—doesn’t get much simpler than that—for weeknight family dinners. But I’ll also show you how a simple presentation tweak, garnish, or an extra ingredient or two can dress ‘em up for Yom Tov.  (And no, salt, pepper, oil, water, and cooking spray don’t count as ingredients.)  I promise these will become part of your tried & true recipe inventory, and now they’ll do double duty as everyday or holiday dishes.


 

A Simanim Filled Menu For Rosh Hashanah

 

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Simanim Inspired – Taste your way into a blessed new year.

Simanin (literally signs or indicators) are foods that we eat on Rosh Hashanah to symbolize our hopes for the coming year. I like to work simanim into my Rosh Hashanah recipes for the added blessing, sweetness, and mazal they represent.  This menu is exquisite in its simplicity and great-tasting dishes.


 

I Make the BBQ Sauce *Kosher Recipe Linkup*

 

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I don’t really grill. Except when it comes to interrogating Hubby.  I leave the actual BBQ to the experts.  My Hubby and BFF Anita (Rabbi Lawrence’sbetter half) are the grill masters on the block.  Come to think of it, in Anita’s house she’s not only the griller (yes, I realize that’s not really a proper word), she’s also the garbage taker outer and the driver and the discipliner (yup, I know that’s not correct either… but it flows). Rabbi L just sits and is served, plays good cop with the kids and rides shotgun while she chauffeurs him around town. But she loves it.  Anita and Hubby are twins separated at birth.  Come to think of it Rabbi L and I are quite similar (aside from the facial hair of course — I will admit to having NONE!).

Peach BBQ Sauce

Peach BBQ Sauce


 

6 Summer Party Appetizers *Giveaway*

 

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I love a good party.  But easy laid back open house style entertaining.  Which I find perfect for summer.

I recently hosted (together with Nefesh B’Nefesh) my own Goodbye BBQ.  But the kicker, as I have oft complained here for the last few weeks, is that my kitchen contents are all packed up on a lift and anything that was left I gave away in haste forgetting that I had 4 weeks left to feed my family.  So with only a stockpot a HUGE serrated bread knife and oversized cutting board to my name I hosted a party for a hundred and do what I was brought up to do… made my momma proud and called the caterer.


 

Preparing To Move with 6 Israeli Recipes *Giveaway...

 

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I am moving.  Have you heard?  I know it’s hard to ignore something I am shouting from every roof top but as usual I can’t help myself.  Well let me tell you as I have told anyone who will listen I have but a pot, a cutting board and a rusted bread knife plus a bunch of fancy once-a-year serving platters to my name in my NY kitchen.  So cooking has been a more difficult than usual challenge.  But surprisingly while not pretty to watch I can get a respectable slice and dice out of my overgrown serrated bread knife.  So in honor of my aliyah to the Holy Land I share my favorite Israeli Salatim (translate: salads) that I really should practice in anticipation of my arrival.  When I get there I bet my Israeli-Iraqi sis-in-law will surely tell me I am doing these all wrong, but until then they are authentic in my book.

israeli chopped salad

Israeli Salad


 

Cook Once, Eat Twice – Chicken!

 

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Leftover chicken can be a pain, but it doesn’t have to be.  Instead it can be another easy weeknight dinner.

(more…)


 

5 One Bowl Pasta Dinners

 

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Thirty-minute dinners that let you feed your pasta craving and still step lightly on that scale.

These five one-bowl pasta dinners are quick, easy, and satisfy every pasta-lover’s craving. I love just about every version of pasta, and I’ve discovered ways to indulge even when I’m “watching” what I eat. So don’t let the “P” word scare you. If you’re careful with portion size, enhance the meal with vegetables and healthy lean proteins, and use whole wheat, brown rice, or soba noodle varieties to enjoy these fab five dinners without a care!


 

The Making of a Cookbook # 4 – Photography

 

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So as I sit here and twiddle my fingers trying to guess what I should write about, what you want to know, what may be of interest, Tali was kind enough to post a question (you go Tali!  both for the Q and your gorgeous Kachol v’ Lavan Cheesecakes!).

Question From Tali:
I’d love to hear more about the photo shoots…
Do they take place in your home?
Over how many days?
Do you have everything pre-cooked?
Are hot dishes photographed hot?
Is it your job to have extra ingredients around for styling?
Also, why is this the most expensive part — doesn’t the publisher pay for that?


 

Six A La Minute Shavuot Brunch Recipes

 

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Quick & Kosher 20 minute prep. There’s something for everyone at this perfect Shavuos brunch. Use “à la minute” techniques to individualize delectable breakfast cuisine.

After a night of Torah learning, a fresh breakfast hits the spot. This is the time for à la minute fare. In the culinary arts (which always sounded to me like painting with ketchup), à la minute refers to a style of cooking where an item, or particularly its accompanying sauce, is prepared to order, rather than prepped in advance.  You can make elements of this breakfast à la minute, and prep some ahead of time, so you are not at the stove while everyone else is enjoying the yuntif feast. It has some savory dishes, sweet sides, southwestern influences, and a little smoked salmon for good measure.


 

For The Love of Rhubarb

 

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It was about 5 years ago that I was talking to Ruthie, my friend in the neighborhood, and she was going on an on an on about Rhubarb.  How she loved it and makes kugels and pies and G-d only knows what else.  Well  I was flabbergasted to say the least.  I mean who eats rhubarb?  I always saw it in the freezer section but just passed it over like soup on a hot day.  So nowadays I am a lot more adventurous. That coupled with the fact that Ruthie doesn’t much seem the adventurous cooking type – gave me the courage to try this peculiar plant in my cooking.


 

Celebrating Israel Independence Day

 

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This year Yom HaAtzmaut is on Thursday, April 26, 2012.

So, probably you wanna know what I’m gonna make.  It’s not like Shavuos where I wait for an excuse to make cheesecake, I don’t really wait for Yom HaAtzmaut to make Israeli food.  Hummus and Tahina are staples in our house – we eat them with everything from chicken nuggets, to pizza and on salads.  Other middle eastern dips like Turkish salad and babaganoush are slathered in between butterflied potato borekas or smothered on spicy beef cigars weekly at our shabbos table and we eat falafel like it’s going out of style.


 

The Making of a Cookbook #3

 

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Editing, Editing and More Editing.

The most unglamorous and laborious part to writing a cookbook is the editing, specifically the recipe editing. There are so many styles to recipe writing, think about it like decorating, and no way is better than the other but each publishing house, or publication, or website (I am sure you are getting the point) has a style sheet. Now, much like morning sickness, which is not confined to the the AM hours, a style sheet is not really a single piece of paper but something closer in size to a small book. It details all the “house rules” for writing. And goes through the painful process of listing the mundane to obscure.


 

Seven Perfect Recipes for your Passover Meal

 

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Most cooks are stumped when it comes to menu planning for an important event. What’s the best starter? How to pair mains with sides? And yuntif is your ultimate culinary performance. The stage is set, the audience is seated at your table, the curtain rises, and the spotlight is on you.

Chill. Those folks around your table are not food critics from the New York Times; they’re just your family and friends. And you’ll be a star because we’ve done all the planning for you: every course in this elegant coordinated meal perfectly combines flavors, textures, and colors. Just serve and bow to the applause.