Menu Of the Week

 

Shabbat Menu For The Ten Commandments

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

In this week’s parsha, Yistro, the Israelites stand at the foot of Mount Sinai.  We witness thunder, lightning, smoke and the sound of the shofar and experience the declaration of the 10 Commandments.  This week’s Shabbat menu will also come as a revelation to many.  It did to me.  I attended a cooking class in Italy and learned a traditional Libyan recipe that is said to resemble Mount Sinai and is frequently served on Shavuot.  I thought it was a most appropriate dish to enjoy this Shabbat.  It is rustic and comfort food in the middle of February.  And you might just hear the following ten utterances from your guests: Please can I have some more this dish is delish!

 


 

Shabbat Menu – Water, Water Everywhere

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

In parshat Beshalach time is running out. Pharaoh and his army are chasing after the Israelites and they stop at the edge of the Red Sea.  There is no place left to go.  After witnessing the miraculous signs and wonders that brought Egypt to its knees, fear and doubt begin to consume the former slaves.  After Hashem chastises Moses for timidity in the face of adversity, Moses bravely raises his hands. The waters split and we cross a free people, while Pharaoh and his army drown in the sea. This parsha is all about water – an element bringing salvation and destruction.  As the Israelites continue in the desert, bitter waters are transformed and made potable.  Then later, hunger and thirst overtake the Jews and their complaints lead Moses to strike the rock, a transgression that will ultimately cost him a chance to lead the Jews to the Promised Land.  With this week’s Shabbat menu, we celebrate water, but we don’t forget to include a little bitterness, a reminder of our journey along time ago.

Water Challah

Water Challah


 

Shabbat Menu – Easiest Roasted Lamb

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

In this week’s parsha Bo, we witness the final three plagues against Egypt.  In preparation for the final plague, the Children of Israel are commanded to sacrifice a lamb and sprinkle blood on their doorposts.  When we commemorate the Exodus on Seder night, we have a tradition to refrain from eating roast meat or lamb so that it does not appear that we are trying to replace the Paschal lamb.  Since Passover is still months away and lamb has a starring role this week, we decided to try a six-ingredient Roasted Lamb with Lemon Potatoes that is going to turn heads this Shabbos.

vegetable barley soup

Vegetable Barley Soup


 

Shabbat Menu – An Italian Feast

 

Contributed by:

 

7 comments | Leave Comment

 

In parsha Va’era, it is a remarkable scene in ancient Egypt.  Moses and Aaron standing before Pharaoh in his court.  The brothers are there to redeem the Jewish people and they know their opponent will not bend easily.  The plagues will soon follow, but for the moment it is just Moses and Aaron alone with Pharaoh in the palace of the king. It is this moment when Moses and Aaron throw their staffs to the ground and issue their challenge to Egypt. This week, our Shabbat meal begins with its own symbol to recall that historic summit.  We start with handmade Herbed Focaccia – Italian bread that present a challenge to anyone at your table.  How can you possibly resist this delicious treat?

Red Mullet with Pine Nuts and Raisins


 

Shabbat Menu with Dim Sum Baskets

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

In Parsha Shemot, we are bent but not broken, the Jewish people persevere despite the cruelty of Pharaoh.  In this week’sparsha, we witness the birth of Moses, the agent of our redemption.  Moses floats along the Nile river in a reed basket, rescued by the kindness of Pharaoh’s daughter.  For this week’s Shabbat menu, discover our Dim Sum Baskets – easy to make, hard to resist.

 


 

Shabbat Menu With A Sweet Beginning

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

In parsha Vayechi, Jacob’s days draw to a close, he gathers Joseph and his children, Ephraim and Manasseh, for a blessing that we include every Friday night for our sons.  Jacob reverses the traditional order and raises the younger son before the older, once again upsetting the traditional birthright.   Despite weary eyes, Jacob’s vision sees beyond the natural order of things.  We all know dessert typically follows a meal and you will never over hear a parent say: “eat your dessert and then you can have dinner” – except on this Shabbat.  This week we start our Shabbos meal off with a Chocolate Chip Challah Bread that will bring the sweet taste of the end of the meal to the beginning.  Like Jacob, we like to turn things around sometimes, too.

Butternut Squash Soup


 

Shabbat Menu with Blondies

 

Contributed by:

 

3 comments | Leave Comment

 

In Parsha Vayigash Joseph reveals himself to his brothers in one of the most emotional scenes in our entire Torah and sets into motion a series of fateful steps that will determine the destiny of the Jewish people.  The famine has brought the land of Egypt to its knees. Joseph asks his brothers to bring the entire family to the land of Goshen to sustain them during the remaining years of famine.  With wagons filled with the best grains, produce and food from Egypt and an inspiring revelation from Hashem, Jacob loads a lifetime of memories into the waiting wagons and descends to Egypt.  This week our Shabbat menu is designed to travel lightly.  Whether you are Shabbat guests, or visiting friends or family during the time of year when many of us are off of school or work, we share some favorites that can be wrapped, packed, stacked and reheated to perfection.

Roasted Cauliflower Soup


 

Shabbat Menu – Vayeshev

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Sheaves of wheat in the field.  And eleven sheaves bow down to a single one.  Oh, Joseph! What are we going to do with you?  It must be some very impressive wholewheat. Now, I don’t expect anyone to have to bow down to get the recipe for a perfect whole wheat bread. But try this Artichoke Wheat Berry Salad at your Shabbat table and they just might beg for it.

Curried Squash Soup with Frizzled Leeks


 

Shabbat Menu – Angel Food Trifle

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

This is the reckoning. Esau is approaching with his entourage. To protect against an attack, Jacob divides his camp and stays on the other side of the Jabbok.

Jacob has accumulated great wealth and numbers.  But tonight he is all alone.  Jacob wrestles with an angel till dawn.  And although the match ends in a stalemate, Jacob emerges with a blessing, a new identity and a new destiny.  So tonight we dine with Jacob on the side of the angels.  This Strawberry Angel Food Trifle is a soulful dish, in the light of day or dark of night.


 

Shabbat Menu – Jacob’s Ladder Lamb...

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

When we first encounter Jacob at the beginning of this parsha, he is a fugitive. Jacob is fleeing the wrath of Esau following the theft of his brother’s birthright and seeks comfort and peace in Haran. When he leaves the land of his fathers, Jacob is a wealthy man, changed by time and circumstances to become the father of a great nation.

What is his secret? It starts with faith and it ends with lamb. Inspired by the vision of the ladder and angels, Jacob sees a future of great hope and promise. He meets Laban and learns the ways of the shepherd. It is his success that merits the marriage to Leah and Rachel. When Laban continues his pattern of doublecross and doublespeak, Jacob doubles down, too. Jacob bargains for his share of the flock and his household and livestock multiply exceedingly. It seems fitting to celebrate this Shabbat with lamb. I love the simplicity of the presentation and how the layered skewers evoke the steps of Jacob’s ladder to heaven.


 

Shabbat Menu – Red Lentil Stew

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

Each year when we arrive at this parsha, I try to make the perfect pottage.  This year, I think I found it.  Jacob must have been a great cook, creating a lentil dish so aromatic that Esau would cast off his birthright like a raincoat.  Here is my best try.  Feast your senses on this remarkable red lentil soup, that will take the chill off a cold fall night and fire up your Shabbos table with a simmering serrano pepper.

Red Lentil Soup


 

Shabbat Menu – Pineapple Upside Cake

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

The courtship of Rebecca is remarkable to watch unfold.  In this week’s parsha, Abraham makes his servant swear to find a bride from among his kinsmen and Eliezer meets a most appropriate match with the beautiful and kind daughter of Abraham’s brother, Nahor.   Eliezer consecrates the auspicious meeting by giving rings and bracelets to Rebecca.  And after the marriage proposal is accepted by Rebecca’s family, an engagement party is enjoyed by all.  The Torah notes the silver and gold bestowed on Rebecca and the delicious fruits given to Rebecca’s brother and mother.  So to celebrate this happy occasion, we take inspiration from Eliezer with a dessert featuring Bacardi Silver Rum and golden pineapple for a most delicious Pineapple Upside Down Cake.

Collard Green and Hummus Mini-Wraps

Collard Green and Hummus Mini-Wraps


 

Shabbat Menu – Bedouin Tent Style

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Abraham and Sarah were a model of hospitality and kindness.  In the sweltering heat of the desert, their tent was a place of shade and sustenance. The memory of my overnight in a Bedouin tent will stay with me forever. The stars so close you can reach out and touch them… and the food.  Sweet tea, freshly made pita, tender meat kabobs and delicate seasoned rice. Almost makes you want to eat on the floor this week. Wherever you choose to enjoy this Bedouin-inspired feast, you will be dining like the angels.

 


 

Shabbat Menu – Kreplach and Surprises

 

Contributed by:

 

3 comments | Leave Comment

 

Lech Lecha, tracing the journey of Abraham from his birthplace to his homeland, is about the hidden and revealed.  From hiding the identity of his wife, Sara, from his neighbors, to the unfulfilled promise of a nation, much is given to Abraham, yet the reason for his chosenness remains a mystery.  This week we celebrate Shabbat with kreplach, a traditional Jewish Shabbat food that appropriately conceals its true essence.  Kreplach is a reminder that sometimes food, like the world around us, needs to be opened up to be experienced.  (There is a surprise kreplach for dessert too.)

Chicken Soup with Kreplach


 

Shabbat Menu – Quick and Easy Shabbat Dinner

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Whenever I get tired at the end of a long week, I take a moment to think about all that Hashem did in six days and I don’t feel quite so tired anymore.  But by the end of three (that’s right, three) 3-day Yom Tovim (including Shabbos), I bet Jewish cooks everywhere are ready to take it a little easier in the kitchen this week.  In Parsha Bereishit, we read about the creation of the world and the expulsion from the Garden of Eden.  While the forbidden fruit remains a mystery, I did find an easy to prepare Shabbat menu that showcases a cornucopia of savory herbs and seasonal vegetables surrounding a tasty roast chicken that will satisfy family and friends and takes less than an hour out of the last day of yom tov to prepare.