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Leeks and Fennel in Anise Vinaigrette

 

 

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Leeks and Fennel in Anise Vinaigrette Posted 02/10/2015 by The Gefiltefest Cookbook
The classic French ‘poireaux vinaigrettes’ have always appealed to me as a first course. The poached leeks marinated in a tangy dressing are elegant and appetite-whetting at the start of a meal. But, it occurred to me that the recipe could take on a different personality if fennel bulbs were combined with the leeks. I also added anise seed and tarragon to the dressing to reinforce the liquorice delicacy of the fennel.

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Cookbook Spotlight: Gefiltefest *Giveaway*

 

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The word doesn’t really exist – it was made up by Michael Leventhal, founder and organiser of a Jewish food charity and annual Jewish food festival in London.  It’s a play on the words ‘gefilte fish‘ perhaps the best known Ashkenazi dish.

This engaging cookbook is a collection of recipes from well known Ashkenazi and Sephardi chefs and food writers from across the globe, with a foreword by the best known of all, Claudia Roden.  It features personal favourites that you know are charged with emotion and every recipe has a story behind it.   Every dish reveals the writer’s roots, global wanderings and modern practicalities and passions.


 

A Healthier Take on Jewish Classics

 

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There are only a few things more confusing than advice on healthful eating: Paleoists, vegans, carb cyclers, ketone diet adepts, fructarians, vegetarians, flexitarians, doctors, dietitians, trainers, scientists, celebrities, coaches, chefs–and the list keeps going– all state that they’ve found the perfect way to eat, but many of them give opposite recommendations. And then, if we were already confused, there’s kashrut…However, if you look closely, there’s something everyone–including kosher laws–agrees upon: plants are great for us, and they should be the core of our diets.

We don’t normally think of Jewish dietary laws being plant based, however, they do give us plenty of freedom when it comes to the plant world. They also promote moderation with products from the animal kingdom; restricting us on how to obtain, combine and eat them. We do obsess with meat and dairy, however, maybe our eyes should be on the plants, which are pretty much free for all (except for checking them for insects, which are not plants!).


 

Cooking With Joy: Somewhat Sephardic Chulent

 

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One aspect of this cookbook that I really like, are the intro’s that Jamie writes before all the recipes. Some of the things that she writes really pertain to me and how I am cooking my way through this book. In this recipe’s intro, Jamie writes “Who reads a cookbook in order, anyway?” Well I am very happy she wrote that. Originally when I started this project I thought that I would just go in order and cook every recipe. Well I haven’t really been doing that. Jamie was right- maybe nobody actually reads a cookbook in order! I am skipping around, and still building up the courage to cook the Family Fricasee from pg 171, not sure what about it scares me; I just haven’t brought myself to face it yet. Also, how many briskets or huge pieces of meat can my family eat in a row? (Don’t answer that)


 

Top 5 Jewish Comfort Foods You Should Make this...

 

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We survived January! Don’t listen to the groundhog, because despite whatever snow might be in store the days are only getting longer and you can forget it’s winter by getting a head start on Purim or Pesach planning (okay, maybe not quite yet).  We tend to reach for warming, comforting foods in the dark of winter and even more so on Shabbos when it’s a time to relax to truly enjoy.  Below are the 10 best recipes for 5 of the most famous Jewish comfort foods, since it can be a contentious subject they are not listed in any particular order, we all deserve to choose our own favorite foods!  A lot of people have family recipes from Bubbe, so let us know what you do different to make your classic Jewish foods truly comforting!

 


 

Cooking Portuguese with The Kosher Butcher’s...

 

 

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Adapted from ‘Cooking the Portuguese way in South Africa’ by Mimi Jardim

November 2014 was the first ever ‘South African Cook Book Awards’. TV cameras, radio personalities and journalists were eagerly awaiting the announcement of the winner and runners up.


 

Israeli Inspired Cookies for Tu B’Shevat

 

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I wanted to create a recipe that was at once inspired by the foods of Israel- fruit, seed and nuts for Tu B’Shvat. The connection to using fruit is so clear- of the four renewal holidays in Judaism, it is all about trees and the fruit they bear at it’s literal essence after all. But many Jewish dishes for this celebration also utilize the Biblical 7 species: wheat, barley, dates or honey, figs, pomegranates, olives and grapes or wine.  I wanted to focus on the contemporary Israel- widely multi-cultural, sophisticated and rich in local food traditions as well. My first thought: tahini. I can’t think of the Middle East, or mizrachi cuisine without it.

Heralded chef Yotam Ottolenghi, in his book Jerusalem with Sami Tamimi, has a great recipe for a tahini cookie – and I have made  it and enjoyed it. There are plenty of tahini cookie  recipes around – Bon Appetit’s Tahini Cookies; David Lebovitz’s Tahini and Almond CookiesMartha Stewart’s Tahini Cookies


 

Travel The World Without Leaving Your Kitchen

 

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So Tamar and her Hubby (and really the entire family) love to travel the world, evidenced by their most recent trip to Bali, which I had to locate on the map, and which took them 3 days and 4 planes to get to.  So I may be exaggerating just a bit about their trek but I believe I am afforded some level of creative license when it comes to proving my point.

I on the other hand, am a real homebody.  I know it seems like I travel a fair amount for work but I do it just for work.  I don’t love flying, or bussing, or training, or boating, or driving for that matter.  I do love walking and hiking but not camping!  I don’t even like to leave the house at night.  I generally only leave for simchas, work and school meetings.


 

Cooking A Balinese Feast

 

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On my recent vacation in Bali, I relaxed, shopped, went to the spa, made jewelry and learned to cook.

The Caraway Cooking Class teaches all kinds of cooking classes and is located near Nusa Dua in Bali.  That is where I learned to make my own spring rolls, use a mortar and pestle, wrap food in a banana leaf and make spicy sambal.


 

Eat, Stay and Love in Bali

 

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The sun was setting over the Indian Ocean at the Rock Bar at AYANA Resort and Spa.  The sky a mix of red, yellow, orange, purple and blue – like a box of crayons spilled across the sky.  The 21 hour, two stopover marathon flight from JFK was most certainly worth it for this moment.

If you’ve never been to Bali, it’s about time to add this beautiful island to your bucket list.  The people are incredibly friendly, greeting the weary traveler with the warmest of smiles.  Our driver, Nyoman, was a walking encyclopedia of Balinese culture, traditions and traffic avoidance techniques that would have made the late Steve McQueen proud.


 

Vietnamese Naames Spring Rolls

 

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Vietnamese Naames Spring Rolls Posted 01/30/2015 by ITONOCHEL

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Street Food Recipes From Around the World

 

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You are sitting at home imagining yourself traveling from country to country. Whether it is Thailand, Korea, Japan, India or Vietnam. You occasionally stop to purchase a hotel or house, or sometimes just stop to think “imagine if I was in…”

Many of us have already visited Asia but we are not referring to just the countries, we are referring to the different kitchens and culinary inspirations.


 

Vegetarian Samosas with a Mango Cilantro Chutney

 

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Vegetarian Samosas with a Mango Cilantro Chutney Posted 01/30/2015 by ITONOCHEL

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Late Winter/Purim 2015

 

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Check out our latest issue with recipes for Purim inspired Challah, edible gifts, Hamantaschen Galette, Duck 4 ways, Whole Roasted Fish, DIY Whole Grain Pita, Salted caramel, 3 ingredient soups, Chef wars: Quinoa and so much more. Subscribe at www.joyofkosher.com/subscribe









 

In The JOK Kitchen With Allergy Free Cooking ...

 

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Special diets due to allergies are seen more and more these days and Jenna Short is no stranger to allergies. Trained as a graphic designer, Jenna discovered a dairy allergy after eating her way through Italy – which you’ll hear more about later. Although finding out you have an allergy can be difficult, Jenna turned her discovery into a business venture. After some experimentation with cooking, she opened up her boutique catering company called ShortbreadNYC, and recently came out with a new cookbook, Cooking Allergy-Free, where every recipe comes with notes for specific allergies and how to adjust most to fit any diet.