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Winn-Dixie Kosher Stores Within A Store *Giveaway*

 

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Check out this video as Jamie takes us through the Kosher Winn-Dixie grocery store in South Florida.

HEYYYYYYYYYY! Watch my #WinnDixieKosher store-within-a-store tour in South Florida. I shopped till I dropped and after eating fresh hot pizza and sushi I capped it all off with a 250+ person demo and book signing in the midst of one of those notorious Floridian torrential downpours!


 

British Savory Pies and Pasties For Thanksgiving

 

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Anglo-Jewish history dates back at least a millennium and it is rife with complex twists and turns that are still debated. There are a few things we know for certain: After being (sort of) welcomed in by Norman and Plantagenet rulers in feudal times, significant persecution of Jews began around the late 12th century. They were branded with yellow stars and taxed extensively. They were expelled altogether in the 13th century in a time of religious fervor under the fury of Blood Libels. From then until 1609, there is historical uncertainty about Jews in England, with reports of a few—such as a crypto-Jew (one who had converted and practiced in secret) serving as physician to Henry VIII.  In a twist we certainly didn’t hear about as kids during the telling of the Thanksgiving story, many Puritans were punished for seeming to be “jew-ized” and distinctly pro- Old Testament. The Pilgrim landed on Plymouth Rock in 1620.

But pressure from (mostly Jewish) Spanish and Portuguese traders, the work of  Sephardic Dutch Rabbinical leader Menasseh Ben Israel (who advocated for opening of lands closed to Jews), and the practical politics of the English ruler Oliver Cromwell, led to an invitation for Jews  to return by 1664.  From the Restoration to the Enlightenment and beyond, life became rich for Jews—and not just in London and its environs.

So, for Thanksgiving this year, I decided to take a look at some U.S.–Anglo–Jewish culinary traditions. By and large, English food (notwithstanding Chef Jamie Oliver and Jewish TV chef Nigella Lawson) has always been thought of as bland. Plebeian. And when I lived there, I can tell you that I ate more than my fair share of butter and cucumber sandwiches and egg and chips (aka French fries). The folks at Lutece weren’t worried. But I did have some curious little handheld vegetable pot pies. Those pasties (pronounced PAHS-tees, rhyming with “last” or “past”—not “paste”—with “ease” at the end), were soul warming and easy to eat and carry along. This little pie is not exactly seen as a Jewish food, no doubt, but it’s a fun—and freezable—meal. Once you get the hang of the dough, you can stuff it with almost any stew—and it’s great for leftovers. Freeze them stuffed but unbaked and you’ve got a treat waiting to happen. Pasties, by the way, originated in Cornwall, England, and are believed to have been created for miners who worked under harsh conditions for many hours a day and wanted and needed a meal that would be easy to carry and tidy up. Original pasties featured an inedible dough—so tough that it protected the stew. And it only ever, ever contained beef, turnips, potatoes, and onions. This is such a deep-seated traditional food that, I kid you not, there is a Cornish Pasty Association and it sets rules about this little hand pie.

The rules notwithstanding, I’ve come up with a very American version that takes advantage of turkey, dressing and leftover greens. Keep calm and make hand pies.


 

Just A Pie Full Of Sugar Helps The Medicine Go...

 

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The Kosher Connection decided to dedicate this month’s link up to our longtime friend and distinguished Jewish food historian, Gil Marks. Gil has been sick for a while and we want to wish him a refuah shleimah (complete healing). I am sharing my recipe for these mini pies (full of sugar) in hopes to add a little sweetness during this otherwise difficult time. Gil has been an inspiration and a true pioneer. We thank Gil for all his amazing books, writing and teachings over the years and look forward to many more.

I made this recipe as an adaptation to Momofuku’s famous crack pie, I read about online. It is supposed to be so good, that you can’t stop eating it.  I first discovered Momofuku’s recipes when I attempted a new recipe for chocolate cookies that just didn’t really hold together and I ended up with a bunch of chocolate cookie crumbs.  I was able to use those crumbs to make these Chocolate Chocolate Cookies with Cookie Crumbs, which turned out absolutely amazing.  I learned that one of Momofuku’s specialties was using cookie crumbs and cake crumbs in the cookies and cakes.  So, when I found myself with graham cracker crumbs that wouldn’t hold together I knew where to turn.


 

Planning Your Thanksgiving Menu

 

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Most other food and recipe websites are doing countdowns to Thanksgiving, we save ours for Passover (you can sign up for Passover countdown here).  For everyone else in the world, Thanksgiving, celebrated with a multi-course extravagant meal, is a big to do and requires lots of planning.  For most of us, Thanksgiving is a piece of cake (or maybe pie).  After three day yom tov holidays all throughout October and the cleaning and prepping it takes to celebrate 2 Passover seders, we (I) revel in a day where we can actually cook food the day of serving.


 

Cooking With Joy: Latkes

 

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“Mommy is it Chanuka”? “Nope, no it is not. Mommy is cooking her way through a cookbook, so we might be having things a little out of season from now on”. I totally see how that could confuse a 2 year old ☺.


 

50 Thanksgiving Recipes

 

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Thanksgiving always seems to sneak up and send me running to the kitchen for a marathon of cooking.  Despite all of the holiday themed blog posts and downright delectable pins on pinterest, I never seem to be prepared.  When I started becoming religious Thanksgiving was one of those days where I could say to my family “See, I’m still like you”!  I treat the day as an excuse to overeat (did I really just admit that?!) and a chance to spend extra time with the family.  Below are 50 Thanksgiving recipes to help streamline your menu planning.

 


 

Recipes Meant For Sharing

 

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Those in the know say that family dinner is an adhesive bonding experience between family members. Whenever you can, you should make a point to bring the whole family together for dinner at least once per week. A fun and pleasant meal will give everyone quality family time.

It is also wonderful to have friends over when you have extra time. Make a big meal, invite some friends, relax and enjoy. The kids will keep each other busy and away from the television and the adults can all enjoy the food.


 

In The Joy of Kosher Kitchen With Rabbi Lawrence

 

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It has been a while since we have heard from him, but some of you might remember our Joy of Kosher Rabbi, Rabbi Lawrence Hajioff.  He has answered quite a few of our burning food and holiday Jewish questions and you can see them all in our Ask The Rabbi blog.  Rabbi Lawrence loves to answer question and has had plenty of practice over the past 13 years working as a Rabbi and as the director of the Jewish Enrichment Center in NYC.  In his first book, Rabbi Lawrence puts it all out there for us and he goes well beyond food, Jew Got Questions?

Jamie and Rabbi Lawrence go way back and in fact, his wife Anita is the source for one of the recipes in the Joy of Kosher Cookbook.  In honor of the Rabbi’s new book, we are sharing Anita’s Lachmagine recipe as written in the cookbook.  I have heard Anita’s name mentioned in many conversations with Jamie and I know she has inspired her cooking in many ways.  Specifically for this recipe Jamie appreciates the shortcuts Anita allows, like using prune butter and tomato paste instead of temerhindi and prepared pizza rounds instead of making your own.


 

8 Perfect Pumpkin Recipes

 

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11 years ago this January I met my husband for the first time.  It was a blind date.  Two weeks later we were engaged and spent our first Shabbos together at Uncle Morse and Aunt Judy’s.  I don’t remember exactly what Aunt Judy served but it prompted met to blurt out “Oh I just LOVE orange food!” really, really loudly and dramatically. (Did you just hear the record player screech?)  As it turns out I do love all things orange – sweet potatoes, butternut squash, carrots, pumpkins, oranges… but it came out kinda flakey and ditzy sounding.  To this day whenever I think about it and even now as I write about it my shoulders hunch and I physically cower in embarrassment.  I am sure Aunt Judy doesn’t remember it – unless of course, she does.

So in honor of the season and my love for all foods orange – especially pumpkins which top the list – here are my favorite pumpkin recipes.


 

Everything Is Better with Tahini

 

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When I was growing up, we stayed far away from tahini.  My dad has a sesame allergy and I didn’t really know what I was missing.  After all, tahini was still largely overlooked as a mainstream product in the U.S.  I remember once trying some packaged halva and I didn’t care to try that again.  I also remember having a can of tahini that blended the sesame paste with lemon and water already for you, and it tasted about as bad as it sounds describing it now.

It has only been the last several years that I have come to LOVE tahini (sorry Abba) and I expect more and more people will be jumping on the tasty tahini bandwagon soon.


 

Drinking In Fall Colors

 

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Use colors and flavors to infuse fall into your beverages.  The following cocktails look the part; they play on our fall sensibilities by playing off the harvest season in terms of their tastes, colors and connections to our traditions. They can be made into mocktails by leaving out the alcohol and increasing the amount of the mixer so everyone can lift a glass together.

All cocktails make one serving. To make multiple shots for a group and save yourself a lot of time, increase the proportions accordingly and make a bunch at once. Just make sure to shake long enough to chill the entire mixture down.


 

Cooking With Joy: Yerushalmi Kugel

 

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This was my first time making Yerushalmi Kugel.

I can’t say that I was nervous, although there was a lot of pressure on me for cooking this dish. Hubs spent a few years in Israel and has a strong idea of what this classic kugel is supposed to taste like. It was fairly easy to prepare so that was definitely an added bonus. The finished product could not have come out any better!


 

15 Recipes to Make this November

 

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November tends to be a rather dismal month, but so far the weather has just been beautiful!  It’s only just started, but I’m really looking forward to the coming month.  Seeing that November, similar to Mar Cheshvan, can be a bit bleak it is a great time to break out colorful comfort foods.  Warm soups and stews that are still lighter than their winter counterparts, leafy salads and plenty of root vegetables are on this month’s menu.  Below are 15 warming recipes to try this November.

 


 

Vegetarian Monte Cristo Sandwich

 

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A Monte Cristo sandwcih is like a stuffed, savory french toast. Similar to a Croque Madame, these sandwiches are typically filled with ham and cheese and then dipped in an egg batter before being pan fried. To make a kosher version, you can just leave out the ham and make a glorified grilled cheese, but I wanted to take that a step further and add in apple slices.

Everyone knows apples work well with cheddar, in my recipe I actually used a Blue Marble cheese from Sincerely Brigitte, but a cheddar would work well too. The apple didn’t really get soft and I really enjoyed the crunch that it provided in this sandwich. While preparing this sandwich I learned that it is customary to serve a Monte Cristo sandwich with a sweet sauce, so I served mine with a Plum and Fennel Chutney I got from Kosher Artisanal. It went perfectly.


 

A New Very Flavorful Chicken Salad

 

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Making a fun mayonnaise is an easy way to perk up an old standby like chicken salad. Piri piri, sometimes called the African birdseye chili, is a chili pepper from the southern part of that continent and proud member of the hotter-than-heck family of peppers. My version is toned down considerably, with roasted poblanos. The dish offers a crunch from peanuts, often used in southern and central African cuisine, and a sweet bite of golden raisins, showing off a pinch of the complexity found in pan-Indian curries. And it’s all tucked in one delicious little sandwich.

Get my full recipe here.