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Four Fantastic Summer Salads

 

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Delicious fresh salads using all your favorite vegetables and some new ingredients you will want to add to your pantry.


 

RSVP For #SummerWithGolds Twitter Party and WIN

 

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You’re invited to join our #SummerWithGolds Twitter chat!
Hosted by @JoyofKosher and sponsored by Gold’s.


 

Morad Pomegranate Wine for Dinner and a Cocktail

 

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We all know that wine isn’t just for drinking (you can cook with it too) but did you know that it’s important that the wine you cook with should be just as tasty as the wine you want to drink? In fact, when you open up a bottle of wine to pour into your favorite stews and sauces, it’s a good idea to pour yourself a glass to drink while you cook. That’s an order! And since I must practice what I preach, I’m opening up a bottle of Morad Pomegranate Wine right now to drink while I write about this incredible sweet and sour wine made entirely of the finest pomegranates from Israel.


 

The Story of Bat Shlomo Winery

 

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In 1889 Baron Edmond De Rothschild started a new town in the ever growing Zichron Ya’akov.

This picturesque little town by the name of Bat Shlomo, sits on the lower slopes of Mount Carmel, and still features its original buildings (and in most cases descendants of the original families that lived there). It was named after Betty Salomon, the daughter of Salomon Mayer von Rothschild (the Baron’s grandfather).


 

10 Sweet and Savory Honey Recipes

 

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This post and giveaway is sponsored by The National Honey Board.

Honey does more than sweeten tea and suppress a cough. Honey has many versatile benefits in the kitchen, from replacing other granulated sweeteners in baked goods and other desserts to balancing the acidity and salt of salad dressings with a natural sweetness and mouth-filling texture. For many home cooks who think about honey during breakfast, they may be surprised to learn that many savory dishes will also benefit from adding honey.


 

In the JOK Kitchen with Silk Road Vegetarian ...

 

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The Silk Road refers to the routes of trade along Central Asia, India and the Mediterranean.  Many of our Jewish ancestors worked along these routes dealing in the spice trade.  Dahlia Abraham-Klein takes us all on a culinary journey through her heritage in her new book.  After years of suffering health problems on a regular American diet, Dahlia went back to her roots and found that the foods of her ancestors could be easily made today.  Many are naturally vegan and gluten free and they changed her life.

The Silk Road Vegetarian is the culmination of Dahlia’s transformation and celebration of her family’s strong culinary roots along the Silk Road. With 120 vegan, vegetarian and/or gluten free recipes tweaked for the modern cook, the Silk Road Vegetarian has something for everyone.  Dahlia shares a lot of herself in this book, but we wanted to know a little more.  Here is what we learned from Dahlia plus a few recipes from the book you can try out.  And don’t forget to enter the giveaway to win your own copy.


 

Baseball Birthday Party

 

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Take me out to the ball game, buy me some peanuts and cracker jacks…


 

Cooking with Joy: Coconut Berry Soup

 

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Coconut Milk is another one of those ingredients that I have only heard of and never tasted. As I opened the first can the scent transported me to a tropical island, imagining myself swinging in a hammock in a warm breeze under a palm tree, now back to reality. I just HAD to taste the milk, since I needed to know what my end product would taste like. It was creamy and not at all sweet with a mild taste of coconut. Since I am not someone who uses coconut often, this was new to me.


 

10 Oil-Free Recipes

 

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I’m slow to admit that I may be a bit heavy-handed when it comes to oil, there’s something to love about the sound of it simmering in a pan ready to make anything you throw at it taste good.  As of late, my family has become suspicious about just how necessary all of this oil is. With that in mind, I started exploring oil-free recipes here at Joy of Kosher and was surprised to find that dishes from a plentitude of cuisines can be made oil-free.  I’m not planning to say good-bye to oil for good, but I’m definitely ready to cut back and am glad that there are many recipes on the site, including the ones below, that will make this task easier.

 


 

I Like My Food All Rolled Up

 

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A couple of years ago Pesach, we did an “All Rolled Up” article, featuring Steak Rolls, Eggplant Rollatini, Kishka-Stuffed Chicken, and lots more. It was super popular. To this day, my Chicken Pastrami Rolls get more comments than any other recipe.


 

Instead of Heavy Cream, Try Coconut Milk

 

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ASK US: What do you recommend as a A SAVORY pareve substitute for heavy cream.

ANSWER:


 

Are Quail Eggs Kosher?

 

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From faux crab and shrimp to premium Kobe-Wagyu beef and bison to gourmet parve ‘cheese’, the kosher world has welcomed a lot of non-traditional, cutting-edge fare over the past few decades.  Never a people to settle for regular old matzah ball soup and gefilte fish, kosher food enthusiasts have always been ones to up the ante in kosher cuisine by introducing unusual and exotic foods into our repertoire. Ever since an O-U sponsored ‘Mesorah dinner’ at Levana Kirschenbaum’s famed restaurant in 2004, which served exotic foods not commonly found on a kosher menu-including quail, quail and quail eggs have gained much attention and interest from many kosher foodies and consumers. And why not, it’s all  kosher, isn’t it?

As it turns out- it’s not that simple. While the Torah provides physical signs and characteristics in mammals (i.e. that they have both split hooves and chew their cud) and fish (i.e. that they have both fins and scales) that identify them as a kosher species, it does not do the same for birds. Rather the Torah lists 24 families of non-kosher birds and leaves it to be assumed that accordingly the remaining species of birds are all kosher. But its still not that simple! According to tradition, after the Torah was given, Moses identified and detailed to the Jewish people which birds were permitted to be eaten, and which were forbidden. This oral tradition, known as a mesorah, has been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years. Of course, many things get lost over time- and this is no exception. Thus the status of the acceptability of many birds as kosher is not as widely recognized or accepted as the birds for which we have a stronger based tradition and they are thus forbidden to be eaten according to the Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish  Law). For instance- it is universally accepted that chicken is a kosher bird while even today some people will still not accept turkey as a kosher bird. According to the O-U’s website, many families of birds have been accepted as kosher in different localities at one time in history, including goose, pigeons, doves, and of course- quail.


 

5 Things To Do In NY With Your Family

 

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In today’s world, most of us find ourselves working all the time.  Cell phones or tablets in hand it is really hard to shut off.  I am thankful for Shabbat every week, but I still feel that I don’t give quite enough of my time and attention to my kids.  During the school year, everyone is running around, Sundays get filled up with extra curricular activities and my husband and I fight over time to work rather than time to take the kids out and have some fun.  Last Summer we decided we would devote our Sundays to our family.  We planned an outing each week where we all could be together, let go of our work and our digital devices explore our city and be together.  We called it Super Summer Sundays.

Whether you decide to follow in our stead or just want some ideas for those living or visiting NY, I thought I would share a few of our favorite things to do in NY with a family.


 

Made With Love For Father’s Day

 

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Growing up, my father was a Commander in the U.S. Navy. His position meant nothing at home of course, where my mother had him out-ranked. Still, it was ‘civilian’ Dad who taught me one of the most important lessons I ever learned in the kitchen. He taught me how to cook with love.

My father was the Sunday morning chef. He taught my siblings and me how to make all-manner of eggs, French toast, waffles with ice cream, and the best sandwiches ever! He explained the difference between just throwing the ingredients together in a bowl and taking ownership and responsibility of what we make. He explained to us that it was not just about the right measurements or even using the best ingredients, what mattered most in the kitchen was what mattered most in life. The secret ingredient was an attitude. He taught us, the most important part of the process was making the food with love.


 

Cooking With Joy: Shabbos Special

 

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This project is going pretty well and the more I work my way through the book the more encouraged I get. So far I have finished the Appetizers section and am heading towards sides. Not sure how I will continue from here, but this week I have focused on Shabbos food. We are having guests for shabbos lunch, so it seemed like the perfect opportunity to try these recipes out. Aside from my usual shabbos fair, I made the following things from the cookbook- Deep Dish Kugel, Garlic Ranch dip, Deli Salad, Gefilte fish and even made the Lemon Lovers Chummus again, because it was that good and easy!