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Gastronomic Journal of Mendy Pellin

 

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Celebrate Sukkot With Unbreakable Tableware

 

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The crash of broken glass is the highlight of a Jewish wedding ceremony, but it’s not a sound you want to hear anywhere near the lunch or dinner table.  With three children, I’ve always been interested in the possibility of unbreakable plates and tableware, but to be honest, they usually look cheap and ugly.

With the holiday of Sukkot approaching and my meal traveling from the kitchen to the unstable fold-out table outdoors, I thought it might be time to revisit the melamine marketplace.  That’s when I got a chance to discover the fun colorful dishes from French Bull.


 

Bento Boxes – Getting Creative With School...

 

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My friend wants you to make her a lunch,” said my daughter, Cadence, as she got off the bus from camp. “Mine too,” added my oldest daughter, Laine. Later on that evening, I received an email from my oldest daughter’s camp counselor expressing how impressed she was with Laine’s “extraordinary lunches.” This was good news; not only were my children eating their lunches, they were making their friends envious. Before you hate me, I must confess, this was not always the case.

As a mother of two extremely picky children, I faced my fair share of uneaten lunches and complaints. It wasn’t until I walked by a Japanese restaurant one afternoon when the solution finally dawned on me. The restaurant boasted an impressive display of very realistic-looking plastic food in the window, presumably menu items, each arranged and garnished beautifully. One of my daughters pressed her face up against the window and, on the verge of salivating, exclaimed, “That looks yuuuuuummmy.” No argument from me there.  It did look yummy. But, what was she talking about? She hates eggs.
And seaweed.
And fish.
Shall I go on?


 

Break Fast with Cheese *Giveaway*

 

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Typical breakfast fare includes bagels, lox, cream cheese, maybe a few quiches and maybe a baked ziti or pasta salad.  Sometimes you want to try something new, but it has to be easy and something you can make ahead.  So I got together with The Cheese Guy and came up with a few new recipes for you.


 

It’s Been 1 Year Since I Made Aliyah and My...

 

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Just about a year ago, Hubby and I decided to pick up with our five children and move from our comfortable home in Monsey, New York to a cottage in Israel, a place where we would all have to learn the language and culture, a place where we would be immigrants, just like my parents had been in the USA.  People are still asking me why.


 

Pre-Yom Kippur Menu: Hearty and Filling Foods

 

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Before a fast day, it’s important to fill yourself up with hearty foods but it’s also very important to avoid overly spicy and salty ingredients. Keeping that in mind, I’ve created a menu of recipes that will fill you up before the fast but won’t make you feel bloated or thirsty. A few tips to remember for your last meal before the fast of Yom Kipper: don’t overeat, drink tons of water, eat foods that are easy to digest and eat a lot of protein and complex carbohydrates. So enjoy your pre-Yom Kippur meal and have a safe and meaningful fast!

Salsa Baked Salmon


 

Host a Joy of Kosher Cookbook Club Get a Free Book

 

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The Joy of Kosher Cookbook Club is so delicious, it’s good enough to eat, and that’s exactly what we’re going to do.

We are looking for 10 volunteers across the United States to HOST Joy of Kosher Cookbook Club Dinner Parties.


 

Happy and Sweet New Year!

 

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Everyone here at Joy of Kosher wishes you and your family a year full of blessing, happiness, success and sweetness beyond your wildest dreams. May you have fabulous food and wonderful family and friends with whom to share it.  Please count us in as family, and we’ll count you in as ours.

In case you missed any of our Rosh Hashanah posts here is rundown of  some of our favorites from this year and years passed.


 

An Italian Holiday Feast

 

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In last year’s Rosh Hashanah issue of Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller we shared three unique holiday menus.  Italian, Moroccan and Traditional.  Today we will share Alessandra’s Italian feast with you, but you don’t want to have to wait a year for the amazing recipes and menus we feature in our magazine, get your subscription here.

Click through to each recipe to find make ahead tips to make this menu easier to prepare.


 

Leeks and Apples for Rosh Hashanah

 

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As we are so close to Rosh Hashanah, there are so many things to say about it. I am focusing on food obviously. I come from a Sephardic family and both my parents are from Saloniki, Greece. I grew up on Jewish-Greek food. The holidays were the times when I could most see the differences between our customs and the others.

 


 

Infused Honey

 

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One of my favorite experiences growing up in Seattle was driving to the Puyallup Fair every September. We admired the enormous prize-winning animals, rode the roller coasters, and walked through the booths of “As Seen on TV” products. What I looked forward to the most was the Snoqualmie Valley Honey, and every year we stocked up on a variety of flavors for Rosh Hashanah. My whole family and I stood at the honey booth, taste-testing each one, from Washington Wild Blackberry (my favorite) to Clover and Peppermint, while my mom loaded up on honey bears and honey sticks for us to enjoy year-round. Since I no longer live in Seattle and always miss going to the fair, I love to make my own infused honey to use for the holidays. Every drizzle is a trip down memory lane and there is nothing more gratifying than making your own artisan honey.

The directions are the same for any flavored honey you choose, and the options are endless!


 

7 Wines to Help You Celebrate The New Year

 

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We all know the Jewish holidays are never on time, they are either early or late.  This year they are early, very early and don’t even get me started about celebrating Hanukkah on Thanksgiving %@#$!

First, I have to get through cooking for Rosh Hashanah with three kids running around the house, bouncing off the walls and suffering from withdrawal from summer camp and my feeble attempts to limit digital time to a mere 3 hours a day… Did I hear a “good luck with that”?


 

Use Your Leftover Brisket For New Meals

 

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I hate wasting food. I hate throwing out leftovers. It’s a hangover from my upbringing. I can still hear my parents’ voice in my head, telling me about the poor starving children in Europe.

Usually there’s no waste at my house though because these days I’m cooking just for two, which means small portions and not much extra. But at holiday time it’s back to mama for my grown daughters and their families, and like most other old-fashioned Jewish mothers, I always cook too much of everything. My kids leave with doggie bags. Still, there’s always plenty of food left in the fridge.


 

New Joy of Kosher Cookbook Q&A *Giveaway*

 

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I figure you may be wondering about my new Joy of Kosher cookbook, like what’s the Mah Nishtanah this time. So I interviewed myself, asking the questions people ask me.   If I missed anything you just gotta know, ask in the comments and I will answer you – a whole lot more fun than talking to myself.

Q: So this is your third cookbook. Did you always want to write cookbooks?


 

New Chicken and Quince Recipe For Rosh Hashanah

 

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We are extremely excited to have the opportunity to do a guest post for Joy of Kosher. So much so, that we immediately started thinking of different dishes we could create. We wanted something unique,  something that would represent our cooking and also that would appeal to the Joy of Kosher readers. At the same time, we wanted to step out of “our” box a little bit. As some of you may know, most of the recipes you’ll find in our blog are vegan and vegetarian. And that is mainly how we cook at home… but the Holidays are always a bit more special. So we wanted to incorporate some meat this time and get creative with it.

That’s when the idea of chicken and quince came to mind.