Home Rotator

 

Gluten Free and Natural on Tu B’Shevat

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

It is customary to celebrate Tu B’Shevat by eating the Seven Species of fruit and grains which are native to the land of Israel. When I think of Tu B’Shevat I think of slicing open a pomegranate, eating the seeds over Greek yogurt and drizzling it with honey for breakfast, while for dinner I’d imagine Moroccan chicken marinated and then baked in olives and prunes.

Tu B’Shevat is a special day not only for celebrating trees but also for celebrating everything the earth provides for us; all of our fruit and vegetables, nuts and seeds, wheat and barley, etc. Tu B’Shevat is a day to celebrate our health and maybe even re-evaluate our eating habits.  The perfect time to introduce new fruits and vegetables into our daily meals.  After all Tu B’Shevat is a new year, and on New Years we make new resolutions.


 

Candy Wrapper Hair Accessories *Giveaway*

 

Contributed by:

 

30 comments | Leave Comment

 

We have a very strange candy minhag in my home every Friday night when my brother in law comes to stay with us…. which is pretty much every weekend! After the dishes are cleared and the table cleaned, out comes the candy. Mike and Ike’s ALWAYS make an appearance. When I was asked to come up with a craft using candy wrappers I was so beyond excited since I’ve been thinking about doing something with them for so long. I loved the idea of creating hair accessories out of the old boxes and wrappers. It’s such a great party craft for girls or the perfect mom and daughter project to bond over.

 


 

Essential 6 Ingredient Soups

 

Contributed by:

 

6 comments | Leave Comment

 

When temperatures drop, nothing is more comforting than cozying up with a hot bowl of soup. As a personal chef, I find myself making these three recipes weekly for my clients, and who would ever guess they only require 6 ingredients? These soups take no time to prepare and freeze wonderfully for an easy, last minute dinner. Immersion blenders are essential here, creating a creamy consistency without the extra calories. Want to jazz them up for a special occasion? See starred comments on the recipes for some unique ideas that will impress your guests!

Minted Pea Soup


 

Vote Now For Your Favorites and WIN

 

Contributed by:

 

10 comments | Leave Comment

 

Thank you all for nominating your favorites for our Best of Kosher 2013 awards.  The winner of the kitchen gadgets from Lekue is huviepoo and the kitchen gadgets from Rosle goes to davises88 .  Now, the real fun begins – voting and more great prizes!!

Check out all our 8 categories on our Best of Kosher 2013 page, vote for your favorites, every day until January 27th.


 

Tu B’Shevat Celebration Menu

 

Contributed by:

 

4 comments | Leave Comment

 

One week from now is the holiday of Tu B’Shevat, beginning the evening of January 15th.  For many years in my life this holiday went unnoticed.  Of course, I remember the celebrations in school with the hard to chew boxer that you either loved or hated and the annual planting of trees (I grew up in Florida, so we could plant this time of year and not freeze to death), but in the years between my being in school and having kids, I will admit I didn’t do much celebrating.  Now, I realize that there many ways we can go about celebrating this holiday, whether it be the smallest gesture of making a seven species granola (thanks for the great idea in the comments here) or going all out with a Tu B’shevat Seder.

Tu B’Shevat literally means the 15th day of the Hebrew month of Shevat.  It is the birthday of the trees in Israel.  The day that the trees begin their new fruit bearing cycle.  So we celebrate by eating the fruits of the trees.  Really any fruit counts, but it is tradition to eat the kinds that are mentioned in the Torah when praising the bounty of Israel: grapes, figs, pomegranates, olives and dates.  Some go even further and like to include the full seven species of Israel which adds wheat and barley to the fruits.   There are also many kabalistic rituals around this holiday which have become more popular recently and is the reason many people hold a seder, get a guide to making your own seder from Hazon, here.


 

Being Good and Loving It With Poached Pears

 

Contributed by:

 

9 comments | Leave Comment

 

Sometimes I behave. Sometimes I don’t. When I am being good, poached pears taste like a beautiful sweet gift from G-d. A light, pleasant, end to a meal — elegant enough to serve on Shabbos easy enough to prepare in about 20 minutes.

Growing up compote was a staple at my grandparents home – served both as a side to the main or as a sweet dessert. I like to think of my Orange Ginger Poached Pears as a dressed up version of the fruit stew I grew up with.


 

In the JOK Kitchen with Tina Wasserman *Giveaway*

 

Contributed by:

 

55 comments | Leave Comment

 

Tina Wasserman has been in the food writing business for a while, but two years ago when she wrote her first cookbook, Entree to Judaism: A Culinary Exploration of The Jewish Diaspora, she really appeared on the map.  Tina loves to share the history of our food and helps us all connect to our Jewish roots through food.  Her new book, Entree to Judaism For Families, is filled with the tools to help kids of all ages learn to cook in the kitchen and learn bits of history too.  I had the chance to meet Tina recently and I came away with so much amazing knowledge.  Let’s see what we can learn now.

Your books are filled with little history lessons connecting the food to Jewish history, how did you learn all these facts?


 

10 Ways To Eat and Love Beets

 

Contributed by:

 

9 comments | Leave Comment

 

Growing up I never really liked beets.  I really had only ever seen them out of a jar usually in a salad bar.  Never had a I seen them raw or with green tops. Apparently, that is still the case for most people living in the U.S. where most beets consumed are from a can and even when sold raw they are often sold without their tops.  Only recently did I discover a love for beets and then a greater love for their green tops.

I have been reading a new book all about the history of vegetables and how to choose, store and cook the best ones for maximum nutrition.  The book, Eating on the Wild Side by Jo Robinson, is a wealth of information that I will share when I can.  So, while I already loved beets, I found even more reasons that you should love them too.  Beets are a rich source of boron, which is good for bones and apparently may be an aphrodisiac too.  And beets, even without their greens (but, please eat the greens they are so good) are one of the healthiest vegetables.  People who eat beets on a regular basis have a lower risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, obesity, and more.  Robinson also mentions that the nitrates in beets have been shown to enhance athletic performance, a glass of beet juice with Wheaties might be the true breakfast of champions.


 

Gluten Free Travel Inspired Coconut Chicken

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Hey, everyone!

I’m really glad to be joining you here on the Joy of Kosher and I just wanted to introduce myself formally — as I sit at home in my PJs — before we embark on our culinary journey together, otherwise… you know…it could be awkward.


 

Healthy Resolutions You Can Keep

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Happy New Year! Welcome to a new year and a new you! January has long been a time for resolutions and plans to improve ourselves in the coming year. The most common resolutions made are losing weight and getting fit. The most common resolutions broken are losing weight and getting fit. However, this doesn’t have to be true for you this year. Making a resolution to become healthier can be as easy as changing your focus and creating a healthy lifestyle.

Now while that may sound intimidating to completely change the way you live, it really doesn’t have to be scary or difficult. All it takes is changing your mindset and setting up your day to minimize temptation and maximize good habits. This can be as simple as throwing out that ashtray, and putting your running shoes where you’ll see them (and use them).


 

How To Cook Turkey London Broil

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

There are three things that intrigue me… first and foremost is food and the many ways it can be turned from nourishment into an edible work of art.  Next is words… the written, the spoken, the meanings.  And finally there is history.  The history of our people, my people, antique furniture and old photos.  Along with these very separate subjects is often a chance for them to come together, especially for us food writing chefs.

Old recipes and those with interesting names are also fun for me to work with.  Where did they come from, and what has made them endure the test of time and the counting of calories?  Who was the first one to create a dish, and who was the first one to put it in a cookbook?  A modern day favorite is the Caesar Salad, which does not hail from the Roman Emperor Caesar, but from the Grand Master Maitre d’ Hotel at the brand new Waldorf Astoria of the 1930′s.  Or was it the Italian Chef Caesar Cardini, living in Mexico in the 1920′s?


 

Healthy and Gourmet Popcorn Recipes

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Who was it that first discovered the magical potential hidden within every kernel of corn?

That healthy snack, light as air…  that burst of white, crunchy happiness?


 

Make Your House Smell Amazing With A Healthy Treat

 

Contributed by:

 

9 comments | Leave Comment

 

On many a cold winter New York mornings I would drop my then 2-year old son off at his play group to the smell of hot, homemade granola.  It was intoxicating.  Sweet and syrupy the power of suggestion was enough to make me demand that his teacher let me taste, just a little, for research purposes of course.  Teacher Rivky as she was known ran the play group out of her home and was all too happy to cater to my “research”.  She was such a giving person and always sent me on my way with a granola care package big enough to feed me and the growing baby in my belly.

I love the simplicity of the recipe and the fact that almost any substitution works.  Instead of raisins use dried cherries, cranberries or blueberries.  Instead of almonds try walnuts, pecans or peanuts.  If you have the palate of a pregnant woman you can just add all of the above.  Warning – don’t burn that precious palate of yours – wait at least 15 minutes for your granola to cool before taste testing, for research purposes of course.


 

A Taste of Puerto Rico

 

Contributed by:

 

6 comments | Leave Comment

 

The warm Caribbean sun that seems to kiss the sand of Puerto Rico shined brightly on us when we landed a few weeks ago for a long-weekend far from the falling temperatures and falling leaves of New York in November.  To be completely honest, Puerto Rico was never on my must-see list.  I tend to go for more exotic travel, (see my article about Thailand and Costa Rica) but the combination of a cheap direct flight and free babysitting (thanks in-laws) was too much to resist.

The beaches of Isla Verde are located about 8 minutes from San Juan Luis Muñoz Marín International Airport and since you don’t have to go through customs you can take off at 9 and dip your toes in the warm sand by lunchtime.  Although the Jewish population is only around 2,000, it is the largest community in the Caribbean islands and boasts a Reform and Conservative synagogue and a Chabad that is within easy walking distance to many beachfront hotels, including the El San Juan Hotel and Ritz Carlton, both of which I was able to experience during my stay.


 

DIY – Homemade Bubbly Cocktails

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

This time of year sparkling wine and champagne are in high demand.   We love to toast with champagne and we love to mix it up too.   Light and fruity wine cocktails are the perfect complement to any celebration. When you have some bubbles, a bit of spice, and some succulent fruit, you can’t go wrong.

How to choose good wines to use in cocktails?