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10 Oil-Free Recipes

 

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I’m slow to admit that I may be a bit heavy-handed when it comes to oil, there’s something to love about the sound of it simmering in a pan ready to make anything you throw at it taste good.  As of late, my family has become suspicious about just how necessary all of this oil is. With that in mind, I started exploring oil-free recipes here at Joy of Kosher and was surprised to find that dishes from a plentitude of cuisines can be made oil-free.  I’m not planning to say good-bye to oil for good, but I’m definitely ready to cut back and am glad that there are many recipes on the site, including the ones below, that will make this task easier.

 


 

I Like My Food All Rolled Up

 

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A couple of years ago Pesach, we did an “All Rolled Up” article, featuring Steak Rolls, Eggplant Rollatini, Kishka-Stuffed Chicken, and lots more. It was super popular. To this day, my Chicken Pastrami Rolls get more comments than any other recipe.


 

Instead of Heavy Cream, Try Coconut Milk

 

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ASK US: What do you recommend as a A SAVORY pareve substitute for heavy cream.

ANSWER:


 

Are Quail Eggs Kosher?

 

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From faux crab and shrimp to premium Kobe-Wagyu beef and bison to gourmet parve ‘cheese’, the kosher world has welcomed a lot of non-traditional, cutting-edge fare over the past few decades.  Never a people to settle for regular old matzah ball soup and gefilte fish, kosher food enthusiasts have always been ones to up the ante in kosher cuisine by introducing unusual and exotic foods into our repertoire. Ever since an O-U sponsored ‘Mesorah dinner’ at Levana Kirschenbaum’s famed restaurant in 2004, which served exotic foods not commonly found on a kosher menu-including quail, quail and quail eggs have gained much attention and interest from many kosher foodies and consumers. And why not, it’s all  kosher, isn’t it?

As it turns out- it’s not that simple. While the Torah provides physical signs and characteristics in mammals (i.e. that they have both split hooves and chew their cud) and fish (i.e. that they have both fins and scales) that identify them as a kosher species, it does not do the same for birds. Rather the Torah lists 24 families of non-kosher birds and leaves it to be assumed that accordingly the remaining species of birds are all kosher. But its still not that simple! According to tradition, after the Torah was given, Moses identified and detailed to the Jewish people which birds were permitted to be eaten, and which were forbidden. This oral tradition, known as a mesorah, has been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years. Of course, many things get lost over time- and this is no exception. Thus the status of the acceptability of many birds as kosher is not as widely recognized or accepted as the birds for which we have a stronger based tradition and they are thus forbidden to be eaten according to the Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish  Law). For instance- it is universally accepted that chicken is a kosher bird while even today some people will still not accept turkey as a kosher bird. According to the O-U’s website, many families of birds have been accepted as kosher in different localities at one time in history, including goose, pigeons, doves, and of course- quail.


 

5 Things To Do In NY With Your Family

 

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In today’s world, most of us find ourselves working all the time.  Cell phones or tablets in hand it is really hard to shut off.  I am thankful for Shabbat every week, but I still feel that I don’t give quite enough of my time and attention to my kids.  During the school year, everyone is running around, Sundays get filled up with extra curricular activities and my husband and I fight over time to work rather than time to take the kids out and have some fun.  Last Summer we decided we would devote our Sundays to our family.  We planned an outing each week where we all could be together, let go of our work and our digital devices explore our city and be together.  We called it Super Summer Sundays.

Whether you decide to follow in our stead or just want some ideas for those living or visiting NY, I thought I would share a few of our favorite things to do in NY with a family.


 

Made With Love For Father’s Day

 

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Growing up, my father was a Commander in the U.S. Navy. His position meant nothing at home of course, where my mother had him out-ranked. Still, it was ‘civilian’ Dad who taught me one of the most important lessons I ever learned in the kitchen. He taught me how to cook with love.

My father was the Sunday morning chef. He taught my siblings and me how to make all-manner of eggs, French toast, waffles with ice cream, and the best sandwiches ever! He explained the difference between just throwing the ingredients together in a bowl and taking ownership and responsibility of what we make. He explained to us that it was not just about the right measurements or even using the best ingredients, what mattered most in the kitchen was what mattered most in life. The secret ingredient was an attitude. He taught us, the most important part of the process was making the food with love.


 

Cooking With Joy: Shabbos Special

 

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This project is going pretty well and the more I work my way through the book the more encouraged I get. So far I have finished the Appetizers section and am heading towards sides. Not sure how I will continue from here, but this week I have focused on Shabbos food. We are having guests for shabbos lunch, so it seemed like the perfect opportunity to try these recipes out. Aside from my usual shabbos fair, I made the following things from the cookbook- Deep Dish Kugel, Garlic Ranch dip, Deli Salad, Gefilte fish and even made the Lemon Lovers Chummus again, because it was that good and easy!


 

Father’s Day Comfort Food Redux

 

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Growing up, many summer Sunday nights were spent in the car traveling from Long Island back to Manhattan.  There was always one June weekend when we left unusually early in the day to beat post-barbecue Father’s Day traffic.   I learned two things, 1. Avoiding traffic is a game of strategy and 2. Barbecues are a popular Father’s Day minhag (custom/tradition).  As you can guess my family didn’t celebrate with a barbecue, because we were busy avoiding traffic, but you can’t help but love some of the classic foods served at summer barbecues.  That being said, many of those foods are served all year long and could use some revamping to help make the day special, below are 5 comfort foods perfect for a Father’s Day barbecue or just a quiet day with Dad.

 


 

A Father’s Day Menu

 

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Mother’s Day bring brunch and breakfast in bed.  Father’s day usually means BBQ often with Dad doing all the work.  That’s okay, cause I think he likes it as long as he is only in charge of the meat.  Here is a menu that will let the Dad’s enjoy the grilling and the meat and  everyone else enjoy the celebration.

pina colada smoothie

Pina Colada


 

No Food In The Car

 

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It’s a rule.  A real rule.  One we never break.  Mostly cause it’s a dad rule.

There’s always one (disciplinarian) in the family.  In this family it’s Hubby.  After selling our dirty-like-a-dumpster minivan Hubby instituted the no eating in the car rule when we got our new wheels.


 

In the JOK Kitchen with The Forest Feast *Giveaway...

 

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The Forest Feast is a new vegetarian cookbook written by Erin Gleeson from her cabin in the woods.  After years of city living, she and her (Rabbi) husband moved to California and chose to live in a cabin in the woods.  Erin is incredibly talented and enjoys the beauty of her outdoor surroundings.  The cookbook is filled with vibrant photos of her food in the gorgeous setting of her home.  She shares bonus pictures of her surroundings to make us all jealous and she even includes fanciful watercolor illustrations and hand lettering.  Her recipes are simple, all vegetarian and pleasing to all your senses. To purchase The Forest Feast click here.

You grew up vegetarian, did you ever go through a rebellious meat phase? 


 

How To Cook With Herbs

 

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Herb Guide To Cooking


 

Simple Salad with Tehina and Yogurt Dressing

 

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Simple Salad with Tehina and Yogurt Dressing Posted 06/06/2014 by Aviv Harkov
Every good Shavuot meal ends with a delicious but heavy cheesecake. It’s also not unheard of for the meal to be quite heavy too, filled with cheeses, pastas, and anything else that could feel like a rock in the bottom of your stomach. Now, it is time to try something lighter. This salad is both filling and delicious, but also simple to prepare. The creaminess of the yogurt and tehina create a luscious new salad that will get your family away from all the heavy fattening things get them excited about salad. The seasoning in the dressing is light but its presence is felt throughout the dressing. Its creamy consistency and rich taste makes this a lot more than just another salad.

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Cooking with Joy: Tropical Fruit Guacamole and...

 

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Its funny, the Deconstructed Tropical Gaucamole is the “dressed up” version of the dish, but it actually takes less time to prep. So in no time at all you have an upscale fork and knife savory fruit salad! The olive oil with the salt really elevated the simple avacado, mango and pineapple. I piled each on top of eachother, cut through the layers and sopped up the extra salt and oil before hitting my mouth. Really simple and good.


 

A Guide To Ancient Grains

 

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You might notice a strange sensation the next time you are strolling down the aisle at your local supermarket.

A prehistoric flashback?
Caveman-like confusion?