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12 Passover Seder Mains

 

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It feels like Passover is just around the corner!  Conversations always seem to lead to discussions of pesach (Passover) preparations, whether it’s cleaning, menu planning, or figuring out how to configure the house for all of the guests.  While I am not one to give cleaning tips, I would like to offer up the plethora of Pesach recipes here at Joy of Kosher.  If you’re looking for articles with a mix of recipes, check out some of mine from last year (I can’t believe how the time has flown!) including A Trio of Passover Picnic Menus15 Salad Recipes for Passover; 15 Healthy Passover Chicken Recipes; 25 Passover Dessert Recipes; and 101 Passover Recipes.  There are plenty of recipes for many of your menu planning needs, and to add to that below are 12 ideas for main dishes to serve after the seder including meat and vegetarian recipes.

 


 

Cooking With Wine

 

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Let’s start with a confession: I can’t drink. Not much, at least. Anything more than half a cup of wine makes me extremely tipsy. For this reason, even if I do like the taste, I’ve always had to stop at the first glass, and never had the chance to fine-tune my sensory abilities and learn to appreciate the more complex bouquets.

My lack of tolerance for alcohol has often made me feel not only deprived, but also a bit insecure. After all, since we share with France the title of largest producer in the world, wine in Italy is a big deal.


 

Passover Comfort Foods

 

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With all the stress that passover tends to bring it is essential that we have some great comfort food recipes in our back pocket!


 

Passover Make Ahead Breakfasts

 

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Effortless entertaining while often seemingly elusive can actually, easily be achieved with make-ahead meals.


 

Gluten-Free Matzo Balls

 

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Gluten-Free Matzo Balls Posted 03/17/2015 by Gluten-Free Nosh
Matzo balls are a favorite at Passover and any time of the year. But what to do if you are gluten-free and can’t have regular matzo or matzo meal, let alone matzo balls? While some gluten-free matzo ball mixes are available for Passover (my favorite is Lieber’s knaidel mix), they can be hard to find. Inspired by German potato dumplings, this recipe uses potatoes, potato starch and almond meal to make fluffy matzo balls — without the matzo. The result is gluten-free, non-gebrokts knaidlach that are fluffy on the outside, while slightly dense on the inside. Make sure to plan out this recipe in advance, as you’ll need to refrigerate the boiled potatoes ahead of time. A potato ricer works well here to finely shred the cooked potatoes, but you can them well by hand, too. When boiling the matzo balls, do so at a light boil, so vigorous bubbling won’t break up the delicate matzo balls. While you can make the batter ahead of time and keep it in the refrigerator, the matzo balls are best cooked close to serving time.

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Eggplant Roll Ups Recipe Video

 

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Yes, the rumor is true. I did eat 6 of these all by my lonesome when testing the recipe. Now in the interest of full disclosure I ate 3 for breakfast (was a late breakfast, more like brunch) and 3 for lunch (was a late lunch, more like linner). And yes you may have heard that I also fried up some extra eggplant to snack on in between. And while some people may be embarrassed to admit this I think it just proves how much of a winner this recipe really is. So hang on to your hats folks and watch me fry and roll and bake your new favorite Passover and year-round brunch, lunch, linner or dinner dish.


 

Secret Substitutes to Enhance Passover Meals

 

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Passover is a great holiday, it’s fun, family oriented but most of all it can be a lot of work. With all of the eating restrictions sometimes it is hard to find something to eat or serve that everyone will like. I found that there are three secret substitutes that will help you make it through the holiday without missing your favorite non kosher for passover foods.

The first is Cauliflower. It is so versatile and can be used in so many different dishes! Try some of these cauliflower recipes :


 

Kosher Pastured Raised Top of the Rib *Giveaway*

 

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Using only seven ingredients, our signature concept, our Red Wine Top of the Rib recipe is easy to make and is fall-apart delicious! The trick to tenderized, fall-apart meat is to slice it against the grain after the initial cooking process and then to put it back in the oven for a final roast. We highly recommend that you use red wine that you can enjoy after the recipe is complete; try a full flavored wine such as a Merlot or a Shiraz. The red wine adds so much flavor to the recipe and may help to tenderize the meat as well.


 

Passover Refrigerator Stocking Tips

 

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When preparing for Passover one of the most important things we can do is purchase the proper products to stock the fridge. While the holiday is always hectic and draining, make sure to get products that enable you to make quick and delicious dishes.  Instead of dreading the holiday because of all the eating restrictions it poses, buy the products that will keep you and your family happy over Passover.


 

What Are Kitniyot and Gebrokts?

 

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Kitniyot refers to  grains and legumes such as rice, corn, soy beans, string beans, peas, lentils, mustard, sesame seeds and poppy seeds which are traditionally not eaten by Ashkenazic Jews on Passover.

Gebrokts is a yiddish word that refers to matzah that has come in contact with water, many hassidic Jews refrain from eating Gebrokts on Passover.


 

RSVP #Philly4Passover Cheesey Twitter Party

 

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You’re invited to join our #Philly4Passover Twitter chat!

Hosted by @JoyofKosher


 

Roasted Potatoes with a Matbucha Sauce

 

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Roasted Potatoes with a Matbucha Sauce Posted 03/13/2015 by Sina Mizrahi
The Sabra Matbucha provides the perfect flavoring for an easy sauce on Passover or anytime. The flavor really dresses up these simply roasted potatoes, but you can also add some optional extra spice if you’re like me.

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Top 10 Passover Approved Snacks

 

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Need snack Ideas for the holiday? Well we have made a list of our top ten favorite Passover snacks! Whether you are looking for snacks to take for your family trips or are looking for something to munch on during the long Yom Tov days this list will provide you with all the essentials.


 

Pesach/Spring 2015 Issue

 

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Check out our Pesach/Spring issue – 100% Gluten free with recipes for Spring Salads, Spralizing, Poached Fish, Full lamb guide, make ahead ideas for an easier seder, Make your own spices and so much more.
Subscribe now, Get a FREE BONUS issue + be entered to win a messermeister carving set valued at $250








 

How To Make The Best Carb Free Hash

 

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You are probably most familiar with hash browns, the ever favorite, breakfast/brunch potato side popular in diners and restaurants everywhere.  Hash browns refer to any type of pan fried potatoes, usually mixed with onions and seasoning, but there is no strict rule though. As you may have noticed, sometimes hash browns are shredded, sometimes they are diced big or small, but as long as the potatoes are browned in a pan they call them hash browns.  Some places, although less common in kosher places, offer corned beef hash, which is corned beef sautéed with potatoes.  Mike’s Bistro makes a nice version of that dish.  Although traditionally potatoes are used in most hash recipes, there are so many wonderful vegetables that can work in place of the potatoes. Also, it is a great way to use up leftovers.