Home Rotator

 

RSVP #WinnDixieKosher Chanukah Twitter Party

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

You’re invited to join our #WinnDixieKosher Twitter chat!
Hosted by @JoyofKosher and sponsored by @WinnDixie.

We are cleaning our fryers and menorahs and getting ready to #CelebrateDelicious this Chanukah with Winn-Dixie by our side.   Winn-Dixie has over 1,000 kosher products plus many kosher baked goods in most of their stores and Jamie will be in Orlando and Jacksonville sharing latkes donuts with everyone who visits.


 

Free Magazine Subscription For Small Business...

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

We are pleased to offer you a FREE 6 MONTH SUBSCRIPTION TO JOY OF KOSHER WITH JAMIE GELLER MAGAZINE.

Take advantage of the Small Business Saturday (read Motzei Shabbos) Promotion from AMEX.


 

Cooking With Joy: Veal Meatballs

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

I have always kept away from veal. Not for any political reason, just texturally it was never something I was into. My mother has made it a few times, that is how I know it’s not something I like, I have never cooked it.


 

Free 20 Recipe #WinnDixieKosher Chanukah Ebook

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 


 

A Week of Dinners that Make Good Lunches

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Is there a better week to discuss dinners that easily transform into the next day’s lunch? If you are in the midst of preparing for Thanksgiving, cooking for a large crowd, or just planning your weekly meal plan, double duty recipes are budget and life savers.  It makes for a streamlined grocery list and requires less time in the kitchen, plus it is an easy way to ensure that you are eating a real meal more than once a day.  Below are 7 recipes that are delicious for dinner and the next day’s lunch.

 


 

A Kosher KitchenSurfing Dinner To Remember

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Last month Joy of Kosher had the amazing opportunity to partner with KitchenSurfing to promote their new kosher section.  KitchenSurfing is an online service that pairs people with chefs.  Instead of going out to a fancy dinner you can bring the fancy dinner in and the chef can tailor the meal to your exact needs and wants.  The chef will shop, cook, serve and clean up and we got to experience it first hand last month with Chef David Egidio Donagrandi. We ran a contest and invited 5 winners plus guests to join the entire Joy of Kosher team for dinner in Brooklyn.


 

Kosher Sausage Recipe Challenge: Vote and Submit

 

Contributed by:

 

7 comments | Leave Comment

 

KOSHER SAUSAGE & JACK’S GOURMET

In recent years, kosher sausage options have expanded tremendously, due to the diligent work of Chef Jack Silberstein and Dr. Alan Broner, co-founders of Jack’s Gourmet. In 2010, Jack Silberstein, a highly successful chef, introduced a variety of ethnic-flavored sausages to the kosher market. These included Sweet Italian, Hot Italian, Mexican-style Chorizo, Bratwurst and Boerewors. Through the years, Jack’s Gourmet has continued to revolutionize the kosher palate with gourmet offerings such as Facon, Spicy Italian-Style Salami, old-world Corned Beef and Pastrami, and a variety of nitrite-free sausage patties and burgers. The general philosophy of Jack’s Gourmet is to use quality ingredients and avoid gluten, MSG, fillers, byproducts, and artificial ingre- dients, which explains the loyal customers and many accolades the company receives. In line with their mission to continually introduce new flavors to the kosher con- sumer’s palate, Jack’s Gourmet has recently released an all-new flavor which premiered this fall: Beef Merguez Sausage.


 

Betting On Winter Greens

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

Wen I was studying to become a dietitian and cramming for an exam, I followed the mantra “bet on green” whenever I was unsure of an answer on a test. Packed with dozens of vitamins and minerals, it was hard to go wrong then, and even now, I still bet on green. With the winter approaching, most of the colorful tomatoes, corn and squashes begin to disappear off the supermarket shelves, replaced by bright leafy winter greens. Winter greens are green-leafed vegetables, hardy enough to thrive in the colder winter weather. They include chard, collards, mustard greens, escarole, kale and beet greens, among many others. They are loaded with vitamins, minerals and phy- tonutrients, which may help prevent heart disease and cancer.


In 2009, The Center for Science in the Public Interest (a nationally recognized not-for-profit research organization where I used to work) ranked nearly 85 vegetables in order of highest to lowest nutrient content and found kale, spinach, collard greens, turnip greens, and Swiss chard in the top five.


 

Make Desserts Better With One Simple Ingredient

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

I am a simple baker. I don’t make fancy cakes or decorated cookies. You’ll never see my concoctions dressing up a bakery window and I’ve accepted this fact. I make bundt cakes, chewy chocolate chip cookies and yummy brownies. My family loves them, but Paula Shoyer doesn’t have to look over her shoulder.


 

Cook Thanksgiving in an Hour

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

I’m not kidding, it is possible to spend Thanksgiving outside of the kitchen!  Each dish seems to add up to more and more hours in the kitchen, but with a good game plan and the recipes below you will be out of the kitchen and able to enjoy the day.  I’m no miracle worker though, sorry to say that there are no whole roasted turkey recipes here, those actually take a while to cook!  Instead there are plenty of elegant and alternative turkey based options which will make you wonder why you ever bothered cooking the whole bird anyway!

 


 

The Chanukah Issue Makes The Perfect Gift

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

This winter issue is all about Chanukah. Get healthy frying tips and tons of latke recipes. Don’t miss our Doughnut Cookies and gifts for every budget. We go crazy for olive oil and celebrate with a Chanukah party!!  Order 2 subscriptions and get the Joy of Kosher Cookbook as a FREE gift!!


 

Winn-Dixie Kosher Stores Within A Store *Giveaway*

 

Contributed by:

 

72 comments | Leave Comment

 

Check out this video as Jamie takes us through the Kosher Winn-Dixie grocery store in South Florida.

HEYYYYYYYYYY! Watch my #WinnDixieKosher store-within-a-store tour in South Florida. I shopped till I dropped and after eating fresh hot pizza and sushi I capped it all off with a 250+ person demo and book signing in the midst of one of those notorious Floridian torrential downpours!


 

British Savory Pies and Pasties For Thanksgiving

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

Anglo-Jewish history dates back at least a millennium and it is rife with complex twists and turns that are still debated. There are a few things we know for certain: After being (sort of) welcomed in by Norman and Plantagenet rulers in feudal times, significant persecution of Jews began around the late 12th century. They were branded with yellow stars and taxed extensively. They were expelled altogether in the 13th century in a time of religious fervor under the fury of Blood Libels. From then until 1609, there is historical uncertainty about Jews in England, with reports of a few—such as a crypto-Jew (one who had converted and practiced in secret) serving as physician to Henry VIII.  In a twist we certainly didn’t hear about as kids during the telling of the Thanksgiving story, many Puritans were punished for seeming to be “jew-ized” and distinctly pro- Old Testament. The Pilgrim landed on Plymouth Rock in 1620.

But pressure from (mostly Jewish) Spanish and Portuguese traders, the work of  Sephardic Dutch Rabbinical leader Menasseh Ben Israel (who advocated for opening of lands closed to Jews), and the practical politics of the English ruler Oliver Cromwell, led to an invitation for Jews  to return by 1664.  From the Restoration to the Enlightenment and beyond, life became rich for Jews—and not just in London and its environs.

So, for Thanksgiving this year, I decided to take a look at some U.S.–Anglo–Jewish culinary traditions. By and large, English food (notwithstanding Chef Jamie Oliver and Jewish TV chef Nigella Lawson) has always been thought of as bland. Plebeian. And when I lived there, I can tell you that I ate more than my fair share of butter and cucumber sandwiches and egg and chips (aka French fries). The folks at Lutece weren’t worried. But I did have some curious little handheld vegetable pot pies. Those pasties (pronounced PAHS-tees, rhyming with “last” or “past”—not “paste”—with “ease” at the end), were soul warming and easy to eat and carry along. This little pie is not exactly seen as a Jewish food, no doubt, but it’s a fun—and freezable—meal. Once you get the hang of the dough, you can stuff it with almost any stew—and it’s great for leftovers. Freeze them stuffed but unbaked and you’ve got a treat waiting to happen. Pasties, by the way, originated in Cornwall, England, and are believed to have been created for miners who worked under harsh conditions for many hours a day and wanted and needed a meal that would be easy to carry and tidy up. Original pasties featured an inedible dough—so tough that it protected the stew. And it only ever, ever contained beef, turnips, potatoes, and onions. This is such a deep-seated traditional food that, I kid you not, there is a Cornish Pasty Association and it sets rules about this little hand pie.

The rules notwithstanding, I’ve come up with a very American version that takes advantage of turkey, dressing and leftover greens. Keep calm and make hand pies.


 

Just A Pie Full Of Sugar Helps The Medicine Go...

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

The Kosher Connection decided to dedicate this month’s link up to our longtime friend and distinguished Jewish food historian, Gil Marks. Gil has been sick for a while and we want to wish him a refuah shleimah (complete healing). I am sharing my recipe for these mini pies (full of sugar) in hopes to add a little sweetness during this otherwise difficult time. Gil has been an inspiration and a true pioneer. We thank Gil for all his amazing books, writing and teachings over the years and look forward to many more.

I made this recipe as an adaptation to Momofuku’s famous crack pie, I read about online. It is supposed to be so good, that you can’t stop eating it.  I first discovered Momofuku’s recipes when I attempted a new recipe for chocolate cookies that just didn’t really hold together and I ended up with a bunch of chocolate cookie crumbs.  I was able to use those crumbs to make these Chocolate Chocolate Cookies with Cookie Crumbs, which turned out absolutely amazing.  I learned that one of Momofuku’s specialties was using cookie crumbs and cake crumbs in the cookies and cakes.  So, when I found myself with graham cracker crumbs that wouldn’t hold together I knew where to turn.


 

Planning Your Thanksgiving Menu

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Most other food and recipe websites are doing countdowns to Thanksgiving, we save ours for Passover (you can sign up for Passover countdown here).  For everyone else in the world, Thanksgiving, celebrated with a multi-course extravagant meal, is a big to do and requires lots of planning.  For most of us, Thanksgiving is a piece of cake (or maybe pie).  After three day yom tov holidays all throughout October and the cleaning and prepping it takes to celebrate 2 Passover seders, we (I) revel in a day where we can actually cook food the day of serving.