Shabbat

 

Shabbat Menu – Chicken with Golden Raisins...

 

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Gold and silver can be used to make things more beautiful, to show our love and appreciation, like a wedding ring or a special piece of jewelry.  Or gold can blind us with the idolatry of wealth.  In this week’s Parsha, we have a little of both.  B’nai Yisrael are each commanded to each give a half-shekel of silver to help build the Mishkan.  It is a gift from individuals for a holy communal purpose.  But when Moses does not descend from Mount Sinai as fast as the Children of Israel are expecting, the people create a golden calf to worship.  It is a corruption of the very generosity that began our parsha.  Gold can also be the centerpiece of a magnificent Friday night dinner, like our Chicken with Golden Raisins, Green Olives and Lemon recipe.

Fish Soup Provencal

Fish Soup Provencal


 

Shabbat Menu – Olive Oil

 

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To light the eternal flame, the children of Israel are commanded to bring pure oil of olives crushed for lighting.  I use olive oil in most everything. The diversity of flavors – from herbal to earthy can bring out the best of breads, salads, vegetables, fish, poultry and even steaks.  Heart healthy and a staple of the Mediterranean diet, olive oil is a precious part of our Biblical tradition and our culinary heritage.  This week we are highlighting a menu that shows many ways to use the amazing olive and its flavorful oil.

Zaatar and Olive Challah

Zaatar and Olive Challah


 

Shabbat Menu – Chocolate Chip Challah

 

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This week, we move from the ecstasy to the intricate.  From Mount Sinai to the Mishkan in all its glorious detail.  In the Ark there rested the Ten Commandments, protected by two winged cherubim made out of pure gold.  On the outside, the seven-branched menorah and the table where the “showbread” was placed.  When I think of a bread so good that I would leave it outside, next to the Menorah and sitting in the shadow of the Holy Ark, my thoughts turn to this decadent and delicious Chocolate Chip Challah Bread that is as sweet a way to start your meal as it could be to end it!!!

turkey sausage and lentil soup

Turkey Sausage and Lentil Soup


 

Shabbat Menu – Ranch Chicken

 

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In this week’s parsha, we learn of the Torah’s prohibition against eating milk with meat.  It is this historic moment when Joy of Kosher was born, as future generations of Jewish cooks must learn the art of creative kosher cooking.  We don’t mean to “milk” this metaphor, but we “calf” to say that it doesn’t get more creative than this Ranch Chicken recipe.

Non dairy Creamy Carrot Soup

Creamy Carrot Soup


 

Shabbat Menu – Mod Matzo Ball Soup

 

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In Parsha Yitro, Moshe’s father-in-law comes to visit.  And like all in-laws, has some advice for the leader of the Jewish people.  Of course, Yitro is right.  Moses is spending all day standing on his feet judging disputes between neighbors, deciding matters of Jewish law and acting as an intermediary between the Children of Israel and G-d.  This could, as you might imagine, get a little tiring.  Yitro recommends the establishment of a formal legal and judiciary system, providing a lifetime of nachas to future generations of Jewish lawyers (and their parents).   For our Shabbat menu this week, we celebrate the delicate task of judging by picking a few winners of our own for our Shabbat menu, starting with a winning recipe from the Man-o-Manischewitz Cookoff, “Mod” Matzo Ball Soup.

 


 

Shabbat Menu – “Split” Pea Soup

 

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The newly emancipated Hebrew slaves flee Egypt while Pharaoh and his army follow close behind.  Arriving at the Red Sea, the Israelites face a choice.  Turn back? Go forward?  Moses raises his staff and the waters split in two.  According to our Midrash, all the waters in the world divided.  In jars, cups, bowls and the heavenly waters, as well.  For our Shabbat menu this week, it is only fitting to start our meal with a Souped Up Split Pea Soup.

Souped Up Split Pea Soup

Souped Up Split Pea Soup


 

Shabbat Menu – Quick Dark Chocolate Brownies

 

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In this week’s parsha, Egypt ‘s destruction is complete.  The plague of locusts decimates the land, followed by darkness and the death of the firstborn.  The Children of Israel are granted their freedom and begin their long journey to the Promised Land.  In Egypt, the darkness was so thick and unrelenting the Egyptians were immobilized.  For our Shabbat dessert this week, we’re going to introduce a dark chocolate cake so decadent and delicious no one is going to want to get out of their seat either – until after dessert!

Leek and Baby Spinach Soup


 

2 Shabbat Meals in 2 1/2 Hours

 

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An interesting aspect to keeping Shabbat, is that every Shabbat dinner is like the once a year thanksgiving feast that most Americans discuss and plan for weeks in advance. Every week, Jewish men and women cook up a storm to celebrate Shabbat with food, family and friends. Listed below is a step by step guide to help you create a great tasting, and quick Shabbat dinner for eight. Keep in mind that the two and ½ hours include prep work and cooking time too. These recipes aren’t only for Shabbat; you can use the recipes for any occasion.

Shabbat Dinner


 

Shabbat Menu – Crispy Artichoke “...

 

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In this week’s parsha, Moses and Aaron come before Pharaoh and demand their freedom.  Amid signs and wonders, Pharaoh will not acknowledge the sovereignty of any power other than his own.  The Torah recounts that “the heart of Pharaoh was hardened and he would not let the children of Israel go.”  I love this idea of Pharaoh’s hardened heart, refusing to relent as the entire world around him is turned upside down and inside out.  This week we highlight Jamie’s fabulous “hardened hearts” – much easier to swallow, just a few minutes to make and absolutely delicious!

Crispy Artichoke Hearts


 

Shabbat Menu – Asparagus In A Blanket

 

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Floating across the Nile river in a reed basket, a newborn baby boy is spared certain death.  In time, Moshe will move heaven and earth to bring the Jewish people out of slavery and towards the Promised Land and his name will be immortalized for eternity.  But not yet.  This parsha is about hiddenness. From being concealed by his mother Yocheved after his birth to avoid detection by Pharaoh’s midwives, to being shrouded in a basket for his safety, to running in hiding after his defense of the Hebrew slaves, to hearing the voice of Hashem from a Burning Bush, the demand for justice and righteousness doesn’t always shout, it whispers and it is up to us to reveal what is inside. Many people have the custom of marking this week’s parsha by eating Hot Dogs in a Blanket, appropriately called, Moshe Ba’Teiva (Moshe in the Ark).  I am going to recommend a healthier variation that I’ve been making for years, asparagus wrapped in dough — A perfect parsha-friendly appetizer that is destined to become a family favorite. This week we start the book of Shemot and many people have the custom of eating

 


 

Shabbat Menu – Fall Off Bone Lamb Shanks

 

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The Book of Genesis is our story of creation.  As we reach Vayechi (“and he lived”) we turn from the hopeful anticipation of life that greeted us during the opening chapters of the first book, to a reflective, contemplative awareness that we are not immortal and we are judged by what we do during our brief stay on earth.  The death of Jacob and the return of his bones to the Holy Land marks the end of the lives of the patriarchs.  The death of Joseph, with the resulting vow to take his bones from Egypt to the Promised Land, ushers in an era of harsh slavery and oppression, but ultimately redemption.  This week we’ll take bones and transform our Shabbat meal into a celebration of all things meat.

Lo Mein

Not Your Grandma


 

Shabbat Menu – Butternut Squash Soup with...

 

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Revealing himself to his palace guests as their long lost brother, Joseph brings together the Children of Israel.  The emotional reunion is complete when Jacob brings the rest of his family from the Holy Land to settle in Goshen.  The Jews stand out in Goshen, growing in numbers and wealth.  It is said that during the famine, Joseph sustained his father and his brothers and their entire household with bread.  I can’t think of a better way to sustain our Shabbat guests either – you’ll love this savory Butternut Squash Soup with Orange Croutons and a decadent Gingerbread Eggnog Bread Pudding Muffins for dessert.

 


 

Shabbat Menu – The Reliable Roast

 

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Pharaoh dreams of seven fat cows swallowed by seven emaciated cows, and then seven fat stalks of grain swallowed by seven lean stalks of grain.  In one of Joseph’s most evocative interpretations, the forgotten prisoner predicts seven years of plenty followed by seven years of famine.  As we plunge deeper into the harsh cold winter, we’d better stir things up with a hearty Shabbat Mikeitz meal sporting a variety of wild grains and a big, fat juicy steak.

Warm Kamut Salad with Caramelized Squash and Cranberry Fig Chutney

Warm Kamut Salad with Caramelized Squash and Cranberry Fig Chutney


 

Shabbat Menu – Olive Bread

 

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In this week’s parsha we read the remarkable tale of Joseph who ascends from the depths of the pit from which his brothers had originally sentenced him to death to reemerge in Egypt as a master of the house of the wealthy and powerful Potiphar.  Joseph enjoys peace and comfort for only a short time – he is callously sent down into the prison of Egypt’s Pharaoh for resisting the urges of Potiphar’s wife.  Sometimes from the “pits” or depths great things emerge, so too our Shabbat menu.  Bursting with olives, figs, pomegranate and other “pitted” fruit we celebrate a spectacular Shabbat menu with you!


 

Shabbat Menu – Israeli Kebabs with...

 

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As Esau approaches with an army of men, Jacob divides his family and prays for his life.  Separated from his wives and family and all his worldly possessions, Jacob is left all alone on the other side of the River Jabbok.  After wrestling with an angel until the break of dawn, and proving his strength under the most difficult of circumstances, Jacob and the angel reach a stalemate.  Jacob refuses to let go until the angel gives him a blessing – and the angel changes his name to Israel.  In solidarity with our brothers and sisters in Israel, we celebrate our homeland with an Israeli Inspired Shabbat menu.

Spiced Chicken & Lentil Soup with Garlic Toast

Spiced Chicken & Lentil Soup with Garlic Toast