Shabbat

 

Jewish Comfort Food: Chulent Re-Make

 

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Hubby is a shy guy.  Actually, let me restate: Hubby is not a spotlight/limelight kinda dude, more the behind-the-scenes type.  He calls himself the idea man.  And we all laugh about it.  Cause most things that I end up doing are his idea – like writing my first cookbook, making Aliyah and most everything in between.

But he is really really, really, really, funny.  Like crazy funny.  The kids always comment about how much we laugh together and how much fun we have.  We cook together, we clean together (although he would argue he does much of that on his own), we shop together, (except, again, when he is doing that all by his lonesome with a crazy long list from me) and we generally travel as a pair.


 

A Healthier Take on Jewish Classics

 

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There are only a few things more confusing than advice on healthful eating: Paleoists, vegans, carb cyclers, ketone diet adepts, fructarians, vegetarians, flexitarians, doctors, dietitians, trainers, scientists, celebrities, coaches, chefs–and the list keeps going– all state that they’ve found the perfect way to eat, but many of them give opposite recommendations. And then, if we were already confused, there’s kashrut…However, if you look closely, there’s something everyone–including kosher laws–agrees upon: plants are great for us, and they should be the core of our diets.

We don’t normally think of Jewish dietary laws being plant based, however, they do give us plenty of freedom when it comes to the plant world. They also promote moderation with products from the animal kingdom; restricting us on how to obtain, combine and eat them. We do obsess with meat and dairy, however, maybe our eyes should be on the plants, which are pretty much free for all (except for checking them for insects, which are not plants!).


 

A Recipe Inspired By Parshat Bo

 

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At Rosh Hashana, I started a blog, Neesh Noosh: A Jewish Woman’s Year Long Journey to Find Faith in Food. Each week, I create a recipe inspired by the weekly Torah portion and what’s in season at my farmers market.  This week, in Bo, the remaining three plagues—locusts, darkness and the death of first-born sons–are inflicted upon the Egyptians. While Egypt was shrouded in darkness, “all Israelites enjoyed light in their dwellings” (Bo, 10: 23).  How, despite the plagues and the continuing hardening of Pharaoh’s heart, did the Israelites live at the precipice of freedom and eventually gain freedom?

The Sefat Emet teaches that “God had already placed in Egypt hidden treasures that Israel had to take out. . . . When they clarified the lights that came out of such a place, they would go on to live [and shine] throughout the generations.” (The Language of Truth, Translated by Arthur Green, pgs 93-94).


 

A Shabbat Project Breakfast Idea

 

 

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Looking for inspiration for a Shabbos Breakfast? – look no further than these Israeli Breakfast ideas.

Rushed off our feet during the week sometimes makes it impossible to sit down as a family and eat a healthy breakfast together. Let’s really get into the spice and spirit of the promised land, leaving the macon and eggs behind, to enjoy the land of milk and honey in the form of an Israeli breakfast.


 

Caviar For Shabbat

 

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This article is dedicated to my father, who with out fail, reminds me every three day yom tov to do eruv tavshilin.  Eruv Tavshilin refers to the prepared food that is set aside with a prayer before a yom tov, that allows us to cook and prepare foods on a yom tov for Shabbat when Shabbat is the following day.  This is most often necessary when two days of holiday lead into Shabbat as we have been enjoying this year.  Get all the details of Ervu Tavshilin here and don’t worry if you have forgotten or didn’t know about it before, there are many that allow you to rely on the eruv of the Rabbi in the community who will have everyone in mind.

In my family as I am sure in many it is customary to use a hard boiled egg and challah or matzah for the Eruv.  It is easy to eat the bread at any meal, but no one in my family really likes to sit down to a hard boiled egg, that is how I started to serve Caviar on Shabbat.


 

5 Menus for Shemini Atzeres, Simchas Torah, &...

 

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Ok, I admit it, I am guilty of calling every holiday “my favorite holdiay”.  Another confession, I don’t feel all that guilty– I really love everything about the holidays (minus the limits on showering, but let’s not discuss that).  Sukkos is this incredibly festive, yet humbling holiday.   Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah fall right at the end of Sukkos, after Hoshana Rabbah, and are literally, truly, just straight up days of rejoicing.  In gashmius, materialistic, terms: bring on the food!  These 5 menus will leave you full, feeling festive (you may also need a nap) and will motivate you to dance all night (and work off all those calories…sort of kidding!) by Simchas Torah.

 


 

Join Us For The Shabbos Project

 

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Last year The Shabbos Project took South Africa by storm with a weekend dedicated to getting as many people as they could to keep Shabbat from sundown to stars out.  The weekend kicked off with a mass challah baking lead by our dear friend and regular contributor, The Kosher Butcher’s Wife, Sharon Lurie.

The Great Challah Bake


 

10 All-Time Favorite, Healthy, and Fancy Kugel...

 

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Kugel seems like a minhag, a tradition, for many families, although it’s not actually compulsory for the holiday celebration!  This is because kugels are such a treat 1) to eat  and 2) to make in advance and freeze.  If you haven’t yet experimented with making some of kugels below, now is a great time to experiment before the height of holiday cooking season is underway.  Below are just a few of the many  kugel recipes on the site (we have almost 100!); for more great ideas check out all of the great new recipes in the latest issue of Joy of Kosher Magazine.  What’s your favorite kugel recipe to serve at the holidays? Please share below!

 


 

The Great Shabbat Menu

 

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This week is Shabbat Hagadol (translated as the great Shabbat), it is the Shabbat that precedes Passover and is connected to the miracles that happened in Egypt.  Since this Shabbat falls so close to Passover, many homes are already kashered and we are tasked to create a fabulous meal without any bread or any matzo.  Hopefully you will be able to get some Challah to enjoy and then try this menu that can be made before, during and after Passover and still be considered great.

Salad with Pastrami Croutons

Spring Salad with Pastrami Croutons and Balsamic Reduction


 

Shabbat Menu – A Clean New Year

 

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This week in parsha Tazria we continue reading about the laws purity, but it also happens to be Shabbat Hachodesh.  The Shabbat before the first of Nissan, which is considered the first month of the Jewish calendar.  At the same time Spring is in the air and we are cleaning our homes and preparing for the holiday of Passover.  Let’s start the new year off with clean and homes and clean bodies.  This week’s menu features clean healthy foods that have no processed ingredients.

Indian Inspired Salmon Cakes


 

Shabbat Menu – Purity and The Red Heiffer

 

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From the rejuvenating waters of the mikvah, to the memory of Miriam’s triumphant dancing after the splitting of the In this week’s Parsha Shmini we read of the purifying power of water and it is the first time we read in specific detail the kosher dietary laws concerning what animals are permissible and prohibited, the criteria for kosher fish and birds and a list of kosher insects (yuck!). This week is also called Shabbat Parah, the Shabbat of the red heifer, which describes the ways in which we purified ourselves to being to prepare for Passover. These days we are purifying our homes by purging them of chametz and so we will eat a chametz filled menu featuring the Red Heiffer.

vegetable barley soup

Vegetable Barley Soup


 

Shabbat Menu – Remembering

 

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This week’s parsha describes the laws and responsibilities of the kohanim, the holy priests.  The kohanim keep the fire on the altar burning constantly, from morning until night.  There is also the special Shabbat Zachor reading where we remember the attack of Amalek as we draw closer to the holiday of Purim.  In the spirit of remembering we will share a menu filled with Omega-3 fats, which have brain boosting powers.

Sesame Soy Salmon

Sesame Soy Salmon


 

Shabbat Menu – Eating The Clouds

 

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Finally, the Mishkan has been built and Aaron and his sons officially are anointed priests.  A cloud appears over the Mishkan to signify the divine presence.  To celebrate the completion of the Mishkan and the second book of the Torah we will rejoice with a cloud like dessert, Meringues.  You can make cookies, pavlova, pies or this amazing creation, the Baked Alaska!

wild rice chicken soup

Wild Rice Chicken Soup


 

Best Recipes for Shabbat Lunch

 

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The Shabbos lunch menu must feature make-ahead dishes that can withstand the oven-to-fridge-to-hot-plate-to-table cycle with leftovers returning right back to that revolving refrigerator door. Follows are a few of my secrets to Shabbos lunch success.

First thing’s first, the first course. I sometimes serve a bang it out starter akin to the last supper. You’d think that I think that we’re never gonna eat again. But I feel the first course is the most Shabbos lunch friendly and when done right allows to you to satiate the hungry humans around your table and simplify the main – which by all accounts is certainly the trickier of the two.


 

The Shabbat After Thanksgivukkah

 

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This Shabbat we celebrate the third night of Hanukkah and it is also the day after the American holiday of Thanksgiving.  In this week’s parsha, Pharaoh dreams of seven years of plenty, followed by seven years of hunger.  After (at least) seven courses of Thanksgiving bounty, there is  undoubtedly an abundance of leftovers in our refrigerator this week. So we remake the plenty from the night before for a completely original  Shabbat Hanukkah menu that will feed your hungry family and guests.

Sweet Potato Soup with Sweet Potato Chips

Sweet Potato Soup with Sweet Potato Chips