Passover Seder Recipes

 

First Seder in the Homeland

 

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Mivasseret Zion, Israel (April 2, 2012) — The little girls stood on stage holding up a child’s painting of the Ten Commandments, quietly but confidently singing “Who Knows One,” the traditional Passover song about Jewish icons such as the Five Books of Moses, the Four Matriarchs, the Three Patriarchs, the two Tablets that Moses brought from Mount Sinai, and the Oneness of God.

It could have been a scene from any number of school Passover presentations, but these children were new immigrants to Israel from Ethiopia, demonstrating their Jewish knowledge for family members who, with them, are about to celebrate their first Passover in Israel.


 

Seder Night Checklist

 

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On the Ka’ara—The Seder Plate

Matzahs—3 Whole


 

Saturday Night Seder Menu

 

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This year the second seder falls on Motzei Shabbat.  That means we really have to get everything ready early.  Usually we can cook on yom tov to prepare for the second night, but this year, we do not have that luxury.  I have been asked by a few people for good recipes to serve for the second seder considering the limiations.  My first thought is brisket, the classic seder recipe that is even better the next day, but you can really do any braised meat, short ribs, osso bucco, beef stew, even the ones with flour should work well with out it or you can use matzo meal to coat the meat when necessary.  After that comes a saucy chicken that won’t dry out when reheated.  Kugels are always good and so are the soups.  Here is a new menu that won’t take too much time to prepare.


 

Do It Yourself Crafts for Your Seder

 

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For every Jewish holiday there are loads of crafts we can make with our kids or even on our own as adults.  It is fun to have our personalized items to use and our friend, Sarah Dahan, from CreativeJewishMom.com always has a amazing ideas.  Look through your collection and see what might be missing or which item has seen a better year.  You will find links to all of these crafts at the bottom of this page.  And don’t miss our Makot Matching Game.

Maybe it is time to make a gorgeous Bejeweled Wine Glass for Eilayu you can even dress up your regular wine glasses this way.


 

A Chinese Seder

 

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Last year was my first year hosting a Passover Seder.  We finally live walking distance to my brother and his family and it allowed us the opportunity to be together and trade nights.  They hosted the first night and we hosted the second.  In the past, when we all went to my Abba’s house, we would complain about the turkey and brisket he made every year, even when it was delicious (which it usually was).  “Try something new,” we would whine.  He replied, “you will see how hard it is to try something new when you have 6 house guests for a 3 day Yom Tov including two Seders and no one living in town to help with the cooking.”  Okay, point taken.

I don’t have house guests and only have to host one Seder, so that means I can get creative.  Especially since I had the second night, I wanted to make sure I made something different from my sister-in-law, who is a very hard act to follow anytime of year.   Instead of negotiating, I created this amazing Chinese feast that I knew would be one of a kind.  (note – they now make kosher for passover no-soy soy sauce)


 

Seder Tablescape

 

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Dear Joy of Kosher readers,

On Passover, we strive to whip up the perfect hametz-free gourmet menu which a huge feat right after we survive meticulously scrubbing of every inch of our homes. With just a little bit of planning and imagination, we can save some energy to create our own unique Passover seder tablescapes which serves as an elegant backdrop for our delicious Passover meals.


 

Passover Seder Makot Matching Game

 

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The plagues with which the Egyptians were punished because they would not allow the Jews to leave Egypt are called the makot.  This fun matching game will help children remember the names of the plagues as well as what happened to the Egyptians during that time.  This game is quick and easy to make as well as to play. Laminating the cards will make them more durable; this can be done at a local copy shop.

Makot Matching Game


 

Jamie’s Greatest Passover Hits

 

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I can’t believe it.

Really I am in total denial.  Although I did tell my 2 year old — who doesn’t listen much anyway — not to run around the house with a slice of bread in his hand.


 

Conversations at Levana’s Passover Table

 

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What is your favorite part of Pesach?

Well, when all is said and done, who could resist a spic and span house, full of gorgeous flowers, wonderful food and interesting people? Typically, many of our Seder guests are sort of “blind dates”, people who are sent by friends or by our schul, who have no idea how to make their own seder but would love to be in a good traditional home. It’s always great to see that people who you would think are  far removed from everything just love the closeness and togetherness. Many of them come back to us regularly.


 

Kosher Wine from Israel for Passover

 

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This year, I propose a slight variation on the now familiar refrain that closes each Passover Seder. Before you pour one of the four cups of wine at your Seder meal, stand up and proudly declare: “Next wine from Jerusalem!” I guarantee your guests will not be disappointed.

Two thousand years before grapevines were planted in the venerable wine regions of France and Italy, wine was being produced in the land of Israel. Visiting one of the 250 wineries scattered throughout the country is a lesson in tradition meeting technology. Winemaking in Israel is both art and science, with plenty of help from nature. Boasting dry, hot summers, a short wet winter, occasional frost and cold Negev nights, Israel has the potential to become one of the premier wine growing destinations in the world.


 

Plan for Pesach

 

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As we celebrate Passover, we are immersed in many time-honored customs. Special holiday traditions are reserved just for this time of year, such as the seder plate, the four glasses of wine, the many different foods, and the reading from the hagaddah. The four questions echo the beautiful sound of Pesach around the table while bringing family, friends and often strangers to a spiritually closer place.

The serene vision of a family table really makes for a beautiful picture. However, behind the scenes and before everyone sits down to the seder, reality produces a different picture altogether. To the shopper and the homemaker, I have one thing to say to you: You know what I’m talking about! The chaos, the cost, and the craziness in the kitchen associated with Passover can be overwhelming.


 

Free Yourself With 2 Perfect Passover Menus

 

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On Passover, Jewish families all over the word gather together for a Seder.  Although our customs and traditions may vary across time zones and continents, we share our love of food and family.  Many people won’t serve roasted meat or poultry at their Seder, to avoid the appearance that they are replacing the paschal lamb, which was roasted over an open fire.  Some serve an egg at the beginning of the meal to symbolize life and Spring.  Karpas is usually represented by any number of leafy greens, but depending on your particular geography or family history can even be a potato or onion.

Here are a couple inspired menu ideas for Passover that just may start a new food tradition for your family.


 

Sensational Seder Side Dishes

 

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There may be no meal as important, or as stressful, as a Passover Seder. The planning, cleaning, preparation, buying kosher for Passover – and let’s not forget we still have to make the food taste good! In spite of these restrictions, it is possible to create a delicious and memorable Passover meal. Maybe the best parts of that meal (and a leading cause of Seder Stress) are the Seder Side Dishes.

Everyone I know comes around this time of year asking for my advice on how to spice up their Seder Side Dishes. And who could blame them? Some of these dishes have been around for thousands of years! They’re tired of the same old things – the tzimmis, the kugel, the soggy salads – they crave something new, something interesting.


 

The Ultimate Seder Checklist

 

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So picture this…

I am married for three years and had yet to make a Pesach Seder. Each year, we had been able to go to a relative or a hotel, where someone else did all the cooking and Passover prep. I was living in a fool’s paradise, but I didn’t know it.


 

My Big Fat Bulgarian-Iraqi-Canadian-Sefardi Seder

 

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Rice on Passover? That’s just the way Sefardis roll!

Longer days, melting snow and the Stanley Cup playoffs all heralded the coming of spring where I grew up . But for my sisters and me, it was my father’s declaration that he and my mother were going to get fresh maple syrup that proved that winter had finally passed. Maple syrup is a key ingredient in my mother’s special charoset, so we knew that Passover was just around the corner.