Passover Seder Recipes

 

5 Passover Dairy Desserts

 

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In my house, we eat 80% vegetarian. I serve lots of vegetables, beans and lentils and of course, plenty of cheese. On Passover, our two seder meals tend to be very meat heavy, and of course, you have to finish the leftovers!  By the time Chol Hamoed comes around, I am more than ready to go back to fish and vegetable dishes and start enjoying some fabulous dairy desserts!


 

Vegan Mains Perfect For Passover

 

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Every year I get a few comments on my article, A Very Vegetarian Passover, which is a guide for vegetarians and vegans and those that host them.  The recipes are great, but tend to be a bit on the side dish variety.  Most vegans are used to sticking with the sides and most hosts don’t have time to bother to make more, but in response to a few requests for more main dish type vegan Passover recipes, I have developed a few.


 

Free Passover Seder Recipe Ebook

 

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Toasted Almond Milk and Au Creme Passover Dessert

 

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In my continual quest for food worth every bite, I love to explore the entire culinary world and create unified Seders reminiscent of a specific time and place in Jewish history. This year my theme will be the French countryside. Not exactly associated with Pesach, I know, but Rashi was there, so for me, it works. I wanted to make a no-bake, pareve pot au crème that is simple and has the texture of the creamiest pudding you’ve ever had.

Pot au crème, or pot of cream, is a traditional French dessert that has been found as early as Medieval times. It is a custard cooked in a water bath, or bain marie. The cups used have a history all their own–they were often made of the finest porcelain with either one or two handles and small fitted cover on top. I inherited two sets of Passover dishes but alas, none include a dainty pot au creme set, so I make due with some sturdy tea cups.


 

The Kosher Butcher Wife’s Favorite Passover...

 

 

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As a proud South African, this Pesach, my Seder theme is ‘Out of Egypt into Africa’. This year all the beautiful inherited Pesach crockery will be used after the Seder. Last week our Rabbi gave a shiur on the importance of keeping the children entertained during the Seder. After all isn’t it their night too? How right he is. I can still remember, as a child, falling asleep under the dining room table only to be woken up by the lebberdikke thumping on the table when ‘Echad Mi Yodeiyah’ was sung. So this year it’s an African themed Seder where table decor will be combinations of white linen, leopard print embossed hessian overlays, white miners lanterns filled with African daisies, Wee Willie Winkie candle holders, tin plates and cups, wooden serving spoons, wooden matzah boxes and a very special carved wooden seder plate.


 

101 Passover Recipes

 

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Last year one of my friends posted a picture of her Passover preparations with the comment: “slaves in mitzrayim (Egypt), now slaves in the kitchen”.  Passover has some of the most difficult holiday preparations, but the hard work comes with great reward.  Every year we remind ourselves of the foundation of our people, the themes of oppression and liberation.  All of the hard work does take its toll but when everything is ready and we’re finally at the seder, we can truly begin to understand the feeling of liberation.

That being said, the key to Passover preparations is organization and planning. With so many meals to organize it makes it that much easier to have all of your go-to recipes in one place, which is why here at Joy of Kosher we wanted to present a thorough list of of some of our best recipes. Below are 101 Passover recipes, if you would like more ideas please check out the rest of our Passover ideas here.


 

9 Favorite Seder Mains – Chicken and Beef...

 

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ONLY 3 DAYS LEFT TO GET THE JOY OF KOSHER COOKBOOK WITH 70 PASSOVER RECIPES FOR 40% OFF – USE COUPON CODE JOK40 AND ORDER NOW!

Here go my favorite Seder Mains


 

Cooking A Whole Brisket Overnight Is Perfection

 

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It took me a long time to love brisket. It’s the kind of meat that can be dry, stringy and hard-to-chew if you don’t cook it right.

My mother-in-law changed my mind. Unlike my mom, who insisted on using the first-cut portion, my mother-in-law clued me in to the second cut, which is more flavorful. Yes, it has a lot of fat but most of it melts away during cooking. Besides, it’s the fat that softens and enriches the meat as it cooks.


 

A Spanish Seder Menu

 

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I love ethnic food. Well, okay, I love all food, but I have a special place in my heart for creating menu based on a specific international cuisine. So a few years ago when I found kosher for Passover soy sauce I created a Chinese Seder. It got rave reviews and has become a new family tradition. Last year, I had to host two Seders, so I was looking for something new and decided to try Spanish food and it worked beautifully!

saffron-matzo-ball-soup-with-sofrito

Saffron Matzo Ball Soup With Sofrito


 

Passover Seder Recipes

 

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When it’s time for Shulchan Orech, the meal of the Passover seder, these stove top mains (and roasted sides) make a perfect main course

During Passovers of long ago, the Jews would bring the Pesach sacrifice at the Beit Hamikdash, and then roast and eat the meat for the Seder meal. Today, many of us refrain from roasting meat at the Seder so no one should think that we are trying to replace the Pesach sacrifice. These three Quick & Kosher entrees cook completely immersed in liquid. To complete the main course, we leave the roasting for the veggies.


 

Recipes For A Moroccan Seder

 

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Passover is my gastronomic week.


 

Passover Seder Plate Infographic

 

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Source: http://www.sukkahworld.com/Passover-Seder-Guide.asp


 

Passover Seder Salad Recipes

 

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Cooking for Passover is a challenge. Even before the cooking, actually. First there’s the cleaning and getting ready for the holiday. Then the shopping. Then the cooking.

We all know the rules. We can’t use this or that ingredient. None of our favorite breads or pasta or beans and such. Spices and other ingredients difficult to find Kosher-for-Passover. So, when added to the usual kashruth restrictions, minding all of these extra considerations for 8 days can feel daunting.


 

Deviled Egg Recipes To Change Up Your Seder

 

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The seder plate contains 6 symbolic foods: maror (bitter herb), charoset, chazeret (“lettuce”), karpas (vegetable), z’roa (shank bone), and beitzah (egg). The egg is
unique because to me, it is the most far removed from exact events that happened during the time of the exodus. The egg is on the plate to commemorate the festival
sacrifice that was brought to the Temple in Jerusalem, and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Passover night. However, the symbolism of the egg is deeper than just
this.

An egg is the first food a mourner eats when he or she returns from a funeral, which is why it is brought for the festival offering instead of meat. This is to evoke the
idea of mourning over the loss of the Temple. The reason that the egg is a symbol of mourning is that it is a round food, which symbolizes the circle of life.


 

Passover Prep – The Seder Plate

 

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The highlight of the Passover holiday is the Seder. The Seder is a ritual meal at which we read the Haggadah – a book that sets out the order for this Passover meal. (Seder means order).

The Seder plate traditionally has small bowls / plates of the food items used and referenced to in the reading of the Haggadah. These are the items on it: