Purim

 

Purim DIY packaging Ideas

 

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I am not the most creative person nor am I really very artistic, but I sure do appreciate the beautiful work of others.  I know the way I love to make delicious treats others like to create cute little containers to package them in.  Does anyone want to partner? I will make the treats and you make the packaging?  Let me know.

Anyways, over the past few months I realized that we can get so many great ideas for our Purim Mishloach Manot from everyone else’s holiday packages.  Take a look at some inspiring ideas and let me know if you decide to use one and when you will be sending them over.


 

Asian Themed Mishloach Manot

 
 

Purim is around the corner and we’ve been thinking about Mishloah Manot for a while. Since we are always craving sushi what better idea than to share it with our friends, add few orange quarters, an almond cookie, miso soup on the side and the opportunities for brachas add up.

Start with the freshest sushi-quality salmon for the sushi or you can use mock crab like in the picture above, but what about all the essential accoutrement? There are many options. You try to order them on-line, but they come in boxes of 200. We suggest you start in your refrigerator, there are always extra when ordering sushi or Chinese takeout, see if you have a stash or go on and get takeout now to stock up.   If you need more, just walk into your favorite Asian restaurant and see if they’ll sell you a few packets of soy sauce for you Mishloach Manot. If they have the wasabi and pickled ginger, too, even better, but that can be found at most kosher markets.


 

Healthy Mishloach Manot Ideas

 

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Purim is one of my favorite Jewish holidays.  I love baking hamantashen with my kids.  I have so many special memories baking with my mom and grandmother as a child.  After college, I had a tradition to bake hamantaschen with my friend Arlene, who now lives in Israel. One day I hope to resume that tradition, but for now my baking team consists of three children, ages seven, five and three.

Each year my kids are very excited to show off the new Purim costumes their grandmother bought them.  They wear the Purim costumes to shul, to school and usually to some other Purim carnival or festival.  They also begin to strategize how and where they will hoard their candy.  They tear open every package with excitement and pick out their favorite items to stash away.  All my kids have their own hidden treasure of refined sugar and high fructose corn syrup. Dentists everywhere must love this holiday!


 

Dress Up Yourselves and Your Table with These Easy...

 

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Dressing up on Purim is so much fun and something most children look forward to the entire year. Use these instructions to create an array of hats and accessories to enhance a variety of costumes.  In the time it takes to say “abracadabra” (okay, just a bit longer than that) you can craft a cape worthy of any good king, queen, or “magician.”  The most incredible part is that it’s done with no needle and thread involved. How’s that for a Purim miracle!

Crown

Materials


 

Ask the Rabbi – What is Purim?

 

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After the destruction of the first temple in Jerusalem, Nebuchadnezer exiled the Jews from the land of Israel and many ended up in Persia, in the city of Shushan. According to many opinions the city is now called Hamadan, where the burial sites of Esther and Mordechai still exist and are visited by Jews every year on Purim till this day.

The leader of that time was someone by the name of Achashverosh. He was a dictator who had risen up militarily, but had taken a wife for himself of royal blood by the name of Vashti, in order to consolidate his power. Achashverosh throws a six month party to celebrate his third year in power and in a drunken state, has Vashti killed after she refuses to dance for him and his henchmen in her royal crown….only her royal crown.


 

Purim Recipes – Treats Beyond Belief

 

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Purim for me elicits many colorful and joyful memories, but none as strong as the faces of happy children with their mishloach manot, “goodie” baskets traditionally given to friends and family for this holiday. In the Sephardic tradition, the delivery of mishloach manot by children parallels a custom in Chinese culture for Chinese new year; upon receiving their baskets, the recipients shower the lucky curriers with coins!

Depending on your family customs, Purim baskets may contain any number of different things. Halakha dictates that the items given must be portable, and that the package must contain two different types of food. Fruits and nuts are popular items, of course, but, these days, anything goes! Depending on your tradition (or your predisposition for culinary adventures), these mishloach manot can span the spectrum of simple to gourmet, and everything in between. An Ashkenazi must-have is Hamantaschen, filled, triangular cookies, while Sephardim enjoy baklava, Orejas de Haman, and even burekas. While it’s best to fill your baskets with your tried and true family favorites, it’s always fun to add a little zest of something new. Why not give some of these festive, non-traditional items a try?


 

Take Down the Carbs This Purim

 

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Purim is a very special day and is certainly more than fireworks and candy bars. The mitzvah of Mishloach manos is a unique mitzvah that has gotten a bit out of hand. Where is the source that requires Mishloach manos to have as much refined sugar and carbs as possible!!

As parents, we want every Yom Tov to be special for our families. Since Purim centers on so much eating in one day, it might take a bit of serious determination and foresight to make it as healthy and meaningful as possible. The same goes for Seuadas Purim–Join our campaign against Purim carbohydrate-overload and make this important day a time of fun, and a healthy and good example for the entire family!


 

5 Salad Ideas for Your Seudah

 

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On Purim day, this year falling on March 8th, 2012, we all sit down to a big feast, a Seudah.   This festive meal is a great time to experiment and have fun.  In the Purim issue of Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller, Jamie shares 4 new creative salad recipes to start off your seudah either on their own or even as a salad buffet.  We have even more salad recipes here on JoyofKosher.com it is hard to sort through them all.  Since a lot of us like to go global with our Seudah menus I figured I would showcase 5 salads from around the world. I hope you find one or more that you like.

If you are in the mood to travel to Italy, you can try this White Bean Salad given to us by Chef Jeff Nathan of Abigael’s.


 

Vegan Pie Pops From Hannah

 

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Hamentaschen are in-arguably the dessert du jour for Purim, but that doesn’t mean that there’s no room for creative interpretation.  Iron out the corners, add a lollipop stick handle for grab-and-go fun, and you’d get these stunningly simple Pie Pops.  Between the tender crust and fruity center, what are they but miniature, triangular pies, after all?

Familiar fillings with small twists liven up the standard pastry, sure to satisfy the traditional and adventurous palate alike. Not to mention, the downsized format is perfect for portion control.  Right at home in a basket of mishloach manot, recipients both young and old alike can find flavors to enjoy.


 

Printable Purim Cards for Every Style

 

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Finally! Download & Print Your Purim Cards.  There’s one to suit your style. (more…)


 

Purim Seudah Menus From All Around The Globe

 

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Jamie shares her mix and match Global menus, Mexican, Italian and Chinese in this month’s issue of Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller.  (more…)


 

Jams, Salsas and Chutneys **GIVEAWAY**

 

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Jams, salsas and chutneys add zing to even the most boring foods. Though they originated in different parts of the world (England, Mexico and India respectively), they are all essentially sauces made from fruits, vegetables or herbs and/or spices. It seems that in every culture there’s a need to spice up food with something gooey. They all belong to the same family, so to speak – and I love family (even more than I love food).


 

Perfect Purim Wines

 

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Q. What wines do you recommend for Purim and why?
A. Light semi-dries for the day and try to stick with low alcohols like Bartenura Moscato, W wines, Carmel Moscato and the new Gamla Moscato. This is what you serve those that come in out to drop off shlach manot etc …..but of course NEVER GIVE ANY WINE TO ANYONE WHO IS DRIVING OR UNDER 21 YEARS OLD!!! For the seudah, three drier but lighter wines-  Pinot Noir from Barkan, Baron Herzog Chardonnay or Ramon Cordova Rioja (Spain). There are also new very delicious reserves from Israel – Binyamina or Gamla Wineries.

Q. Do you have a drinking game plan you can suggest/map out for folks who want to fulfill the mitzvah but don’t want to feel sick?
A. Stay away from overly sweet wines – the sugar alone will get you sick. If you intend to drink a lot stretch it out over the entire day, not all at once. Bear in mind “alcohol is alcohol, mixing is what’s bad” is a myth. Total consumption is what counts. One shot of whiskey is equivalent to one glass of wine is equivalent to 12 ounces of beer or light wine ie Bartenura.


 

Purim Confessions – Win an “Oh Nuts&...

 

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So I don’t really like hamantashen – but don’t worry, that’s not my confession of the week. My real secret is that …drum roll… I have yet to master making hamantashen. In fact, I have almost given up on it.

I am not sure which came first – my dislike of this particular pastry, or my failure to bake a decent batch. I have been delicately and creatively avoiding the need to make them all these years after my one failed attempt. Yet, if you can believe it, I only tried once. One Purim I tried a recipe from a very reputable cookbook that shall remain nameless. It was not a very good dough, even after two tries, and the taste was worse than the stuff from the bakery, so I just gave up.


 

Purim Panic!!!

 

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Dear Jamie,
Purim starts right after Shabbat is over and I am so panicked! How I am going to get everything done for the seudah, what with cleaning up from Shabbat and all? Is there any way to prepare in advance? What advice can you give me to keep my cool and stop my panic?
Thanks,
Heather in Toronto

Dear Heather,
First, breathe! Remember that we’re all in the same boat, and breathe again. Seriously — it can be done. After all, you’ve done harder things than this – like a three-day Yuntif. Unlike Shabbat or Yom Tov, on Purim you have the opportunity to serve fresh food, right out of the oven, the way it was meant to taste. Every cook who has slaved over a meal knows that value here. This is our dream, and we get to live it on Purim.