Passover

 

Rolled Recipes for Passover

 

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At every holiday meal, there are the “wow” dishes that steal the show and showcase your efforts and talents as the cook. This beautiful dishes offer that perfect pizzazz, using the same minimal ingredients many of us are accustomed to cooking with on Pesach.

mashed ptoato beef roll ups

Mashed Potato Beef Roll Ups


 

Passover Holiday Memories *Giveaway*

 

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Memories can be quite powerful, food memories all the more so. When I use a spice my grandfather often used, or smell a cake like one my grandmother used to bake, I’m there in an instant, right in their kitchen. When Pesach comes, I close my eyes and I can see my grandfather eating matzah with a schmear of whipped cream cheese, a hot mug of sweet creamy coffee beside him.

That is Passover to me:  exactly that vision, that aroma, that taste.


 

Spring Salad Recipes For Passover

 

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In this month’s issue of Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller we celebrate Spring with salad.  As all the green starts to come back on the trees so to shouldn’t we bring it back on our plates.  We have lots of fantastic salads on this site actually over 600, but for the purposes of this post we will share a few that are kosher for Passover.  It is interesting to learn how many recipes have mustard in them, you can adapt many of them to work for Passover, but below are 5 salads that celebrate Spring and Passover.

shaved-asparagus-salad

Shaved Asparagus Salad with Pecorino


 

Charoset Recipes

 

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Charoset Recipes for you to try, tell us which one you make and share your own special recipe with us by submitting it here.

Everyone has a favorite and it is actually the most versatile food on the Seder plate and no matter how you make it there is no denying it goes well on a piece of matzah.  It is fun to try a few recipes, so take a look and find something different.


 

Passover In Israel – Chol Hamoed Activities

 

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Raise your hand if the announcement, “Mommy, I’m bored!” makes you cringe. Yeah, we’re waving our hands, too. That’s why we prepare fun lists of things to do on Chol Hamoed for guests at our Pesach hotels in Israel. Here we share some of them with you:

rosh hanikra israel travel


 

Saying Goodbye to Passover

 

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Passover is almost over.  Just two more days of Yom Tov and we will be back to our full kitchen and pantry — or at least an empty pantry ready to be filled with fresh chametz.  Don’t let your lessons learned from this Passover go to waste.  Whether you will host Seder night again next year or don’t want to think about hosting for another five years, making some notes now will help you later.

I have a confession.  I am not the most organized person in the world.  I am not even the most organized person in my family.  So I am writing this action plan to help me at least as much as help you.  I remember a few years ago when I was in Florida with family for Pesach, I visited my friend Maxine who always had the best leftovers.  They were usually better than whatever I had fresh the night before in my house (no offense to my father’s very good food).  Maxine also happens to be my cooking inspiration and she showed me her Passover binder.  Organized by year and Seder night, filled with menus and recipes and lots and lots of notes, Maxine is compiling a Passover guide for the perplexed.  Every year she writes down her guest list, her menus and her recipes and then comes back to it after the first days are over to rate which recipes were winners and which were best to pass over for next year.  Some recipes would be better if only they had some added “fill in the blank” and she even writes which families didn’t get along so well so she would know to invite them to different nights next year.  At the end of Passover, Maxine would list all her pots, pans, dishes, and serving utensils that she would want to buy for next year. Maxine would also write down how many boxes of matzo they went through, what spices they used and should buy again, etc.


 

Cheesey Matzah Dishes

 

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Just because it’s Pesach does not mean that we cannot have lasagna or pizza – it just means we have to make them differently. Using matzah instead of noodles or pizza dough is a genius idea – I have tasted some Matzah Lasagnas and Pizzas that are out of this world. How do you use matzah to replicate chametz dishes?

Enjoy these recipes:


 

Chol Hamoed Breakfast, Snacks, and Lunch

 

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We’ve cooked and cooked to prepare for Pesach—but now it’s the first morning of chol hamoed, and our families begin to roll back into the kitchen. They want to eat again! Serving refreshing, filling, and light Pesach breakfast and lunches—while offering variety—can be almost as big of a challenge as preparing yesterday’s yom tov feast.

From filling and hearty breakfasts, to easy-to-pack take-along lunches for chol hamoed outings, to the snacks that tide them over until dinner, these Pesach solutions will satiate your family from dawn to dusk.


 

Five Compote Recipes

 

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Most people only eat compote on Passover. Maybe because it’s so much easier to make it for dessert than to patchke with 5 dozen eggs and potato starch? It is so wonderful to have the house smelling of fruit and cinnamon. Nothing like it.  There was even a whole food holiday devoted to it last month – National Fruit Compote Day, check out the article for fun facts about this French dessert.  Here are five fabulous compote recipes, but they are so versatile – how do you compote?

Dried Fruit Compote 


 

How Do You Like Your Matzo?

 

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There are so many ways to eat matzo.  Plain, covered in cream cheese, butter, jelly, a combination of all three, crumbled up, dipped, and more.  Everyone has their special Pesach favorite.

For me, there is something about cream cheese on one half and salted butter on the other and then another slice with just jelly for dessert.  Well, that is what I did when I was a little kid, so I guess it is comfort food now.   My new tradition is homemade chocolate hazelnut spread on the matzo, my kids are really into this one.


 

Refreshed! Chol Hamoed Dinners

 

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After days of heavy yom tov eating, our stomachs and taste buds are likely craving lighter fare. These wholesome dairy, pareve, and meat options offer a refreshing change of pace—and are easy to prepare after a busy day.

Eggplant Parmesan Stacks


 

Tips For The Perfect Matzo Brei

 

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Once we’ve gotten ourselves past the Seder accoutrements ~ the ceremonial foods, the hearty meal and the sweet desserts, we can look forward to some of the other holiday treats.  In my household, running a close second to the chocolate covered matzo, is matzo brei.  Matzo brei is the quintessential Passover brunch food; although it’s just as appreciated as a light dinner, too.

Loosely translated, matzo brei is matzo fried with eggs.  And while that is often the case, it can be so much more!  For instance, is your favorite style more matzo than egg, like a pancake; or is it more egg than matzo ~ frittata style?


 

15 Passover Potato Recipes

 

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Whenever you talk about Passover cooking, everyone groans and says they are so sick of potatoes. But potatoes on Passover don’t have to be boring. The average American eats about 140 lbs of potatoes every year – that’s a lot. But just think – potatoes can be mashed and fried, boiled and grilled, chipped and chopped. Raw or cooked – everyone enjoys potatoes in their diets.

Here are some great Passover Potato recipes:


 

Happy Passover and Happy 1 Year Anniversary!!!

 

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If I actually had any energy left after all this prep and work that I had to wrap before Yuntif, I would find the right words to thank you all and wish you the best of the best this Pesach.

It really is such a truly happy occasion and I am looking forward to it this year in a way that I can’t remember from past years.  Maybe its because it’s my 5th year making Pesach and I’ve learned to chill a bit, maybe it’s because we only have a 2 day yuntif (in the US), or maybe it’s because we have a full week of chol hamoed without a shabbos in between to break up the family plans and add to the cooking load.  I am not sure if it’s one or all of those things or the fact that as my kids grow older I so look forward to enjoying the seder along with them.


 

Deviled Egg Recipes To Change Up Your Seder

 

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The seder plate contains 6 symbolic foods: maror (bitter herb), charoset, chazeret (“lettuce”), karpas (vegetable), z’roa (shank bone), and beitzah (egg). The egg is
unique because to me, it is the most far removed from exact events that happened during the time of the exodus. The egg is on the plate to commemorate the festival
sacrifice that was brought to the Temple in Jerusalem, and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Passover night. However, the symbolism of the egg is deeper than just
this.

An egg is the first food a mourner eats when he or she returns from a funeral, which is why it is brought for the festival offering instead of meat. This is to evoke the
idea of mourning over the loss of the Temple. The reason that the egg is a symbol of mourning is that it is a round food, which symbolizes the circle of life.