Passover

 

Edible 10 Plagues

 

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I was talking to a friend about a some fun new Passover seder ideas and we started to talk about an idea for edible makot or plagues.  What better way to liven things up and have some fun with the kids then to make the ten plagues into edible sweets.  I haven’t quite figured them all out, so I am going to share my list and hope you will chime in, in the comments with your ideas.

Blood – Red Jello


 

Recipes For A Moroccan Seder

 

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Passover is my gastronomic week.


 

Passover Menus For Every Taste

 

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From traditional to original we have Passover menu ideas for you.

bubby's chicken soup

2 Creative Traditional Passover Seder Menus


 

Passover Seder Plate Infographic

 

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Source: http://www.sukkahworld.com/Passover-Seder-Guide.asp


 

Passover Seder Salad Recipes

 

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Cooking for Passover is a challenge. Even before the cooking, actually. First there’s the cleaning and getting ready for the holiday. Then the shopping. Then the cooking.

We all know the rules. We can’t use this or that ingredient. None of our favorite breads or pasta or beans and such. Spices and other ingredients difficult to find Kosher-for-Passover. So, when added to the usual kashruth restrictions, minding all of these extra considerations for 8 days can feel daunting.


 

Unexpected Passover Potato Recipes

 

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Potatoes are an inevitable part of Pesach. You’ll be happy they are when you whip up these fresh and flavorful dishes. These recipes use minimal ingredients so that everyone, no matter what their Pesach customs are, can enjoy them. You can use either the non-Gebrokts potato dough and the Gebrokts version, with either the pesto or the orange sauce.

Gnocchi – Non-Gebrokts
Gnocchi, pronounced “nyo-key”, are thick soft Italian dumplings, most commonly made with potatoes. Gnocchi is usually served as an appetizer, but works as a side or main dish as well. Classic accompaniments of gnocchi include pesto, tomato-based sauces, and melted butter with cheese.


 

Passover Table Style

 

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Fit for Royalty

There is no greater sense of satisfaction than that felt at the start of the Pesach Seder. Inside, the house and all its contents are positively gleaming. And outside the first hints of Spring are emerging. Celebrate the Jewish people’s deliverance from slavery to royalty with a palette of white, shimmering gold, and accents of black and green.


 

The Passover Cream Cheese Butterfly Effect

 

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You’ve all heard about the butterfly effect — the idea that one small event or change can have a large effect somewhere else.  In classic theory, a butterfly flapping its wings can create a hurricane or tsunami halfway around the world.  You don’t go into Passover expecting to lose weight.  It’s a holiday and we are surrounded by delicious foods and wine all week long.  Your best hope is damage control.  And to be honest, after all the work cooking, cleaning and koshering a little indulgence is well deserved and need not induce any (more) Jewish guilt.

However, it’s the little decisions we make along the way that will tip the scales, one way or another.  During Passover, I love matzo and cream cheese, especially the fluffy white stuff from Temp Tee.  It’s comfort food.  It’s not going on a cookbook cover, but it doesn’t have to go on my thighs either.


 

Rolled Recipes for Passover

 

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At every holiday meal, there are the “wow” dishes that steal the show and showcase your efforts and talents as the cook. This beautiful dishes offer that perfect pizzazz, using the same minimal ingredients many of us are accustomed to cooking with on Pesach.

mashed ptoato beef roll ups

Mashed Potato Beef Roll Ups


 

Passover Holiday Memories *Giveaway*

 

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Memories can be quite powerful, food memories all the more so. When I use a spice my grandfather often used, or smell a cake like one my grandmother used to bake, I’m there in an instant, right in their kitchen. When Pesach comes, I close my eyes and I can see my grandfather eating matzah with a schmear of whipped cream cheese, a hot mug of sweet creamy coffee beside him.

That is Passover to me:  exactly that vision, that aroma, that taste.


 

Spring Salad Recipes For Passover

 

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In this month’s issue of Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller we celebrate Spring with salad.  As all the green starts to come back on the trees so to shouldn’t we bring it back on our plates.  We have lots of fantastic salads on this site actually over 600, but for the purposes of this post we will share a few that are kosher for Passover.  It is interesting to learn how many recipes have mustard in them, you can adapt many of them to work for Passover, but below are 5 salads that celebrate Spring and Passover.

shaved-asparagus-salad

Shaved Asparagus Salad with Pecorino


 

Charoset Recipes

 

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Charoset Recipes for you to try, tell us which one you make and share your own special recipe with us by submitting it here.

Everyone has a favorite and it is actually the most versatile food on the Seder plate and no matter how you make it there is no denying it goes well on a piece of matzah.  It is fun to try a few recipes, so take a look and find something different.


 

Passover In Israel – Chol Hamoed Activities

 

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Raise your hand if the announcement, “Mommy, I’m bored!” makes you cringe. Yeah, we’re waving our hands, too. That’s why we prepare fun lists of things to do on Chol Hamoed for guests at our Pesach hotels in Israel. Here we share some of them with you:

rosh hanikra israel travel


 

Saying Goodbye to Passover

 

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Passover is almost over.  Just two more days of Yom Tov and we will be back to our full kitchen and pantry — or at least an empty pantry ready to be filled with fresh chametz.  Don’t let your lessons learned from this Passover go to waste.  Whether you will host Seder night again next year or don’t want to think about hosting for another five years, making some notes now will help you later.

I have a confession.  I am not the most organized person in the world.  I am not even the most organized person in my family.  So I am writing this action plan to help me at least as much as help you.  I remember a few years ago when I was in Florida with family for Pesach, I visited my friend Maxine who always had the best leftovers.  They were usually better than whatever I had fresh the night before in my house (no offense to my father’s very good food).  Maxine also happens to be my cooking inspiration and she showed me her Passover binder.  Organized by year and Seder night, filled with menus and recipes and lots and lots of notes, Maxine is compiling a Passover guide for the perplexed.  Every year she writes down her guest list, her menus and her recipes and then comes back to it after the first days are over to rate which recipes were winners and which were best to pass over for next year.  Some recipes would be better if only they had some added “fill in the blank” and she even writes which families didn’t get along so well so she would know to invite them to different nights next year.  At the end of Passover, Maxine would list all her pots, pans, dishes, and serving utensils that she would want to buy for next year. Maxine would also write down how many boxes of matzo they went through, what spices they used and should buy again, etc.


 

Cheesey Matzah Dishes

 

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Just because it’s Pesach does not mean that we cannot have lasagna or pizza – it just means we have to make them differently. Using matzah instead of noodles or pizza dough is a genius idea – I have tasted some Matzah Lasagnas and Pizzas that are out of this world. How do you use matzah to replicate chametz dishes?

Enjoy these recipes: