Passover

 

Passover Prep – Clean Out the Car!

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Some people leave cleaning the car till the last minute. However, I prefer to have this done way ahead of time, so that I can do my Passover shopping without worrying that there is any chametz left in my trunk that will *somehow* wend its way into my chametz-free groceries that I just spent the second mortgage on!

Now you could do it the easy way and just take the car to the local car wash and have them vacuum it inside and wash and wax it. Or, if you want to make sure that it is done properly you can do it yourself. (Or supervise the children doing it.)


 

Jamie’s Greatest Passover Hits

 

Contributed by:

 

9 comments | Leave Comment

 

I can’t believe it.

Really I am in total denial.  Although I did tell my 2 year old — who doesn’t listen much anyway — not to run around the house with a slice of bread in his hand.


 

Passover Prep – Let’s Get Started!

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Purim is over, so now we are allowed to mention the other P word – Passover, Pesach, whatever you call it, is less than four weeks away. No need to panic though – take it slow and steady. We will bring you advice and tips and tricks to get you through this preparation period.

When I start my cleaning – and let’s be honest, most of us use Pesach Cleaning as an excuse for spring cleaning too – I start with the closets….. I have the kids go through their closets and drawers (us parents do the same) for clothes they no longer wear, things they no longer use. We make piles – clothing still in good shape to be passed to the younger child, clothing still in good shape to be given away, clothing in bad shape to be cut into rags and used for cleaning.


 

5 Out of The Box Ways To Use Potatoes

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

In the Pesach issue of Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller, Chavi Sperber shares a recipe for Gnocchi and for Shlishkes that can be eaten on Passover.  These are such inventive ways to use potatoes, I can’t wait to try the gnocchi.  She also inspired me to scour our site for more inventive ways to use potatoes this year.  Here are some new ideas I hope you will enjoy.

Sweet Potatoes with Raisins and Poblano Chile Rajas


 

Pesach Recipes that Were Winners

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

I usually tell the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth, and this time I did not disappoint. I stayed true to my promise and 99% of what I made for the 8-day kitchen yuntif known as Passover were not actually Pesach recipes. Of course they were K for P, but they didn’t require any major Passoverish ingredient tweaks. These recipes were developed with Pesach in mind and they were featured in the Pesach issue of my new magazine, Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller. But you can bet they’ll be staples in my year round repertoire ‘cuz they were super easy and got the most oohs and ahhs. Ok, real gourmet chefs don’t keep a tally of how many people flipped over this or that dish, but I really need to know. The winners on my menu get to come back and try for eternal stardom. This year, they are… drum roll, please…

Salmon Croquettes with Tropical Fruit Salsa
You can make this even easier by skipping the fresh salmon and using good quality canned salmon.


 

Our Perfect Pesach Primer

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Pesach is just around the corner – no matter how far in advance (or how last minute) we start the planning and preparation, we are always ready on time. Whether it’s a steady jog or a sprint to the finish line – we all get there.  If making seder for the first time or even the tenth time, there is still so much to cross off the to-do list – but we are here to help.

Below are links to our pesach posts, designed to make this holiday so much easier on you – wouldn’t it be nice to ease into Pesach without panic? Bookmark this page for next year and the year after – and free yourself from Pesach stress.


 

Happy Pesach!!!

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Chag kasher v’sameach – Have a happy and kosher holiday!

Pesach is the mother of all “Kitchen Yuntifs,” but stay cool and stress-nisht –we’ve got you covered with recipes, our Perfect Passover Primer, your Passover kitchen essentials, a Seder checklist and so much more! Follow our lead, and this year every dish you serve will be truly delicious, not just “pretty good for Pesach stuff.”


 

Why We Eat Whole Wheat Matzo for Passover

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

On all other nights I eat whole wheat bread, but on Pesach I eat whole wheat matzo.  Here’s my story…

My family switched to whole wheat bread a long time ago. I don’t really remember white bread in our house. That’s not to say I don’t enjoy a nice baguette or focaccia when I am at a café or restaurant, but for everyday sandwiches I always choose whole wheat. Why should Passover be any different?


 

Passover Rescue Plan

 

Contributed by:

 

3 comments | Leave Comment

 

I was really starting to fret as I was planning my menus a mere 4 weeks before the Seders, when I realized that I have a secret weapon for the holiday. My favorite ingredient Extra Virgin Olive Oil is kosher for Passover. I may have to give up my pastas, rices and spices, but I still have my extra virgin olive oil.

All extra virgin olive oils are kosher for Passover and year round, even with out kosher supervision. How awesome is that? We may give up our breads and cakes for eight days, but we will emerge from the holiday having feasted on foods made with delicious and healthy extra virgin olive oil. You cannot say that about Kosher for Passover oil which tends to be harsh and bitter and not healthy like extra virgin olive oil. How much cooking time and how many ingredients do you need to cover up the taste of bad oil?


 

The Last Suppers

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Hi Jamie,
I am a harried mom of 3 and find cooking healthy meals in the last few days before Pesach a real challenge. It’s no big deal to eat out once or twice – but the challenge is feeding everyone well while bringing minimal chometz into the house. What kind of suppers do you advise?
Thanks, Jenny in Boston

Jenny,
I am struggling with this too. For me it’s even harder because I “turn over” my kitchen to Pesachdig early on (to get a jump on the cooking) and it feels like Pesach here for 15 days, not 8.


 

Conversations at Levana’s Passover Table

 

Contributed by:

 

3 comments | Leave Comment

 

What is your favorite part of Pesach?

Well, when all is said and done, who could resist a spic and span house, full of gorgeous flowers, wonderful food and interesting people? Typically, many of our Seder guests are sort of “blind dates”, people who are sent by friends or by our schul, who have no idea how to make their own seder but would love to be in a good traditional home. It’s always great to see that people who you would think are  far removed from everything just love the closeness and togetherness. Many of them come back to us regularly.


 

Kosher Wine from Israel for Passover

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

This year, I propose a slight variation on the now familiar refrain that closes each Passover Seder. Before you pour one of the four cups of wine at your Seder meal, stand up and proudly declare: “Next wine from Jerusalem!” I guarantee your guests will not be disappointed.

Two thousand years before grapevines were planted in the venerable wine regions of France and Italy, wine was being produced in the land of Israel. Visiting one of the 250 wineries scattered throughout the country is a lesson in tradition meeting technology. Winemaking in Israel is both art and science, with plenty of help from nature. Boasting dry, hot summers, a short wet winter, occasional frost and cold Negev nights, Israel has the potential to become one of the premier wine growing destinations in the world.


 

Plan for Pesach

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

As we celebrate Passover, we are immersed in many time-honored customs. Special holiday traditions are reserved just for this time of year, such as the seder plate, the four glasses of wine, the many different foods, and the reading from the hagaddah. The four questions echo the beautiful sound of Pesach around the table while bringing family, friends and often strangers to a spiritually closer place.

The serene vision of a family table really makes for a beautiful picture. However, behind the scenes and before everyone sits down to the seder, reality produces a different picture altogether. To the shopper and the homemaker, I have one thing to say to you: You know what I’m talking about! The chaos, the cost, and the craziness in the kitchen associated with Passover can be overwhelming.


 

Meringue Magic for Passover

 

Contributed by:

 

3 comments | Leave Comment

 

There are certain wonderful dishes that I reserve for individual holidays, only to be served once a year.  You know, the special dishes that the whole family looks forward to throughout the year, and enjoying them during their distinctive, respective holidays makes them taste even better.  For my family, these include my famous key lime cheesecake on Shavuot, herb roasted turkey and marshmallow-topped sweet potato casserole on Thanksgiving, and meringues on Passover.  Meringues, the baked beaten-egg-white-and-sugar confection, are light and versatile and make the perfect dessert for Passover:  they require only a few, readily-found ingredients, they do not use matza meal which aids in their lightness and renders them non-gebrokts, and they can be flavored in a variety of ways so that they don’t get boring throughout the week-long holiday.

A beaten egg white can foam to eight times its original volume, which is key to making successful meringues.  When combined with sugar both for sweetness and structure, this egg white mixture creates the foundation not only for meringues, but also for such varied desserts as pavlovas, soufflés and angel food cakes.


 

Free Yourself With 2 Perfect Passover Menus

 

Contributed by:

 

2 comments | Leave Comment

 

On Passover, Jewish families all over the word gather together for a Seder.  Although our customs and traditions may vary across time zones and continents, we share our love of food and family.  Many people won’t serve roasted meat or poultry at their Seder, to avoid the appearance that they are replacing the paschal lamb, which was roasted over an open fire.  Some serve an egg at the beginning of the meal to symbolize life and Spring.  Karpas is usually represented by any number of leafy greens, but depending on your particular geography or family history can even be a potato or onion.

Here are a couple inspired menu ideas for Passover that just may start a new food tradition for your family.