Holidays

 

Watch Parsley Crusted Salmon Over Spanish Eggplant

 

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My cousin’s wedding in Tel Aviv featured the BEST simcha food I have ever enjoyed. It was simple, no fuss, pure deliciousness. The main course featured a choice between 1) melt-in-your-mouth short ribs, over pillowy sweet potato mash, topped with a caramelized onion quarter 2) pargiot stuffed with cinnamon infused ground beef, over a bed of dried fruit and pine nut couscous, finished with tahini and cilantro oil and 3) parsley crusted salmon filets, with tomato chickpea sauce. Most everyone sampled all three options. The evening was a display of simple ingredients cooked simply to perfection. I have since come home and recreated 2 of the 3 dishes the first of which I am sharing with you here today.


 

Kosher Pasture Raised Slow Cooked Chicken ...

 

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Have you ever tried cooking your chicken low and slow? It is a common method of cooking the best brisket, but not as well known for chicken.  There are a few ways to do this, our recipe takes advantage of garlic and lemon and some chicken broth to really bring out all the flavor.  Our chicken cooked for a few minutes at 400 degrees, but then the oven temp is reduced to 250 and the chicken cooks for another 1 hour and 45 minutes until it reaches the perfect golden color you see in the picture.   The meat is moist and delicious and the skin comes out perfectly crispy.


 

Cocktail Inspired Mishloach Manot

 

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Sending Mishloach Manot to friends and family is an obligation on Purim, but coming up with new ideas for your Mishloach Manot each year can be difficult. We all want to be creative and ‘wow’ our friends and family, but there are so many great ideas out there and narrowing it down to just one can be hard.  On Purim, there is an obligation to drink alcohol and cocktail inspired Mishloach Manot is a creative way to connect the obligation of drinking alcohol with Mishloach Manot. These three Purim inspired cocktails can easily be turned into Mishloach Manot using the packing instructions below and adding the cocktail ingredients.

Shushan Bullet


 

RSVP #WinnDixieKosher Passover Twitter Party

 

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You’re invited to join our #WinnDixieKosher Twitter chat!

Hosted by @JoyofKosher and sponsored by @WinnDixie.


 

Kosher Wine For Purim

 

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The Jewish holiday of Purim begins this year on Wednesday evening at sundown on March 4, 2015, and continues through Thursday night, March 5th.  The customs of Purim include “feasting and merrymaking,” in addition to “sending gifts to one another and presents to the poor”.  At Joy of Kosher the weeks leading up to Purim and through Passover include a lot of wine tasting.  It’s a tough job, but someone has to do it!


 

Celebrate Purim With A Vegetarian Seudah

 

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When you’re away from home, eating kosher can be difficult. You might be able to find a suitable restaurant nearby, but maybe not. For many of the people I know, it’s easier to eat vegetarian meals in those circumstances, so there’s never an issue about kosher meat or mixing meat and dairy.

That’s precisely what Queen Esther chose to do when she lived at King Ahasuerus’s palace — at least according to most historians. And so it has become tradition to celebrate Purim with a vegetarian seudah.


 

A Unique Israeli Menu For Purim

 

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These recipes let you imagine you are walking in the streets of Israel, tasting the flavors, smelling the aromas and enjoying the colors of one of the most interesting and provocative places on earth — Israel.

The dishes resemble the character of the country and the people with sweet and spicy flavors.


 

Themed Purim Seudah Menu Ideas *Giveaway*

 

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Adar is the month of increasing in simcha, happiness, and Purim, the main event of the month, brings that happiness to an all time high.  The Purim Seudah, holiday meal, is a highlight for many because the mitzvah to eat and drink in abundance brings the holiday induced happiness to new highs.  Whether you’re having a large or small crowd, the menus below have plenty of options to suit all crowds.


 

Cookbook Spotlight: Iranian Cuisine

 

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Iranian Cuisine is a unique and beautiful cookbook with recipes written in both English and Persian. Author Vida Leveim was born in Teheran and Persian culture and cuisine is close to her heart. The recipes are very authentic with ingredients like rosewater, cardamom and saffron in many of the dishes. It is a great cookbook to use to experiment with a new culinary tradition especially during Purim-time when you can impress your guests with a delicious Persian Seudah!

 


 

VIDEO How To: Hamantaschen

 

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As the JOK Taster I’ve been cooking up a lot of yummy’ness lately – but this project, well it’s one that I think you’re really gonna enjoy. We’ve made a really fun and quick video to boost your hamantaschen inspiration. If you’ve been having a hard time getting into the baking mood take a minute and watch the video, really it’ll only take you a minute, ok 90 seconds to be exact :) but truly, its worth it. And if you’re already uber excited about spending some quality time in the kitchen for Purim this video will at least bring a smile to your face.


 

How To Decorate A Party Sweets Table *Giveaway*

 

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Every party or Purim Seudah needs a dessert table. The best way to decorate for your party is to invest in the sweets. Now you can create a designer worthy display with these simple tips and tricks.


 

Queen Esther Could Have Been Plant Based, Right?

 

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Who is to say whether or not the banquet Queen Esther planned for the King didn’t include some plant-based dishes? There is talk about her vegetarian stance in the palace and just maybe her switch to eating more fruits, vegetables, tubers, legumes, and whole grains impacted how she felt in her body and in the world.

Eating plant-based food might have


 

Expert Tips On Making Hamantashen

 

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Making hamatashen is a fun annual tradition! Whether it’s picking the fillings, deciding on if it will be savory or sweet or even figuring out what kind of drizzle is best, hamatashen are a big part of getting together and celebrating Purim. The only issue is that hamantashen can be very tricky to make. Sometimes the filling oozes out a bit too much or the dough won’t form or the hamantashen open up completely when baking and don’t look at all like Haman’s hat (or ears).  We asked around the kosher cooking world to find out what hamatashen experts do to make the perfect batch. Here are a few tips that will help you with your baking this year:

1. Alex Idov a.k.a The Kosherologist explains that it is very important to keep the hamenstashen dough refrigerated. Alex takes out a little at a time, so the dough will be easier to roll out and work with.


 

5 Unexpected Hamantaschen Flavors

 

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Raspberry, poppy seed and chocolate all make for great fillings for those addicting little hamantaschen we get to enjoy each Purim, only thing is those are the only flavors we seem to receive.  I’ve seen some pretty exciting flavors of hamantaschen popping up on instagram pages of kosher bloggers and thought I would join in on the out-of-the-box hamantaschen party.  Below are 5 fun and unexpected hamantaschen flavors.

 


 

Mishloach Manot in a Jar

 

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Mason jars make an incredible gift basket for a variety of edible goodies. You can buy them in bulk (www.amazon.com or your local home goods store) for a mishloach manot treat everyone will remember. You can fill mason jars with anything you can dream up, from  soup to pasta sauce to sweets. Make it extra special by dressing up the jar with ribbon and a fun homemade gift tag.

Here are 10 great ideas for mishloach manot in a jar: