Holidays

 

Happy Thanksgivukkah

 

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Enjoy this once in a lifetime event!! Have fun with your family and eat lots of Thanksgivukkah treats.   The Joy of Kosher team sends you best wishes for a Happy Hanukkah and a Happy Thanksgiving wherever you are.

In case you missed any of our Thanksgivukkah recipes and need some last minute ideas, here are our holiday favorites from this year and year’s past.


 

Choosing The Right Types of Oil

 

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Chanukah may be the holiday of olive oil, but take a trip down your grocery aisle, and you’ll see as many different oils as there are colours of Chanukah candles. What is the difference between all of them and how is one to choose?

There are two main categories of fats; saturated fat and unsaturated fat.


 

Hanukkah Desserts

 

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We all love more dessert recipes and our friends in Montreal really know how to do them right.  We showcased the Montreal Hebrew Academy Cookbook, And Then There Was Cake and shared a few recipes last month.  Now, we get to sample a few more special for Hanukkah.


 

A Magical Hanukkah with Zucchini Latkes

 

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We are approaching Hanukkah which is known to be the holiday of miracles. Have you ever thought that cooking and baking is a sort of a miracle?

Every time you take raw ingredients and turn them into a delicious food that make all your senses so happy and content, you create magic!


 

A Syrian Thanksgivukkah Table

 

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We have shared a ton of Thanksgivukkah recipes, table decor ideas and fun gifts and treats.  We couldn’t resist sharing just one more.  Our friend Marlene runs TheJewishHostess.com and is always showcasing amazing tables-capes.  I really wish I could hire to set my table.  This year she decided to share a Thanksgivukkah table and here is a little preview for you.


 

The Shabbat After Thanksgivukkah

 

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This Shabbat we celebrate the third night of Hanukkah and it is also the day after the American holiday of Thanksgiving.  In this week’s parsha, Pharaoh dreams of seven years of plenty, followed by seven years of hunger.  After (at least) seven courses of Thanksgiving bounty, there is  undoubtedly an abundance of leftovers in our refrigerator this week. So we remake the plenty from the night before for a completely original  Shabbat Hanukkah menu that will feed your hungry family and guests.

Sweet Potato Soup with Sweet Potato Chips

Sweet Potato Soup with Sweet Potato Chips


 

RSVP For The #HanukkahChat Twitter and Pinning...

 

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It is almost Hanukkah and that means potatoes!!!  No one can go 8 days without at least one night of classic potato latkes.  To help us get ready for one of our favorite holidays, our friends at the Idaho Potato Commission are sponsoring a #HanukkahChat Twitter party.  See you there…

You’re invited to join our Hanukkah Twitter chat!
Hosted by @JoyofKosher and sponsored by the Idaho Potato Commission.


 

Pumpkin Hanukkah Recipes

 

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I love Pumpkin! It is one of the most versatile ingredients in my pantry and is a staple in my home. I use pumpkin in many recipes including: soups, risotto, breads, stews, ravioli filling, pie, and more.

One of the few canned foods I use is canned pumpkin puree. Canned pumpkin puree is a nutrient dense food. It is high in vitamins and antioxidants. To achieve the creaminess of canned pumpkin puree it would take hours and many pounds of pumpkin to result in several cups of puree. So now you know the secrets of this restaurant chef.


 

Gluten and Dairy Free Corn Pudding

 

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Golden sweet corn seems iconic at Thanksgiving, a symbol of the harvest. Corn side dishes are a pleasant foil to other more hearty, starchy fare on the Thanksgiving table.

Thanksgiving is all about traditions — traditions of family, traditions of gratitude and traditions of food.


 

8 Nights of Idaho Potato Latkes

 

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The classic potato latke, fried to a crispy golden brown and emerging from the pan still sizzling, is a family favorite during Hanukkah and year round.  Although the standard ingredients are simple enough, I have seen versions with no added flour, sautéed onions, thick, fluffy, grated by hand, shredded or even mashed.  What makes a really great latke is a really great potato, which is why your search should start and end in Idaho.


 

A Thanksgiving Kishke

 

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There’s a romantic relationship we seem to have with food, even the simplest food. Kishke, the simple stuffed gut is an Eastern European dish that I assume came from the poverty stricken communities in Eastern Europe.

When it comes to tying traditions together, like Thanksgiving and Chanukah, we turn to that romance and come up with recipes and a menu that combines the best of both worlds and a Thanksgiving Kishke is simply delicious. I’d never suggest skipping an actual stuffing at the Thanksgiving table, but if you’re making Friday night dinner the next day, this might be a good way to go. It’s oh-so-simple and you can either bake it in the oven or slow cook it in a soup or stew.


 

Chocolate Gelt For Grown Ups *Giveaway*

 

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Chocolate Gelt is all grown up and dressed up and it has plenty of places to go.

Veruca Chocolates is now making their specialty, hand crafted Hanukkah gelt with CRC kosher certification.  Veruca Chocolates was started by Heather Johnston, a pediatrician who got frustrated with the medical system and was looking to add some sweetness to her life.  She wandered into a chocolate making class and fell in love with the craft of the chocolatier.  Heather began creating high quality artisanal chocolates that seduce the eye as well as the palate.


 

Stuffing Latkes and Link Up

 

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In some circles (very small circles) I am known as the Stuffing Queen.  It’s not the kind of moniker you get etched into a gold necklace or printed on a tee, but from early September to late November every year, it makes me pretty popular.  When I first began hosting family for holidays, I served a wild mushroom stuffing on Rosh Hashanah and Thanksgiving that is now become an annual family tradition. 

On the days leading up to the holiday, I would buy a really nice loaf of bread (none of that pre-sliced stuff) and I would cut into medium sized cubes that I would leave out on the countertop for a day or two to go stale.  These nice big chunks of bread you can only get by cutting it yourself, so take out your battle axe or bread knife and start whacking.  After you think you have finished cooking the stuffing, either in the bird or separately in a pan, place the stuffing in the oven uncovered for about 15 minutes before serving to get the top layer nice and crispy.


 

My New Favorite Turkey and Stuffing Recipes

 

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I will now share with you one of my absolutely NEW favorite recipes – Sour Mash Whiskey-Glazed Whole Roasted Turkey.  I love this recipe and picture so much that I wanted it to be the cover of my new cookbook JOY of KOSHER: Fast, Fresh Family Recipes (William Morrow/HarperCollins 2013).  (Please buy your copy and gift copies, now!  And if you already did – THANK YOU!)   I was out voted only because it said “Thanksgiving” and was not “universal” enough.  I get that – but still wanted it.

There is a story behind this bird that didn’t make the book – it was cut for space – but I am happy to have all the space in the world to share it here.


 

Edible Holiday Gift Ideas

 

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I love presents! I love giving presents. I love figuring out the perfect present. I love seeing the smile on peoples face when they receive the present. Perhaps that is why I make giftware for a living!

It is truly better to give than to receive. And so whenever I am invited to be someone’s guest, I feel it is appropriate to show up with gift in hand. Living in a large, hospitable community I have ample opportunities to exercise my gift giving passion. But frequency comes with a price. And although I specialize in giftware, I am like the shoemaker whose children go shoeless. I rarely feel comfortable just giving my own creations.  So what is an appreciative guest to do?