Holidays

 

Celebrate Israel with Traditional Israeli Food

 

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There are many ways to celebrate Israel here in the US on Yom Haatzmaut, Israel’s independence day.  Most of the time it involves eating our favorite Israeli foods.  In Israel families pack large picnics and go out to BBQ and there is no reason we can’t do the same here.  Israeli food like Hummus and Zaatar has become increasingly popular among all people in the US over the past couple of years and it has become such a part of most of our homes that I rarely sit at a Shabbat table without being served hummus and often matbucha.  My favorite part is starting the meal with lots of little salads and spreads with some fresh pita.  Then you can grill up some chicken or kabobs or fry some falafel and your meal is complete.  Here is the menu I am thinking about this year, feel free to make your own spreads or take a little help from the store.

israeli style hummus

Israeli Style Hummus


 

4 Mother’s Day Brunch Menus

 

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This year the adage April Showers Bring May Flowers has proven to be quite true, and as May approaches so does Mother’s Day.  Brunch is a very special way to remind the special women in our lives that care.  Preparing brunch is a major task in and of itself, add to that the many delicious recipes out there, choosing your menu can at times be overwhelming.  Below are 4 menus to try this Mother’s Day.

 


 

A Trio of Passover Picnic Menus

 

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The interim days of Passover, chol ha’moed, are a great time to take trips and enjoy time with family and friends.  This year Shabbat falls in the midst of the interim days, still leaving three days to take chol ha’moed trips.  It may be hard to find kosher for Passover food while traveling, so consider packing a picnic basket inspired by the recipes below.

 


 

15 Passover Recipes With Honey

 

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Honey is my secret ingredient during Passover. It can be used in a variety of recipes – from entrees, to sides, to dessert – it is just so versatile. It provides balance to any dish complementing and enhancing a variety of foods and flavors, On Passover, we have to contend with a number of limitations and restrictions to our familiar recipes, but honey is easy to find and even easier to cook with. I love to cook with honey because it has a velvety texture and mouth feel that is completely unique. Honey is also a natural humectant which helps to lock in moisture and adds a rich golden color to both sweet and savory dishes.

Honey is all natural and the label should only list one ingredient – honey. Honey that is 100% pure is kosher all year long. On Passover, it is recommended to find honey with a reliable kosher for Passover certification to guarantee that it is actually 100% pure honey with no other ingredients or sweeteners. I also recommend that you buy honey in bulk, so you can enjoy so many fabulous and versatile recipes year-round. A miracle of nature, honey doesn’t spoil and can be stored indefinitely, so stock up!


 

Passover Cocktails

 

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If you haven’t noticed I have been really getting into cocktails lately, to the point that I am not ashamed to admit I have one practically every night.  You see the key to everything is moderation and if you stick to just 1 a night you can take the edge off and possibly decrease your risk of heart disease and stroke.  Plus I like my drinks with citrus, typically a whole lime or half a lemon goes into my drink and with it a little shot of vitamin C.  Now that I have rationalized my drinking for you I want to share an amazing infographic I found for Passover cocktails.

These cocktails were developed in honor of the four glasses of wine we drink during the Passover seder, Naomi Levy, assistant bar manager at Eastern Standard, created four original (and tasty!) cocktails inspired by different parts of the seder.  This fabulous guide shows you how to make regular simple syrup as well as special for Passover Manischewitz Concord Grape Syrup.  Now I know what to do with the bottle after I make charoset.  Just take note of the brands, they list which ones are kosher for Passover, amazing that we can get Gin, Tequila, and really good Vodka, but most of the brands listed in the actual recipes are not acceptable for Passover.


 

Watch Me On The Today Show

 

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Making Light and Fluffy Matzo Balls and Garlic and Honey Brisket for Passover with Kathie Lee and Hoda on the TODAY Show. If you missed it, watch the clip here:

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy


 

Quick Passover Breakfasts

 

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After all the preparation for the Seders you know you are set for dinner with leftovers, at least until they run out or you get tired of eating them.  But what about breakfast?  How do you manage to feed the family in the morning when you are in a rush, tired of eating matzo brie (although can one get tired of that delicious little pancake?), and your family doesn’t like commercial cereals that resemble their favorite everyday cereal but has a mouth feel of Styrofoam (my opinion)?

Here are some alternatives for breakfast that can start your day, and stomachs, on a happy note!


 

25 Passover Dessert Recipes

 

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In my mind, no meal is complete without dessert.  I love having something sweet as a way to mark the end of a meal.  Passover is a great time to take a break from your usual desserts, or it challenge you to find new ways to enjoy your favorite treats.  Below are 25 gebrokts and non-gebrokts recipes for Passover.

 


 

Toasted Almond Milk and Au Creme Passover Dessert

 

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In my continual quest for food worth every bite, I love to explore the entire culinary world and create unified Seders reminiscent of a specific time and place in Jewish history. This year my theme will be the French countryside. Not exactly associated with Pesach, I know, but Rashi was there, so for me, it works. I wanted to make a no-bake, pareve pot au crème that is simple and has the texture of the creamiest pudding you’ve ever had.

Pot au crème, or pot of cream, is a traditional French dessert that has been found as early as Medieval times. It is a custard cooked in a water bath, or bain marie. The cups used have a history all their own–they were often made of the finest porcelain with either one or two handles and small fitted cover on top. I inherited two sets of Passover dishes but alas, none include a dainty pot au creme set, so I make due with some sturdy tea cups.


 

Dress It Up: Matzah Pizza Recipes *Giveaway*

 

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I am not a big fan of kosher for Passover foods.  Meaning, I like to make things that I actually make and eat over the course of the year, recipes that are inherently kosher for Passover.

But there are two exceptions, matzah brei and matzah pizza.  Two foods I so enjoy and always wonder why I don’t bring them into the year-round rotation.


 

The Great Shabbat Menu

 

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This week is Shabbat Hagadol (translated as the great Shabbat), it is the Shabbat that precedes Passover and is connected to the miracles that happened in Egypt.  Since this Shabbat falls so close to Passover, many homes are already kashered and we are tasked to create a fabulous meal without any bread or any matzo.  Hopefully you will be able to get some Challah to enjoy and then try this menu that can be made before, during and after Passover and still be considered great.

Salad with Pastrami Croutons

Spring Salad with Pastrami Croutons and Balsamic Reduction


 

Four Israeli Wines for Your Passover Seder

 

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The number four comes up many times throughout the Passover Seder.  We read aloud the four questions, describe the four children and enjoy four glasses of wine.  The significance of the number four relates to the promises G-d made to Moses: “I will take you out of the forced labor in Egypt, and free you from their slavery; I will liberate you and I will take you to be My own nation.” (Exodus 6:6-8).

This year we are hosting family and friends for the first Seder and I wanted to highlight four wonderful Israeli wines we will be celebrating with this year.  L’chaim!


 

The Kosher Butcher Wife’s Favorite Passover...

 

 

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As a proud South African, this Pesach, my Seder theme is ‘Out of Egypt into Africa’. This year all the beautiful inherited Pesach crockery will be used after the Seder. Last week our Rabbi gave a shiur on the importance of keeping the children entertained during the Seder. After all isn’t it their night too? How right he is. I can still remember, as a child, falling asleep under the dining room table only to be woken up by the lebberdikke thumping on the table when ‘Echad Mi Yodeiyah’ was sung. So this year it’s an African themed Seder where table decor will be combinations of white linen, leopard print embossed hessian overlays, white miners lanterns filled with African daisies, Wee Willie Winkie candle holders, tin plates and cups, wooden serving spoons, wooden matzah boxes and a very special carved wooden seder plate.


 

Cookbook Spotlight: 4 Bloggers Dish eCookbook

 

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How does it happen that four kosher food bloggers from different states come together to write the first ever eBook of kosher Passover recipes?

“Food bloggers constantly read other blogs and love to see what creative types are cooking up and writing about.  Kosher food bloggers network even more deeply because of our niche,” explained Liz Rueven of Kosher Like Me.


 

101 Passover Recipes

 

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Last year one of my friends posted a picture of her Passover preparations with the comment: “slaves in mitzrayim (Egypt), now slaves in the kitchen”.  Passover has some of the most difficult holiday preparations, but the hard work comes with great reward.  Every year we remind ourselves of the foundation of our people, the themes of oppression and liberation.  All of the hard work does take its toll but when everything is ready and we’re finally at the seder, we can truly begin to understand the feeling of liberation.

That being said, the key to Passover preparations is organization and planning. With so many meals to organize it makes it that much easier to have all of your go-to recipes in one place, which is why here at Joy of Kosher we wanted to present a thorough list of of some of our best recipes. Below are 101 Passover recipes, if you would like more ideas please check out the rest of our Passover ideas here.