Holidays

 

15 Healthy Passover Chicken Recipes

 

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Passover would probably be at the top of the list of healthiest Jewish holidays.  Sometimes, though, because of the many restricted ingredients, we may find ourselves adding a little extra oil and salt than is necessary.  These 15 kosher for Passover chicken recipes are easy, healthy, and full flavor.

 


 

Shortcut Matbucha Shakshuka Video *Giveaway*

 

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I’m kind of a connoisseur when it comes to Shakshuka.  The fact that I have ordered it in most every restaurant that serves it should certainly qualify me as an expert of some sort, dontchya think?

I have had Spinach and Cream Shakshuka at Café Rimon in Mamilla, an open air mall outside the Old City of Jerusalem.  I have had Leek and Eggplant Shakshuka at Gavna an outdoor cafe overlooking the Judean Hills in the Gush and I have had the traditional tomato and pepper Shakshuka at café chains across the country and at Ikea’s kosher cafeteria in Rishon L’Ziyon.  I have eaten Shakshuka both with and without both  Feta and Bulgarian cheeses, both with runny and firm yolks and both spicy hot and not spicy enough.  I love it.  In truth, I just adore it still, this after 18 months of making it my mission to try every Shakshuka in Israel.


 

A Passover Tablescape

 

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Before I can sit down to plan my seder night menu (or maybe we should leave that one to Jamie), I like to design my tablesetting for the evening well in advance of Pesach, as let’s face it, who has time later. Make it fun and easy so the entire family will enjoy. All you need is some cardstock, scissors, corks for the placecards, a good craft store and dollar store (shekel shop for those of us living in Israel), a computer and a little imagination.


 

Fresh, Fast and Fancy Passover Sides

 

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I had a blast tasting and testing these 7 sweet and savory Seder sides for Passover. All ingredients are easily accessible in both the U.S. and Israel, and all recipes are non-gebrochts. Watch these simple Seder side dishes become staples at your table year-round!

Salad with Pastrami Croutons

Spring Salad with Pastrami Croutons and Balsamic Reduction


 

In the JOK Kitchen with Let My Children Cook! ...

 

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Tamar Ansh, otherwise known as the challah queen (at least that is how I know her cause of her book, Taste of Challah), just came out with the perfect Passover coobook for you and your kids.  Let My Children Cook!, would be a fun book for anyone and can really help get your kids get involved in the kitchen his year.  She covers all the basics, like matzah balls and charoset as well as lots of new serving ideas and recipes for the whole family to enjoy.  She even throws in a few clever crafts.  I spoke with Tamar and learned a bit more about her.

1. What inspired you to write this cookbook for kids?


 

Passover Placemats Craft

 

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Supplies:

  • One sturdy, brightly colored piece of thicker construction paper, size
  • 8 X 11 (A4), per kid
  • One good photo of each kid who is making a placemat
  • Stickers for decorating the edges
  • Magic markers in various colors
  • Stencil for writing the letters of the name, optional

Instructions


 

Shabbat Menu – A Clean New Year

 

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This week in parsha Tazria we continue reading about the laws purity, but it also happens to be Shabbat Hachodesh.  The Shabbat before the first of Nissan, which is considered the first month of the Jewish calendar.  At the same time Spring is in the air and we are cleaning our homes and preparing for the holiday of Passover.  Let’s start the new year off with clean and homes and clean bodies.  This week’s menu features clean healthy foods that have no processed ingredients.

Indian Inspired Salmon Cakes


 

15 Salad Recipes for Passover

 

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This is how it works isn’t it: as soon as Purim is over we all start planning (stressing over) our menus for Passover.  After indulging in hamantashen and other treats during Purim the last thing I want to do is think about food.  I can make an exception for salads because they are my go-to for passover and are currently a main feature of my post-purim cleanse!

Pesach (Passover) is probably my favorite holiday to cook for; despite all of the restrictions it a great learning experience because it forces you to transform basic ingredients into meals worthy of the holiday.  These 15 salads are kosher for pesach and are a nice way to balance some of the heavier seder meals, or to serve at lunch with leftover fish or meat from the night before.


 

Healthy Recipe Ideas You Will Love –...

 

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It’s become a healthy habit I can’t break — starting a meal with lots of Mediterranean spreads. With a crowd of hungry guests, a table set with an assortment of appetizing spreads and salads, along with the requisite items for dipping keeps the hungry wolves at bay while I’m busy in the kitchen finalizing the rest of the meal.

During Passover, when every meal starts with matzo, you really need something extra to make it special. Cream cheese and butter are nice, but they are dairy, lack nutrients and add extra fat and calories that we definitely don’t need on the holidays. That’s why the Mediterranean diet is so popular with nutritionists and dietitians everywhere. Eggplants, peppers and tomatoes are in abundance and the spreads are tasty, low-fat and healthy.


 

Baked Horseradish Gefilte Fish

 

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This month we are highlighting horseradish for our Kosher Connection Link Up to get us all in the mood to start preparing for Passover. I’ve made many recipes with horseradish over the last year so be sure to read my article about the healthy horseradish.  I became a huge fan of how horseradish adds a nice kick to so many dishes and the health benefits is a bonus.

When I think about horseradish for Passover I immediately thought about gefilte fish. To be honest, I don’t even usually put horseradish on top my gefilte fish, but the idea of putting it inside seemed too good to not try.


 

Shabbat Menu – Purity and The Red Heiffer

 

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From the rejuvenating waters of the mikvah, to the memory of Miriam’s triumphant dancing after the splitting of the In this week’s Parsha Shmini we read of the purifying power of water and it is the first time we read in specific detail the kosher dietary laws concerning what animals are permissible and prohibited, the criteria for kosher fish and birds and a list of kosher insects (yuck!). This week is also called Shabbat Parah, the Shabbat of the red heifer, which describes the ways in which we purified ourselves to being to prepare for Passover. These days we are purifying our homes by purging them of chametz and so we will eat a chametz filled menu featuring the Red Heiffer.

vegetable barley soup

Vegetable Barley Soup


 

Scent of a Moscow Mule

 

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A couple of months ago a cocktail-loving friend of mine mentioned the Moscow Mule. The name didn’t sound the least bit appealing to me, but I have to admit I was intrigued when he explained how he was going to a bar that serves the drink the old-fashioned way — out of a copper mug. Just like when you discover a new word and then hear it everywhere, over the past few weeks I’ve been followed by the Moscow Mule – in signs, news articles and bar menus so I had to try it myself and share it with you.

The Moscow Mule is made from vodka, ginger beer and lime. It was created in the 1940′s to help sell more vodka in the U.S. It was served in the iconic copper mug as a marketing gimmick. People would see others get a cool looking different drink and ask for the same thing. Today, with the resurgence in popularity of this classic cocktail bars are discovering customers walking away with the copper mug as a souvenir, says the Wall Street Journal. People love the drink and want to recreate it at home with the right vessel, but there is a way to do this without committing a felony .


 

Uses For Leftover Hamantashen Filling

 

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You have been diligently preparing for Purim making many Hamantashen with many different fillings. Your Shalach Manos baskets need to be filled with assorted treats and your Hamantashen are anticipated additions in your baskets.

Most religious institutions, when preparing for Purim festivities, enlist cadres of cooks to assemble scores of dozens of Hamantashen for their holiday carnivals. Along with the traditional prune (lekvar) and poppy seed (mohn) fillings, apricot, almond, chocolate, strawberry and other fruit flavors have become favorites.  When preparing hundreds or even thousands of Hamantashen at a time, bakers can easily use many different flavors and have no leftovers.


 

10 Add On Gift Ideas

 

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One of the mitzvahs of Purim is to give mishloach manot comprised of at least two different types of food.  In addition to a food basket, consider giving loved ones an extra little gift to enjoy along with their hamantashen.  Below are gift ideas for the ten “personalities” you might encounter among your friends and acquaintances.

 


 

Sweet and Spicy Sambusak For Purim

 

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Curry leaves, fenugreek, and multi-colored mustard seeds aren’t part of every day Ashkenazi fare. Integral to Indian foods, they are all part of the vast sweep of Jewish cuisine that includes distinct Indian- Jewish communities.

Kolkata (Calcutta), Cochin and Mumbai (Bombay) were home to the largest Jewish communities for centuries, and yet were relatively unknown to the West. There were smaller Jewish communities dotted throughout the Indian subcontinent. They developed foodways deeply influenced by their neighbors, from spices to techniques.