Holidays

 

Planning Your Thanksgiving Menu

 

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Most other food and recipe websites are doing countdowns to Thanksgiving, we save ours for Passover (you can sign up for Passover countdown here).  For everyone else in the world, Thanksgiving, celebrated with a multi-course extravagant meal, is a big to do and requires lots of planning.  For most of us, Thanksgiving is a piece of cake (or maybe pie).  After three day yom tov holidays all throughout October and the cleaning and prepping it takes to celebrate 2 Passover seders, we (I) revel in a day where we can actually cook food the day of serving.


 

50 Thanksgiving Recipes

 

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Thanksgiving always seems to sneak up and send me running to the kitchen for a marathon of cooking.  Despite all of the holiday themed blog posts and downright delectable pins on pinterest, I never seem to be prepared.  When I started becoming religious Thanksgiving was one of those days where I could say to my family “See, I’m still like you”!  I treat the day as an excuse to overeat (did I really just admit that?!) and a chance to spend extra time with the family.  Below are 50 Thanksgiving recipes to help streamline your menu planning.

 


 

A Shabbat Project Breakfast Idea

 

 

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Looking for inspiration for a Shabbos Breakfast? – look no further than these Israeli Breakfast ideas.

Rushed off our feet during the week sometimes makes it impossible to sit down as a family and eat a healthy breakfast together. Let’s really get into the spice and spirit of the promised land, leaving the macon and eggs behind, to enjoy the land of milk and honey in the form of an Israeli breakfast.


 

Caviar For Shabbat

 

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This article is dedicated to my father, who with out fail, reminds me every three day yom tov to do eruv tavshilin.  Eruv Tavshilin refers to the prepared food that is set aside with a prayer before a yom tov, that allows us to cook and prepare foods on a yom tov for Shabbat when Shabbat is the following day.  This is most often necessary when two days of holiday lead into Shabbat as we have been enjoying this year.  Get all the details of Ervu Tavshilin here and don’t worry if you have forgotten or didn’t know about it before, there are many that allow you to rely on the eruv of the Rabbi in the community who will have everyone in mind.

In my family as I am sure in many it is customary to use a hard boiled egg and challah or matzah for the Eruv.  It is easy to eat the bread at any meal, but no one in my family really likes to sit down to a hard boiled egg, that is how I started to serve Caviar on Shabbat.


 

Fresh Seasonal Food For The New Year

 

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With the holidays quickly approaching, we find ourselves yet again in the kitchen preparing daily feasts for our families and friends. Whether we are cooking traditional foods or new recipes, we sometimes get lost in the idea that the more complicated the recipe, the tastier and more impressive it is. In my own cooking, I find that it’s usually the simpler recipes using fresh and in season produce are the most delicious and healthier to boot.  Let’s put the healthy back into the new year and cook fresh, seasonal foods!

Here is a favorite recipe of mine, Moroccan Mint Beet Salad. Pairs beautifully with any fish appetizer from gefilte to sea bass and everything in between.


 

A Simchat Torah Mexican Menu

 

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On Simchas Torah and Shemini Atzeres, it’s time to push your culinary daring to the limits. Consider the fact that we’ve just come through Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, and Sukkos, not to mention a Shabbos or two. Everyone at your table is thinking, “If I see one more potato kugel…” So have fun with the menu and try my simple recipes for Butternut Squash and Black Bean Stuffed Poblanos (a mild chili pepper) and Mexican Brisket, a fab twist on traditional recipes.


 

5 Menus for Shemini Atzeres, Simchas Torah, &...

 

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Ok, I admit it, I am guilty of calling every holiday “my favorite holdiay”.  Another confession, I don’t feel all that guilty– I really love everything about the holidays (minus the limits on showering, but let’s not discuss that).  Sukkos is this incredibly festive, yet humbling holiday.   Shemini Atzeres and Simchas Torah fall right at the end of Sukkos, after Hoshana Rabbah, and are literally, truly, just straight up days of rejoicing.  In gashmius, materialistic, terms: bring on the food!  These 5 menus will leave you full, feeling festive (you may also need a nap) and will motivate you to dance all night (and work off all those calories…sort of kidding!) by Simchas Torah.

 


 

Fresh Fig, Carrot, Fennel and Kale Salad

 

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Fresh Fig, Carrot, Fennel and Kale Salad Posted 10/08/2014 by Chef Tami Weiser
An all purpose fall and winter dish is always welcome in my home kitchen. This salad makes use of so many of the treasures of the fall and it’s great for the High Holidays, Sukkot and even Chanukah. If you are serving vegans, substitute 2 teaspoons grade B maple syrup for the honey- it tastes different, but it’s equally delicious and will pair with wonderfully with turkey.

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Join Us For The Shabbos Project

 

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Last year The Shabbos Project took South Africa by storm with a weekend dedicated to getting as many people as they could to keep Shabbat from sundown to stars out.  The weekend kicked off with a mass challah baking lead by our dear friend and regular contributor, The Kosher Butcher’s Wife, Sharon Lurie.

The Great Challah Bake


 

The Best Stuffed Peppers With Variations

 

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Present a tray of multi colored stuffed peppers for an easy holiday dish that will surely elicit oohs and aahs. I am going to give you a few variations on this recipe that’s ready in 40 minutes: from start to serve.

Colors: Don’t stress on the colors – it’s just for presentation. Of course a green bell pepper is not as sweet as yellow, orange and red but after that consideration buy what’s on sale, available or pleasing to your eye.


 

Kosher Wine for Sukkot

 

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This year we enjoy a mid-October Sukkot.  The stars are coming out a little earlier, there is a chill in the air, leaves are starting to change color and the bees and mosquitoes are (hopefully) gone for the season.  Sukkot is also my most favorite holiday, there is nothing quite like al fresco dining and drinking.

Living in an apartment in the city our family relies on the kindness of friends and family during Sukkot, so we’re frequently visiting others with a bottle of wine in hand and thankfulness in our hearts.  Here are some of the wines we’ll be sharing this week.


 

A Menu That Is Easily Brought Outside For Sukkot

 

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When it comes to Succot, I think it’s really important to choose a menu that is a simple as possible. The tradition and fun of eating in a Succah is best highlighted by fill in your table with easily transported dishes and foods that taste best at room temperature. By removing the stress of serving hot foods and finding adequate space to place it, you can enjoy your family and friends and focus on what the holidays are really about!

The recipes below can be made ahead of time and served at room temperature- what more can you ask for?


 

30 Stuffed Foods for Sukkot

 

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In terms of the sheer number of holidays (not talking about amount of work…nissan has that one covered!) Tishrei is simply stuffed!  This year’s three-day-long chagim require a lot of advanced cooking and with that comes a lot of eating.  While we all look forward to enjoying certain traditional foods at Rosh Hashanah and (pre/post) Yom Kippur, Sukkos leaves a lot of room for culinary creativity.  A great way to exercise the foodie in all of us is by finding different ways to pack as many (read: pleasant) flavors into your dishes, the most literal manner of doing this is by cooking meats and vegetables that are literally quite literally stuffed with vegetables or dairy, respectively.  Here are 30 stuffed foods to try this sukkos.

 


 

Yom Kippur Pre Fast Meal

 

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Just before Yom Kippur, it’s important to eat foods that make fasting easier – in fact it’s a mitzvah. First, you want to minimize salt and spices that may induce thirst. But that doesn’t mean the pre-Yom Kippur feast must be bland or boring. This menu is simple and satisfying and can mostly be made in advance.


 

A Modern Break The Fast For Yom Kippur

 

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Lately, it seems everyone is really into either nostalgia or modern.  Either we want to make our traditional Jewish foods, like gefilte fish and kugel or we want to change it up and go modern.   Both have their merits, for me nostalgia often brings to mind the break fast I had growing up which I shared with you a few years ago, see that menu here.  I know Jamie has gone more modern lately looking for healthier foods and she shared some of her favorites last year, in her Yom Kippur Break The Fast Recipes post here.   This year I offer a simple modern menu for those looking for something a little different, but still true to our roots.

Pastrami Gravlax