Healthy & Kosher

 

Grilling Indoors – Grilled Kosher Recipe...

 

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I love to BBQ. I grew up in Florida where we took year-round grilling for granted. Right now I don’t have my own grill. I live in an apartment and they are not allowed. My family and I suffer through BBQ withdrawal symptoms during the winter months and have to beg for invites come summertime. When we decided to make this month’s Kosher Recipe Link Up about grilling, I realized that many of you out there, like me, don’t have a grill either, so I will just have to give you something that has the taste of BBQ without the actual grill, the best part is, it is an all year round recipe no matter where you live.


 

3 Healthy Summer Smoothie Recipes

 

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When my son stopped eating fruit, I caught an awful case of mom-guilt. Where had I gone wrong? Fruit had always been a lunchbox staple and a go-to afternoon snack. But suddenly I was competing with Three Musketeers and Kit Kat. A few days later, I passed by a juice bar and it hit me like an apple. I needed to be smooth, rather than smart.  So I started freezing my fruit and blending smoothies for my family. Whether you are looking for breakfast on the go, a boost for your workout or fighting a cold, smoothies are the way to go. It takes 3 minutes to prepare and less to clean up. The flavor combinations are as wild as your imagination, so let’s drink to your health!


 

Wild Rice to the Rescue

 

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Although called rice, wild rice isn’t rice at all. The black strands are actually a seed of a type of marsh grass. It is a hearty grain that takes about an hour to cook and has a slightly chewy texture and a nutty flavor. Often used as a mix in with other rice or grains, it is surprisingly good on its own.

Wild rice is a healthful alternative to regular rice and other grains. 1 cup of cooked wild rice has 165 calories, 6.5 g protein, 3 g fiber and good amounts of iron and copper. It is high in B vitamins as well as potassium and phosphorous — it is even considered a complete protein. It actually wins out over brown rice which in 1 cup has 216 calories, the same 3 grams of fiber and only 4 grams of protein.


 

4 Low Carb Pizzas With Pizzazz

 

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I was inspired when I made Portobello Mushroom Pizzas for my kids and they gobbled it right up.  Then I saw Melinda post a recipe for a Cauliflower Crust Pizza and I thought there must be something here.  Sauce and cheese are good on just about anything.  What else can we use as a pizza crust that will be lower in calories and offer more nutrients?

I love veggie topped pizza.  Back when I worked for the Center for Science in the Public Interest on their Nutrition Action Healthletter, we did a study on the calories and fat in restaurant pizza.  We found that vegetables not only offer added nutrition, but usually displace some of the cheese, offering a lower calorie slice.  So when ordering out or making it in I always go heavy on the veggies.  My kids didn’t really know what plain cheese pizza was until they started getting slices at birthday parties – and then they complained about not having any mushrooms, broccoli or spinach on top!  My kids don’t really do salad, so I love that they get everything they need in one slice.  Sometimes we even get broccoli, spinach and mushroom pizza for a real treat.


 

90 Calorie Frozen Fudge Bars **Kosher Recipe...

 

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Today we introduce the first Kosher recipe linkup.  We have gathered together the best kosher food bloggers on the web to share some of their favorite frozen dessert recipes.   Every month we will choose another theme, share a recipe and a linkup to all our blogger friends who are also participating. We know you will love it!

This morning Jamie shared her recipe for a Strawberry Soda Float, so refreshing and easy to make!  I wanted to post my new favorite popsicle, Homemade Frozen Fudge Bars.


 

Snacking in the Kitchen the Healthy Way

 

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I told you last week that I am trying to pay more attention to what I eat these days, not just to health, but to calories for weight loss.  I’ve been very happy with the new app, My Fitness Pal.  One of the things I notice most (when I’m paying attention) is I am a picker.  I pick the food off my kids plates when they say they are done.  My son hates his crusts, I love them.  I pick a spoonful of rice or two to make sure it is ready, not sure why a few grains can’t do.  I pick a few forks full of pasta just to be sure it is al dente.   I rack up the calories before even sitting down to dinner.  Sometimes I am full by the time I sit down and I still eat more.

It’s time to pick without packing it on.


 

The Jew and the Lotus Root

 

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I have long been intrigued by the lotus root.  This odd looking root vegetable, when sliced, shows off a beautiful pattern that is a gorgeous garnish.  I’ve seen it in soups and stir fry dishes and wanted to try it at home.  I recently read about Baked Lotus Root Chips.  I am a huge fan of all sorts of vegetables chips, check out my article from last year when I made carrot, zucchini, kale and butternut squash into tasty snackable treats.  Now it’s time to try the lotus root.

When sliced and baked or fried, it is not only beautiful, but one of the tastiest crunchy snacks I have had in a long time — even without any seasoning.


 

Tips for Weight Loss – My Fitness App

 

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I am a Registered Dietitian.  I went to school to learn all about health and nutrition and how food can make us sick and how food can help us feel better.  My job as a Dietitian has been to help others learn how to make healthy choices.   We advocate integrating whole grains and lots of fruits and vegetables into a healthy diet, in moderation and with variety.  However, even the best of us can lose their way sometimes.  Even though I know what to do, it doesn’t mean I always do it.

When people ask me why I chose Dietetics, there were a lot of influences, but one was the fact that I was a chubby kid.  My diet crazed parents started me at the tender age of 3 on my first diet.  It’s too late to call child services, so I guess I turned out okay.  I did learn to watch what I eat early on.  And I never stopped.


 

Summer Food Safety 101

 

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With summer coming, I thought it was the right time to remind everyone of a few rules of thumb when it comes to food safety.  We do a lot of outdoor cooking and eating and practicing good food safety habits will help keep your guests safe and reduce the risk of foodborne illness.  People with compromised immune systems, like pregnant women, newborns and older adults should avoid certain foods altogether, but no one can avoid the results of spoiled or contaminated food.  Food bacteria, like salmonella and E. coli, don’t cause food to smell bad or change in color.   There is no way to tell if a food is contaminated, so it is important to follow these safety tips:

1.       Refrigerate foods until ready to eat.  Perishable food should never be away from refrigeration for more than two hours, if outside in 90F or higher, the food should be thrown out after an hour.  Food borne bacteria grows fastest when food is left at temperatures between 40 and 140.  So leaving it on a hot plate while at shul – okay, leaving it out on the counter –not okay.


 

5 Foods for a Healthy Picnic

 

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This time of year is the best time to bring our food outside.  Hopefully, if the weather cooperates we should have some sunshine days that are not too hot and not too cold.  So, let’s pack up our food and take the family outside.  Picnics are great for Shabbat afternoons if you have a nice park nearby.  They are also a great part of a Sunday activity.  Go sightseeing to a mansion where they often have picnic tables or find a state park.  Bring a ball, a deck of cards and a frisbee for a fun and relaxing day as a family, a couple or even on your own.

The trick to making this a really great day is packing colorful, healthful foods that will be the envy of all who pass by.  Don’t just pick up potato chips and dip or bagels, take a moment to prepare a few dishes you won’t regret.  Almost any dish can be portable if packed well in a sealed container, but some sit better than others.  It is best not to bring salads that have to be dressed fresh instead find salads that do better after a couple of hours. Don’t worry about a perfect menu either, pick a few different kinds of foods so that there will be something for everyone.


 

Gluten and Dairy Free Recipes

 

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One of my favorite things about the Jewish tradition is all of the foods we eat to celebrate each holiday. Having food allergies, however, has made those traditional foods complicated–I’ve been gluten-free for almost three years, and until very recently I had been dairy-free for over ten years.

My food allergies have actually been a blessing in disguise because they forced me to think outside the box, looking across a variety of cultures to discover new and delicious flavors. My Shabbat and holiday tables are frequented by reimagined traditional Jewish foods: Gluten Free Kugels and Cholent to name a few.


 

Health Risks of Barbecue Grilling

 

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Now that the weather is warming up we’re all excited to get out there and have some fun in the sun.  For me, it’s not summer without barbecue!  There is nothing I love more than fresh, hot off the grill meat, fish, vegetables, fruit and even garlic bread and focaccia.  In many ways, grilling can be a healthy way to cook your food, maybe even the healthiest since you typically don’t use added fat or oil, but there are some health risks you should be aware of before you light up.

The grilling process can generate chemicals that can be potentially hazardous to your health.  The main culprit is charring.  The flavorful, crispy black crust that forms on grilled food causes the chemical composition of the food to change.  Cooking meat at a high temperatures on a grill (even broiling or frying) can cause the amino acids, sugars and creatine to convert to Heterocyclic Amines (HCSAs) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) when fat drips onto hot coals, creating smoke that can be absorbed by the food.  These compounds have been associated with increased risk of some cancers.


 

Jamie Geller’s Lightened Remakes

 

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Jamie shares her recipe for a Low Fat Lemon Cheesecake along with other lightened up recipes for this issue of the magazine.  Here are some more classics remade into lighter versions by Jamie Geller.

Light Pasta Alfredo


 

Ants on a Log For Grown-Ups

 

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I’ve never really thought much about celery and I’m guessing most people feel the same way.  I don’t love it and I don’t hate it.  It’s just celery.  It’s one of those vegetables you keep around to add flavor to soups and stews as part of the mis en place.  I used to buy a bag and it would last six months as I took out the few pieces I need here and there.  I never really liked to snack on it, unless you slather it in peanut butter and call it Ants on a Log, but that’s for kids, isn’t it?

Nutritionally, celery has a healthy supply of vitamins, is low in calories and high in fiber.  Last year, I was at one of Levana’s cooking demos where she made a salad with thinly sliced celery.  It opened my eyes to using celery in ways I had never done before.  I started to stock fresh celery again and add it to many salads, always thinly sliced. I introduced my kids to Ants on a Log one day, but instead of raisins we used dark chocolate chips, they loved it!


 

Wheat a Minute! Why Choose Whole Wheat Pasta?

 

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For years, dietitians have been encouraging a diet filled with whole grains.  After all, whole grains may lower the risk of diabetes, heart disease, cancer and obesity.  I know it’s easier said than done. French bread and focaccia are so delicious and nearly impossible to find whole wheat.  What’s a foodie to do? Although a diet rich in wheat flour is probably best, it’s just not realistic for most of us.  It’s important to choose your battles and when it comes to pasta, it’s a fight worth having.

Vegetable Mac and Cheese and Greens with Pesto Vinaigrette