Healthy & Kosher

 

Sun, Sand and Sandwiches

 

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Growing up in Florida, I took the beach for granted. I lived less than 20 minutes away from the Atlantic Ocean and when people asked if I was near a beach, I said no.  Like old men in shorts wearing knee-high dress socks and dinner that starts at four in the afternoon, people think and act differently in Florida. In Florida, if you don’t live close enough to walk to the beach, you only go when family or friends are in town to visit.
After living in New York and braving freezing cold winters, I finally learned to appreciate the beach.  I make sure to be especially nice to my friends with summer vacation homes and I strategically plan my visits to family in Florida around December.
Every parent knows going to the shore is no day at the beach. Planning a day at the ocean is harder than preparing a tax return.  When my kids were very small I would spend half the day making sure they don’t eat the sand and the other half cleaning the sand off of them.  Luckily, as my kids grow older, things get a little easier.  Listening to the sound of the crashing waves, smelling the coconut-infused suntan lotion in the air and watching my children defy the laws of gravity with their sand castles makes it all worth the effort.
I can live with the sandstorm that follows us home in the car for what seems like weeks.  I can even grimace through the inevitable sunburn in the shape of a handprint.  But I can’t tolerate being hungry! If you don’t keep kosher, you can always buy food at the beach. Mediocre pizza, cheese steaks and hot dogs abound.  As you might expect, the choices are unhealthy and expensive, but at least there are choices.
If you keep kosher, you need to be a little more creative and plan ahead. I once brought bagels (good idea), but I forgot to have them pre-sliced (bad idea) and spread (very bad idea).  By the time we were ready to sit down to eat, I couldn’t tell the sand from the sesame.
The editors of joyofkosher share their top 10 ideas for healthier, tastier, and cheaper ways to enjoy a day at the beach.

1)     When packing food for the beach, think food safety first. Stay away from anything with mayonnaise, eggs or milk – they don’t last long in the heat.


 

For Grads & Dads: Kosher Party Grub with a...

 

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With graduations galore and Father’s Day coming up on the 20th, June is full of parties. Time for some crowd-friendly comfort food.

It’s June and there will be parties! All kinds of parties. Graduation parties, pool parties, garden parties, summer dinners … not to mention Shabbat meals and Father’s Day celebrations. Parties equal hungry people, but summer comfort foods can also be the enemy of maintaining that perfect beach bod.  So, with a little help from my friends, here are 7  kosher party dishes that offer healthy  alternatives to conventional recipes and are sure to please the scads of guests running through your backyard. Serve any of these with a refreshing summer cocktail like EatingWell.com’s Island Limeade.


 

Spring into Good Shape: 5 Tips for Lighter Eating

 

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Which warm-weather foods should be added to your diet?

When it comes to the clock, we know that you spring forward. But when it comes to your bathroom scale, you probably would want to see those numbers falling backward! As we shed our heavy winter coats, the few pounds gained over winter might be something you’re ready to shed, too!


 

Healthy Kosher Eating: Why You Need to Bone Up on...

 

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Most people think their bones are like pieces of wood: a strong material that gives your body structure the same way that wood frames a house. But, did you know that your bones are living tissues and they continue to change throughout your life?


 

Osteoporosis: Does Mom Always Know Best?

 

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On Mother’s Day, here’s how mom can take care of everybody including her own.

Mother’s Day is one of my favorite ‘holidays.’ Okay, I know it’s not a real holiday, but I certainly take advantage of the efforts my husband and children make to create a delicious breakfast and a special day.


 

Kosher Ingredient of the Month: Spring Onions

 

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I have a love-hate relationship with spring. While I am always excited to shed layers of coats and hats – there is always disappointment with early spring produce. There is nothing to eat that really screams SPRING!

I call March, April and early May the “hungry” months. Just as we are getting outside and looking to lighten up our menus with bright springy flavors, Mother Nature is holding out on us. It is not until late May that flavors of the season start appearing in the markets. There is one exception: Spring Onions.


 

Earth Day: 5 Tasty Ways to Honor the Planet

 

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April 22, 2010 is Earth Day. The holiday, which began 40 years ago in the United States, is now observed by an estimated 200 million worldwide. Here are 5 simple, tasty ways to honor the planet.

For the past few years, the media has been touting the benefits of eating locally-grown or organic food. From television to newspapers, websites to magazines we learn that locally- and organically-grown food has better protein ratios and more vitamin C. Meat and dairy products from grass-fed animals have been shown to be lower in saturated fats and harmful cholesterol.  And food grown organically or purchased from a local farmer has a smaller impact on the overall environment.


 

Foods from the Earth on Earth Day

 

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Nutritious, Delicious and Kosher: Are organic foods worth it?

April 22nd is the 40th anniversary of Earth Day. Back in the 1970s, organized rallies took place protesting offenses to the environment including toxic dumps, factories that created pollution, harmful car emissions and pesticides, just to name a few.


 

Eating Locally is Easy When You Grow Your Own...

 

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Whether you’re planting window boxes or an outdoor kitchen garden now is the perfect time to get started on the summer growing season.

Eating locally is a hot topic in food circles these days. Restaurant chefs have long known that to serve the freshest ingredients, you need to choose items that are grown or raised nearby. Many chefs have entered into partnerships with local farmers to ensure steady supplies. But you don’t have to be a chef or a farmer to grow your own. In honor of Earth Day and the start of the spring growing season, I spoke with Heather, our “Green Gal” about kitchen gardens.


 

Top 12 Tips For Coping With Fussy Eaters

 

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WHAT’S THE FUSS?

Anyone with children will know that when it comes to eating, fuss is often high on the menu.


 

Top Ten Tips for School Lunches Your Kids Will...

 

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PlaceholderMany children aren’t keen on school lunches and are opting instead to take lunch from home. Preparing a packed lunch every day in the rush before school can become a real nightmare and, unfortunately, most of the foods manufactured especially for children’s lunchboxes are really unhealthy.

Children are all different but by and large what they want is a quick fix—a bag of chips and a chocolate cookie that can be wolfed down in minutes saving maximum time for the playground. It’s never going to be what parents want, good food that will sustain them until dinnertime.


 

QUICK & KOSHER: BACK TO SCHOOL

 

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Good Ol’ American Ketchup and the Top 10 Healthiest Kid Foods

Most of the elders in my family are from “the old country”– though from the half dozen languages we speak, you’d think it was several old countries. And we have a tendency to talk really loud, unlike polite Americans who seem to converse in whispers. In keeping with this European influence, our eating habits are also distinctly un-American—like making a meal out of a zillion cloves of fresh chopped garlic piled atop toasted bread and butter. (Don’t knock it: my grandfather, z”l—the Garlic King—lived to age 97 on that diet.)