Healthy & Kosher

 

Betting On Winter Greens

 

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Wen I was studying to become a dietitian and cramming for an exam, I followed the mantra “bet on green” whenever I was unsure of an answer on a test. Packed with dozens of vitamins and minerals, it was hard to go wrong then, and even now, I still bet on green. With the winter approaching, most of the colorful tomatoes, corn and squashes begin to disappear off the supermarket shelves, replaced by bright leafy winter greens. Winter greens are green-leafed vegetables, hardy enough to thrive in the colder winter weather. They include chard, collards, mustard greens, escarole, kale and beet greens, among many others. They are loaded with vitamins, minerals and phy- tonutrients, which may help prevent heart disease and cancer.


In 2009, The Center for Science in the Public Interest (a nationally recognized not-for-profit research organization where I used to work) ranked nearly 85 vegetables in order of highest to lowest nutrient content and found kale, spinach, collard greens, turnip greens, and Swiss chard in the top five.


 

Everything Is Better with Tahini

 

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When I was growing up, we stayed far away from tahini.  My dad has a sesame allergy and I didn’t really know what I was missing.  After all, tahini was still largely overlooked as a mainstream product in the U.S.  I remember once trying some packaged halva and I didn’t care to try that again.  I also remember having a can of tahini that blended the sesame paste with lemon and water already for you, and it tasted about as bad as it sounds describing it now.

It has only been the last several years that I have come to LOVE tahini (sorry Abba) and I expect more and more people will be jumping on the tasty tahini bandwagon soon.


 

Avocado Egg Salad

 

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As a Registered Dietitian, I always suggest that my clients eat whole foods, whenever possible. Not only are whole foods more nutritious and packed with more healthful vitamins and minerals than their processed counterparts, but they are also naturally delicious.

Eggs are am excellent example of a whole food and are good source of protein, rich in vitamin D, biotin and choline. Eggs are also inexpensive and widely available.


 

Making a Kosher Reuben Sandwich

 

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Over the summer I read somewhere that the Reuben sandwich was one of the top 5 favorite sandwiches in this country. While the sandwich is associated with the Jewish deli and Jewish food, it must have been created when Kosher style came around. The traditional sandwich is inherently not kosher given that it combines meat, corned beed, and cheese, Swiss. That being said many kosher delis will serve it without the cheese and others have dressed it up, like Citron and Rose in Philadelphia, who makes an open faced lamb Reuben sans cheese.


 

A Healthy Rosh Hashanah Menu *Giveaway*

 

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This year get all your kosher shopping done in one place. Winn-Dixie is committed to providing kosher foods and works to add more products every day.


 

Buckwheat Honey Time

 

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A few months ago I was invited by the National Honey Board to a honey tasting.  Do I have a sweet job or what?  I learned everything I ever wanted to know about honey and discovered my new found love for buckwheat honey.

Buckwheat honey was the last variety we tried.  It is a dark honey with a very intense, malty flavor. It is amazing how the source of the pollination, in this case, buckwheat, can impart such a difference in taste and texture.  After licking my spoon dry, I noticed that about half the other people didn’t finish their sample.  The person leading the demonstration said, “you either love it or hate it.”  (Clearly I was in the love side of the spectrum)


 

Healthy Recipes for the High Holidays *Giveaway*

 

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Summer is almost over, school is about to begin and the High Holidays are approaching.  I look forward to all our Jewish holidays, even the “dreaded” three-day Yom Tov.  It helps that I work for a Jewish company so I am not missing any work, but I especially appreciate the family time without work or digital distractions. Connecting to a day of rest is one of the healthiest things we can do for our bodies, but because we like to eat (a lot) on the Jewish holidays, we have to plan properly to stay healthy.

My goal at all Shabbat and holiday meals is to feature vegetables for two thirds of the menu (and my plate). Luckily, most of the simanim (symbolic foods) can help us out.  With carrots, leeks, cabbage, beets, and pumpkin among the foods that promise a year of health and wealth, there are some great choices at your local market.


 

3 Healthy New Breakfast Ideas

 

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My clients are always asking for breakfast items that they and their kids can both enjoy. Sugary cereals and breakfast bars aren’t the ideal way to start the day, which is where these recipes come into play. Some of them you can make in advance, and others are better fresh, for the days when you have a little more time. Serve them with a nice fruit smoothie, and you’re all set for the morning!  With  a little planning, you can make delicious, unique, and healthy breakfasts that both you and your kids will crave.


 

Back To School Beans

 

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Some people get the back to school blues.  You know, the feelings of worry and nervousness before the first day.  The stress of getting back into or starting a new morning routine to get everyone off to school and work on time.  I like to beat the blues with beans.

Beans are one of the best sources of vegan protein.  They are also a carbohydrate that is packed with fiber, vitamins, minerals and antioxidants your body and mind will benefit from.  Beans are satisfying and take longer to digest so they keep you full longer.  This way you won’t be distracted by hunger pains too early in the day.


 

Hidden Vegetables – What You Don’t...

 

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My husband Ed likes to tell the story about when he was a boy and ate dinner at his grandma’s house on Tuesdays. One time she gave him spaghetti – a favorite – and when he had almost finished he found a slice of meatloaf that had been hidden underneath the pile of pasta.

Ed hates meatloaf.


 

Eating Healthy With Red, White and Blue

 

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Fourth of July is a patriotic time to celebrate with family and friends. But it can also be a time to eat healthy, nutritious, red, white and blue food! This dish incorporates purple [blue] potatoes, red beets and white goat cheese. As a Registered Dietitian, I’m more than happy to serve up a healthy [and All-American!] dish this year. Purple potatoes are rich in the same antioxidants found in blueberries and pomegranate seeds. Red beets are rich in fiber, vitamins A, B and C, and folic acid [an especially important nutrient for mamas-to-be]. Goat cheese is a good source of protein and calcium, and offers a tangy and creamy bite. The cheese pairs nicely with the different textures of the potatoes and beets.

I always tell my clients to try and “eat the rainbow”, and this dish definitely fits the bill. And it doesn’t hurt that this recipe could not be simpler to put together!


 

A Guide To Ancient Grains

 

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You might notice a strange sensation the next time you are strolling down the aisle at your local supermarket.

A prehistoric flashback?
Caveman-like confusion?


 

It’s Time For Cauliflower To Take Center...

 

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Vegetables have long been the trusty side kick to steak, chicken and fish.  A sort of companion to the main meal, in the best meals, it can highlight the best of the main, but in many instances it is really nothing, but a forgotten afterthought.  Recently with the farm to table popularity and more interest in vegetarian and vegan foods, vegetables are finally playing a starring role on our plates.

Not just for vegetarians.  In many restaurants around the country, vegetables are assuming the part of the hero with or without meat.  Just because you are highlighting the vegetable doesn’t mean you can’t include a little meat flavoring to enhance it unless you are a vegetarian.  I love getting inspired around the web and I feel like every few months there is a new vegetable taking center stage.  Last month I shared a recipe for Shawarma Carrots which I happened to just serve again with beluga lentils and my kids couldn’t get enough (especially the one that hates carrots and loves meat and spice), I was amazed.


 

Cheesey Jalapeno Corn Muffins Made Easy

 

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How do you take ordinary corn muffins and turn them into something extraordinary with only one extra ingredient? Use a Jalapeno Cilantro cheese from Sincerely Brigitte.

I want to disclose that this post and recipe is part of a partnership with Sincerely Brigitte, a new gourmet flavored cheese company.  If you missed my introduction and your first two chances to win a cheese sampler pack don’t worry, go here and enter there will still be two more winners, cause we are giving one away every Thursday in May.


 

How To Cut a Pineapple – Step By Step...

 

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Ask Us:What is the best way to cut pineapple?

Answer