Magazine Articles

 

Comfort Food With No Compromises

 

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Create the ultimate comfort foods to satisfy all palates using Tofutti’s variety of dairy-free products.

kosher chicken parm

Kosher Chicken Parmesan


 

Healthy and Gourmet Popcorn Recipes

 

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Who was it that first discovered the magical potential hidden within every kernel of corn?

That healthy snack, light as air…  that burst of white, crunchy happiness?


 

DIY – Homemade Bubbly Cocktails

 

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This time of year sparkling wine and champagne are in high demand.   We love to toast with champagne and we love to mix it up too.   Light and fruity wine cocktails are the perfect complement to any celebration. When you have some bubbles, a bit of spice, and some succulent fruit, you can’t go wrong.

How to choose good wines to use in cocktails?


 

5 Minute Party Food

 
 

It’s party time!!  Even though Hanukkah is almost over, there is still lots of time to party.  With these cold Wintery nights ahead, it is more fun to invite everyone in rather than go out.  That doesn’t mean you want to spend hours preparing.  Enjoy these recipes for 5 Minute Party Food.

When feeding a crowd it is always great to serve mouthwatering food with distinctive flavors that leave people wowed and make the food and party a memorable experience; good food really has that power. There are many exciting new kosher products available for the ever-growing palate of the kosher consumer. Jack’s Gourmet provides high-quality kosher charcuterie that is authentic and provides the kosher cook with flavors and textures that weren’t always available.  In addition to great flavor, the products are versatile, contain NO fillers, are gluten free, and contain no MSG. As the items are ready to serve in a matter of minutes, they make for a versatile and epicurean ingredient that can be prepared in many ways.


 

Let’s Have a Chanukah Party

 

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Hosting a Chanukah party?

We have 3 gourmet menus suggested by premiere caterer, Esprit Caterers.  Get some ideas, try some of the recipes and use them for your party.


 

Shawarma: Israeli Fast Food

 

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The most popular fast foods of Israel are by far falafel and shawarma. Both are served in either pita or lafa and with a variety of salads and dips, resulting in the perfect bite of food. Traditionally, a pita is filled with falafel and/or shawarma, a shmear of hummus, some Israeli salad, and topped off with pickles, olives, charif, and fried eggplant. The tastes and textures are phenomenal and can become quite addicting.

In last year’s Hanukkah issue the Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller Magazine we created the ultimate Israeli fast food experience.  With recipes for all the Israeli fast food favorites, including salatim, pita, falafel and of course Shawarma.  To see the full story and get all the recipe order your subscription and past issue here, Subscribe. Today we are sharing here the recipe for Shawarma.


 

A Haute Market In Jerusalem: The Shuk

 

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Jerusalem’s Machane Yehuda Market is a literal feast for the senses. Visitors to this outdoor market, or shuk in local parlance, are greeted with the vibrant colors of fresh produce, the guttural sounds of vendors yelling competing prices to passersby, the wafting smells of whatever is in season, and the tastes of rich halva, warm borekas, comforting stews and sweet tropical fruits. If you are a food lover, then a trip to Israel is hardly complete without a stop here.


 

Israeli Salads – Not 1 Leafy Green To Check

 

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What makes a salad Israeli?

After all, Israel is the ultimate melting pot of Jewish cuisine. To go even further and peg these salads as Middle-Eastern is so vague since each region from Turkey to Yemen has such a unique flavor profile. In fact, the signature “Israeli” Potato Salad is almost exactly like my Romanian- Hungarian grandparents’ chicken salad – go figure. Look, I’m no culinary anthropologist but I have a simple, straightforward way of defining Israeli salads… roll that drum… salads that are commonly eaten in Israel.


 

Israeli Food: The Fusion Continues

 

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Israeli cuisine, reflective of the Mediterranean diet, is redolent with fresh produce, legumes, fish, herbs, spices, and olive oil. But it was not always so. The first Hebrew cookbook, How to Cook in Palestine by Erna Meyer (1936), recommended: “We housewives must make an attempt to free our kitchens from European customs, which are not appropriate to Palestine.” Meyer appealed to adopt zucchini, eggplants, okra, and olives and eventually people did (although not so much okra). Diced cucumber and tomatoes became ubiquitous ‘salat’ or ‘Israeli salad.’ From the dining halls of kibbutzim arose a new way of eating and thinking about food, inspired by biblical Israel and based on the modern Levant. Some European food traditions endured.  The German quark cheese emerged as the predominant Israeli processed dairy product, g’vina levana. In due course, immigrants from more than 70 countries contributed to Israel’s culinary diversity and continuing evolution.


 

In Season Persimmon Recipes

 

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Persimmons are tropical-tasting fruit that come in various shades and textures; the most common being the Fuyu persimmon (firm, round and light orange) and the Hachiya persimmon (soft texture, oval and dark orange). The firm, pale orange persimmons are the most versatile and can be eaten both raw and cooked. The deep orange varieties are extremely soft and are best used in soups, purees or jams. Fuyu persimmons ripen after they are picked, while Hachiya do not. Make sure not to eat unripe (firm) Hachiya persimmons as they can leave an uncomfortable, dry feeling in your mouth.

Persimmon tart

Persimmon Tart


 

Rethink Your Salad with These Creative Fall Salad...

 

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Salads refer to a whole category of dishes that include raw vegetables but can also include: cold, cooked vegetables, including grains and pasta; ones which add cold meat or seafood; sweet dishes made of cut-up fruit; and even warm dishes. Though the prototypical salad is light, a dinner salad can constitute a complete meal. These dishes are served dressed with vinaigrette.

Vinaigrettes are an emulsion of oils and vinegar sometimes flavored with herbs, spices and commonly used as a salad dressing or cold sauce. Salads are complex and vexing for most chefs who write menus. In America, the salad starts the meal and as a chef, I want my first impression to be a good one. In Europe, a salad ends the meal and the last impression should also be a good one. A salad can be exciting and palate stimulating. I urge all home cooks to rethink their salads. This can be a make-or break course and can become the course that everyone looks forward to.


 

Learn To Melt Chocolate For Parve Chocolate...

 

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What better way to end a meal than with decadent chocolate desserts?

Here is your source for all things chocolate:


 

Gastronomic Journal of Mendy Pellin

 

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An Italian Holiday Feast

 

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In last year’s Rosh Hashanah issue of Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller we shared three unique holiday menus.  Italian, Moroccan and Traditional.  Today we will share Alessandra’s Italian feast with you, but you don’t want to have to wait a year for the amazing recipes and menus we feature in our magazine, get your subscription here.

Click through to each recipe to find make ahead tips to make this menu easier to prepare.


 

Infused Honey

 

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One of my favorite experiences growing up in Seattle was driving to the Puyallup Fair every September. We admired the enormous prize-winning animals, rode the roller coasters, and walked through the booths of “As Seen on TV” products. What I looked forward to the most was the Snoqualmie Valley Honey, and every year we stocked up on a variety of flavors for Rosh Hashanah. My whole family and I stood at the honey booth, taste-testing each one, from Washington Wild Blackberry (my favorite) to Clover and Peppermint, while my mom loaded up on honey bears and honey sticks for us to enjoy year-round. Since I no longer live in Seattle and always miss going to the fair, I love to make my own infused honey to use for the holidays. Every drizzle is a trip down memory lane and there is nothing more gratifying than making your own artisan honey.

The directions are the same for any flavored honey you choose, and the options are endless!