Kosher Tips

 

5 Foods That Will Make Your House Smell Great

 

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I’m the kind of girl who loves nothing more than closing the windows and turning off the vents when I’m sauteing garlic and onions so that I can sit in its aroma and walk around with it all day smelling like fresh cooking. However, some people (read: my mom) can’t stand it, and want the house to smell of nature and baked goods. Since that opinion wins out, here’s a list of foods that will make your house smell great.


 

Deviled Egg Recipes To Change Up Your Seder

 

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The seder plate contains 6 symbolic foods: maror (bitter herb), charoset, chazeret (“lettuce”), karpas (vegetable), z’roa (shank bone), and beitzah (egg). The egg is
unique because to me, it is the most far removed from exact events that happened during the time of the exodus. The egg is on the plate to commemorate the festival
sacrifice that was brought to the Temple in Jerusalem, and roasted and eaten as part of the meal on Passover night. However, the symbolism of the egg is deeper than just
this.

An egg is the first food a mourner eats when he or she returns from a funeral, which is why it is brought for the festival offering instead of meat. This is to evoke the
idea of mourning over the loss of the Temple. The reason that the egg is a symbol of mourning is that it is a round food, which symbolizes the circle of life.


 

Using Raw Eggs Safely

 

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It’s THAT time of year again! I have been hearing that expression for well over two months before Purim!?!

What is it about Pesach that causes fear in the hearts of all the homemakers of Frum households? Cleaning our homes to ‘Chometz-free’ perfection is a Herculean task! We all do accomplish this feat by the time Bedikas Chometz rolls around! Hopefully, our families pitch in and jobs are assigned so everyone feels like they did their share in the mitzvah of preparing and helping our parents welcome Pesach.


 

7 Tips To Make the Fluffiest Matzah Balls

 

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If any of you had read my Common-App essay (the essay you use when applying to college), you would know that I have been cooking since I was in fifth grade. Among the first things I tried to create were matzah balls. Those heavenly bites of salty, schmaltzy, fluffy goodness were what I so looked forward to whenever my mom made chicken soup. However, we always used a boxed matzah ball mix. I never had any problem with this; I didn’t know any better! While Allon Beck refers to matzah balls from a mix as, “pasty, tasteless, mushy balls of evil,” I never had a problem with them. Perhaps my standards for Jewish food were too low, but gorging on leftover matzah balls from a mix is my most anticipated Passover activity. They’re salty, squishy, and carby, but in the perfect portion size to have either one or five, depending on my mood. They’re an ideal snack for me because as long as I don’t have too many, they’re not that high in fat or calories (although they have almost no nutritional benefit to them).

One problem I always had with my matzah balls was the consistency. Since everyone in my extended family always thought of me as “the cook” (and since I was the only kid who would go near the kitchen, they always felt the need to taste and applaud what I cooked), my family members would eat ANYTHING I made and throw an endless stream of compliments at me. I thought I was the perfect cook.


 

Zesting 101

 

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Many Pesach recipes call for the zest of citrus fruits. But if you’re a cooking newbie, you may not be familiar with this food preparation technique. Zest is the colorful, outermost rind of fruits like lemons and limes), and oranges). Aromatic and tangy, it is a popular addition to both savory and sweet dishes.  Zest also makes an elegant garnish.

Here is my guide to zesting:


 

Perfect Poached Eggs with Step by Step Photos and...

 

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One of my favorite ways to eat eggs is a perfect, single poached egg on soft whole grain or sourdough toast, sprinkled with salt. Simple yet elegant!  And if I’m feeling really decadent, I butter the toast. Delish!

I ordered exactly this the other day while catching up with friends over brunch… this sparked quite a controversy over how to poach eggs. The topic even in invoked out right panic in one of my girlfriends at the mere thought of attempting to poach an egg! So, I thought I’d show them and you, how I do it!


 

Slow Cookers For Every Day

 

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Who said weekday dinners had to be boring? The way to keep them fresh and fun just requires a little preparation. Stock your kitchen with staples like whole-wheat pasta, organic fish, poultry, meats, and organic fruits and vegetables (go frozen if you can’t buy fresh). Then, either cook double on the weekends when you have time, so you don’t have to worry about your meals during the week, or use your slow cooker.

Freeze the food properly in Tupperware freezer containers so your foods will not develop “freezer burn”.  My DVD recipe organizer has a video demonstration with Freezer Tricks that will teach you how to do it correctly.


 

How to Make the Perfect Bowl of Oatmeal

 

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This past Sunday night, I suffered a tremendous loss–the Patriots fell to the Giants in Super Bowl XLVI, losing their lead in the last quarter of the game. I’m currently still stuck in Indianapolis, and the one thing I want more than anything is my go-to comfort food: a ginormous bowl of oatmeal. Since I can’t make it myself until I get bacl, l’ll give you the instructions and tips you need to make the perfect 1-serving bowl of oatmeal from start to finish.

You need:


 

Cooking with Eggs Lesson One: Perfect Hard Cooked...

 

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A hard cooked egg has both a firm white and yolk. If boiled or cooked too long, the protein toughens or becomes rubbery and a greenish or purplish ring forms around the yolk. Refrigeration is necessary for hard cooked eggs if they are not going to be consumed within a few hours.

Ingredients


 

Cooking with Eggs – Eggs 411

 

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The incredible, edible egg! Do you recall that jingle? It’s been playing in my head for some time now as I’ve been contemplating what to share with you regarding how to prepare the perfect hard cooked egg. I love eggs. Eggs are the perfect whole food, nutritious, delicious and they have their own carrying case! Eggs have the perfect ratio of protein, fat and carbohydrates and you can enjoy them any time of day. Perhaps they are so popular for breakfast simply because their rich golden/orange yolk is another form of nature’s sunshine.

Always Start With Good Quality Ingredients


 

Slick Tips for Cooking with Oil this Chanukah

 

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Chanukah might be known as the Festival of Lights, but for cooks, it’s really all about the deep fried oily foods that become an indispensable part of our menu. I’ve noticed that during this time, I smell like a fast food joint for 8 days straight; you’d think that I had deep fried my clothes, my shoes, everything I touch.

So what better time is there to discuss the oils we use in cooking? It is important to become familiar with the different types of vegetable oils for best results in baking, frying, and serving with fresh foods. Vegetable oil may be made from a single ingredient or a blend of several. Most will be available as either refined (lighter in color and bland) or unrefined. Depending on the refining process, oils will have varying smoke points. Refined oils (especially peanut or safflower oil) are recommended for high-heat frying. Unrefined oils are best as dressings, as an ingredient in marinades, and for low-temperature sautéing. Some of these are a healthier choice and will be full-bodied.


 

Rotisserie Chicken

 

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Nothing brings out our primal instincts in cooking more than preparing food on an open spit. What was once a necessary cooking method requiring nothing more than meat, fire and a big stick has now become all the rage in the best markets and butcher shops.  Walk down any main street and you will see large rotisserie ovens turning and churning out freshly roasted chicken, juices dripping down the window pane and appetites growing with every step.  The good news is; these succulent birds can be easily prepared at home for a fraction of the cost.

To achieve rotisserie nirvana, you can, of course, invest in a countertop rotisserie.  The manufacturers of “slice them and dice them” fame make affordable and practical models for your home, as does Cuisanart other name brand kitchen appliance companies.  The results are good and the clean up is generally easy.  If the weather is not a factor, you can brave the elements and cook your bird on an outdoor spit, your gas grill most likely comes with an attachment and the bird can roast outside, lid down until juicy perfection.   Some indoor ovens come fitted with a rotisserie option, and all you need to do is follow the manufacturer’s instructions, keep a watchful eye and spin your bird to delicious results.


 

How To Choose and Cook a Roast

 

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Let’s first get our terminology straight, what exactly is a roast? Basically, a large portion of meat cut from any region of the animal is a roast.  From those large pieces, thinner cuts are made and those are steaks and from those steaks, strips and chunks are cut and those are best for stir-fry and stews. Roasts are cooked in the oven at higher temperatures for shorter periods of time.  That’s why they need to be cut from regions of the animal that start out tenderer. Forget about the fancy schmancy made up names that every butcher has concocted. What you need to consider is that

cuts from the chuck or shoulder region are going to be tougher than those cut from the rib. For a solid piece of meat from the chuck look for the Square or French roast, or one of my favorites the Silver Tip.  That cut is lean and solid (good traits in a mate) and should be roasted to rare. However, if you want to dazzle your dinner guests then move next door to the best (and most expensive) roast from the rib section. This is a ritzy neighborhood known for its juicy beefy cuts.  The seven ribs in this section are used to create the glorious standing rib roast. Cuts from the short end will have less bone and a meatier eye. You can also cut a boneless version, which becomes a rib-eye roast. It is leaner but also less flavorful because it is usually trimmed of its fat and is missing the hearty bones.


 

Tip #27 – What is a Good Alternative to...

 

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Try Panko (Japanese bread crumbs) or actual crushed cornflakes or rice krispies instead of breadcrumbs on chicken cutlets or fish sticks.


 

Tip #25 – What Do I Do if my Dough is Sticky...

 

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When rolling out and braiding Challah if the dough is too sticky use canola oil instead of flour. Lightly grease your fingers when rolling.