Kosher Tips

 

Freezer Tips For Your Collection

 

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With Yom Tov upon us, it’s important to review all the FREEZER TRICKS I share in my cookbook and at my Tupperware Freezer Class demonstrations.  I often give out a sheet like this at my demos, called ‘The Deep Freeze” with many freezer tips and tidbits. Bookmark and save these for future reference!

1- Always leave ¼” – ½” at the top of the container to allow for food expansion.
2- Never “burp” before freezing Tupperware freezer containers – seals will pop off quicker when food expands due to reduced air space.
3- Your freezer runs much more efficiently if packed full – (check previous month’s tips).
4- Save money by buying in bulk and flash freezing vegetables and meats – pull out only the number of pieces of amount that you need.
5- Add cornstarch to shredded cheese and then freeze – cheese will not freeze together.
6- Put coffee in freezer in Tupperware and it will not freeze solid and retains the natural oils in the bean which make for a better cup of coffee. One pound of coffee will brew 40 to 50 cups.
7- Use (Tupperware) Jelring for homemade ice cream cakes (layer whatever you please – try adding flavored liqueurs….!)
8- Use (Tupperware) Ice Tups for baby’s boo boos and teething; and don’t forget frozen pops for yourself!
9- More ice crystals form on cheaper brands of ice cream, therefore buy the best!
10- When you remove a Tupperware container from the freezer, wipe the inside of the seal before replacing the container – air temperature change will cause condensation that will drop back onto food causing ice crystals.
11- Always let food cool down before sealing and placing in freezer – because the steam will form condensation which will drop down onto your food and form ice crystals.
12- Make freezer jams and put into 12 oz. tumblers – no cooking or processing needed and tastes like fresh fruit.
13- Freeze juice, iced tea, milk in tumblers for minimum of 2 hours and then put in cooler or lunch bag – they will serve as your ice packs (no others needed-Perfect for Pesach/Succos trips!)
14- Put an onion in the freezer for several minutes before slicing “for no more tears!!”
15- Put a block of cheese in freezer for a half hour and it will not crumble when grating.
16- Cook soups, stews, spaghetti sauce, etc. in bulk and freeze in smaller quantities – it’s cheaper and much easier to clean up one big mess than to clean up 5 little messes!
17- Make extra batter when having waffles or pancakes – cook while you’re eating, then flash freeze on a foil-lined tray and place in large rectangle container. You’ll always have a quick “nosh” ready to heat and serve!
18- Freeze candles to make them burn more slowly and last longer. Works great for tapers—very thick candles may crack.


 

5 Back to School Lunch Tips

 

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These tried-and-true tips put the fun back into preparing simple and healthy, school lunches. Your kids will thank you!

1. Mix-It Up


 

4 Summer Shabbat Lunch Recipes

 

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Cooking during the summertime can sometimes be a pain. The heat makes you lethargic, so you want to cook something that’s not too tedious or time-consuming, as well as something that won’t make your kitchen feel like a sauna. Here are four great recipes to cook for Shabbat in the summertime.

Gazpacho with Multigrain Croutons

Gazpacho with Multigrain Croutons


 

Shabbat Third Meal Recipes

 

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This time of year when the days are so long and hot you really need to think about what to make for the Third meal on Shabbat.  The meal that comes before the end of Shabbat.  Many people wait 6 hours after eating meat until they can eat dairy so this meal usually can’t be dairy, but who wants meat after what is often a huge meat meal at lunch.  Tuna salad and egg salad are many people’s got tos, the classic Shalusetis meal, but in my family, no one really eats either of those.  Here are some third meal recipe ideas for these long hot days, I’ll keep them cool and light for you.


 

Cooking Measurements Equivalents

 

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After many years of sharing ideas through Tupperware demonstrations and “experimenting” with food and new recipes, I would like to share a chart I have given out at my parties to my customers.

Have you ever found the need to cut a recipe down, but can’t remember how many teaspoons are in a tablespoon or how many tablespoons in a cup?  Now you can just look at this chart and find the equivalent you need for your recipe in no time at all!


 

Organizing Your Time-If there’s a will,There’s...

 

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I have been asked many interesting questions throughout my years of being an active successful Tupperware Manager, author of a cookbook, and busy Mother, B”H.  The number one question is “How do you fit it all in”?  I am sure that many people reading this article can offer more great tips to add to this article.  I will share some of the ways I have been able to juggle my busy life to include finding the time to write this article!

Menu Planning


 

A Step by Step Guide to Perfect Cheesecake

 

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Here is a step-by-step how-to guide for creating a simple, delicious and creamy Cheesecake:

Preparation time: 30 minutes


 

Learn to Become a Blintz Queen with Step by Step...

 

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One of my favorite roles in the kitchen is being the Blintz Queen. I can stand for hours pouring the batter and swirling it around the pan to coat the bottom, while watching it harden and form into a delicious crepe.

The beauty about making crepes is that it’s similar to making a sandwich, giving you the ability to add any filling your heart desires. In general I have a savory palate and when it comes to crepes I love anything from chicken with fried onion to a mushroom or potato filling or even the classic cheese blintz. But in my mind there is nothing like a crepe for dessert.


 

5 Cheeses Everyone Should Know

 

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Hi everyone, I am The Cheese Guy or some may say “The Cheese-y Guy. My trademark is high end, small batch, primarily handmade, artisanal cheeses – particularly organic, kosher and low-fat.  My cheeses are a blend of creativity and flavor – a colorful fusion of my Eastern European Jewish heritage, the ethnic Italian neighborhood that I grew up in and my proximity to Amish farm territory.   The Cheese Guy – Raising the “CHEESE-Y” to an Art.  We partner with small and family owned dairy farms in order to produce our extra creamy jacks, crumbled blues, local sharp cheddars, tangy goats and imported Italian and European specialty cheeses.  Some of our cheese wheels are naturally aged and washed with organic extra virgin olive oil by Brent, in our New York cheese cellar. This is done in order to give our cheese a complex flavor and sharpness usually found in European style cheeses. We are excited to be taking Kosher cheeses to entirely new heights.

I know fancy cheeses are new to many of you, so think of this as a cheat sheet to get you started.  Cheese is very subjective and some are an acquired taste, but I urge you to at least open your palate and give them a taste.  All The Cheese Guy cheeses are certified kosher, the ones listed here are all OU and many are Chalav Yisroel (check the packaging).


 

With A Grain of Salt – 7 Types of Salt and...

 

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The extra credit question on my first ever chemistry test in high school was, “what household object is the chemical compound NaCl?”

Any takers?


 

The Perfect Grilled Cheese – Finally!

 

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Finals time is filled with anxiety over work, which creates a horrible anxiety about food. When am I going to eat, where will I go to eat, how long do I have to eat? Since most people will try to eat in as little time as they can, why not make something that will be delicious for every bite through the 3 minutes of eating it: the final grilled cheese.

Ingredients


 

How To Blanch and Shock Green Vegetables

 

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Blanching and shocking are exactly what they sound like! The technique is essential to properly cooking vegetables, ahead of serving, to a desired doneness, allowing you to reapply heat at the time you want to serve them. It is also a great way of keeping your vegetables longer so they don’t spoil or discolor. The technique works so well you can prepare tender vegetables several hours or even days ahead and then briefly sauté them, toss in a warm sauce or add to a roasted dish.

In the case of green vegetables the chlorophyll is released as a gas in the cells of the vegetable during the blanching process. In the shocking process the gas is trapped in those cells and stays there giving the vegetable its bright color. If you do not shock the vegetable the cooking process will continue even after you remove it from heat and will turn it an unappealing khaki grayish color.


 

Ground Beef Basics

 

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View my Kosher Beef Guide for a better understanding of the Kosher Forequarter.

Today, we are focusing on ground beef, which can come from the Chuck section or the Neck. We’ll talk about Chuck some other time.


 

Guide To Kosher Beef Cuts

 

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Click here for a large image of the the kosher forequarter

Who says we were dealt a lousy hand?  Who says the inferior cuts are on the forequarter?  There’s no downside to any cut on the forequarter.  The same nutrients are available from both ends.  We can’t change the hand we were dealt, but we can certainly change the way we play it.  Let’s raise the odds, take the pot and start cooking!  Remember, the “steaks” don’t have to be high, just tender.


 

Fat is Back – The 411 on Oils

 

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Nowadays, everything from rice bran to coconut oil line grocery store shelves.  All of these foods are spouting various health claims.  Should you switch? Reading this information will help you decide what is right for you and your family.  It’s important to know which oil you can safely incorporate into your family’s food plan.   It’s important to educate yourself on all the varieties of oil out there on the market.

 RICE BRAN OIL: