Kosher Cooking School

 

Cooking Brisket – Low and Slow

 

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Brisket is still trending! Something so traditional that can reinvent itself each year, has to be the trendiest cut around. There is always a new brisket recipe being circulated, in fact, I don’t think any cut of meat has been so well utilized as much as brisket. Whether pickled, boiled, steamed, roasted, barbequed or baked, the versatility of brisket cannot be beaten. Now that’s trendy!


 

The Art of Braising

 

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I love the chillier temperatures of late autumn and winter. The brisk air and snuggly sweaters make this my favorite time of year. I also especially love the food with its heartiness, big flavors and comforting textures. Cooking for my own family, for friends and clients is also a pleasure as everyone is actually hungry in the winter! People’s appetites are more timid in the warmer months, but everyone likes to eat when it is cold.

This is the time of year when dishes that take a long time to cook, like short ribs, stews, soups and casseroles, are a cook’s best friend. Not only can you create a satisfying hearty meal, but long slow braises benefit from TLC. You can really tell when a cook has put some love into their braised dish, because the end result has succulent flavorand texture.  Here are some chefs hints to make your braised dish luscious and  amazing.


 

Taking Stock – Learn to Make Your Own Stock

 

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“Worries go down better with soup than without.” (A Jewish proverb)

I love winter’s crisp-cold air and the way the sunlight casts shadows. I enjoy the long dark nights and I especially love to cook during the winter months. I hunker down in my kitchens and bring long cooked soups and stews together with aromatic herbs, dried mushrooms and root vegetables


 

Secret Chef Tips When Making Soup

 

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1. Start With Delicious Liquid

  • Soups are mostly water, but it’s often disguised as broth or stock, wine, milk or cream.
  • The vast majority of the time, the liquid in soup is stock or broth.
  • When adding wine to soups, add the wine after you have sweated off the vegetables.
  • Be sure to bring it to a boil and let it cook for at least 10 minutes to cook off the harshest of the alcohol.
  • For cream- or milk-based soups, use fresh dairy products.

2. Sweat the Roots Man!


 

Mask Cake Pop Tutorial and *Giveaway*

 

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I almost always stick with round cake pops, for some reason shaped pops intimidate me. A crazy cake? No problem… a shaped pop? Yikes! But when I was asked to do a guest blog post I thought what could I do that I haven’t done yet and haven’t seen yet? Purim is right around the corner and I feel like my thoughts go immediately to masks. I thought I’d go out of my comfort zone and try mask cake pops! Well I think I was pretty successful with it and I hope you will be too. Enjoy my tutorial and have a Happy Purim!

Materials:


 

Eating in Season – Cauliflower and Sunchokes

 

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Cauliflower is in season right now and we want to help you get more of it. Here are our tips on choosing, cooking and getting the most of this versatile vegetable.

How to select cauliflower: Select cauliflower that is firm and tightly packed and make sure that the heads are purely white with no brown spots.


 

Make Your Own Pudding

 

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When I was a little girl we visited my grandma every week and looked forward to it not just because she was so special but because she cooked all the foods we loved. Like chocolate pudding. My favorite.

I liked that she didn’t cover the pudding when it was still hot, so it cooled thick and soft but had a slightly chewy top that my brothers and I would peel off and eat first.


 

Cooking In Israel – Tips For The New Oleh

 

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Cooking in Israel is fabulous.  The melting pot of cultures and cuisines that is this country makes a trip to the supermarket an adventure that gives you a chance to expand your culinary repertoire.  But sometimes, especially for new olim, making something familiar and comforting can be a little challenging.  When I polled my oleh friends about what they found tricky in cooking here, most of the responses ran to unavailable ingredients, and most people were remarkably specific.

magic salt mix


 

Cooking Meat in Oven Bags

 

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Cooking a roast in a transparent cooking bag must be one of the most effective ways of keeping a roast moist without compromising on it’s golden brown look. And, once the roast is cooked you can make the most wonderful gravy from the juices left in the bag! What could be easier than placing a piece of meat with all your favourite herbs and spices into a sealed bag to cook? The convenience of not having to scrub the roasting pan once it is cooked! A double delight, a wonderful tasty, moist roast with no mess.

Bronzed Bag of Beef

Bronzed Bag of Beef


 

Stuffed Latkes

 

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A latke with a surprise in the middle is a great way to update the classic Chanukah dish. Be creative and stuff latkes with anything you have on hand. Maybe even use it as a way to get your kids to eat their veggies by adding peas, broccoli, tomatoes, zucchini, or spinach.

Start with my favorite Basic Latke Recipe.


 

Types of Flour

 

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Back in the day, when one wanted to buy flour in a supermarket, there was but one choice—all-purpose flour. Nowadays however, there is an abundance of flour available right in your supermarket. All-purpose flour, bread flour, unbleached flour, whole-wheat flour, cake flour, whole-wheat cake flour—the list goes on! Here is a breakdown of some common flours, and their optimal uses.

All-Purpose Flour. If a recipe doesn’t specify which flour to use, assume you should use all-purpose (or AP) flour. It has 8-11% gluten, which is suitable for cakes as well as some breads. AP flour is available in bleached and unbleached forms—both are light in color, but bleached flour has been chemically treated to be white, rendering it with less protein than its unbleached counterpart. Use AP flour in pie crusts, popovers, pancakes, quick breads, and yeast breads. This flour can last up to one year if sealed tightly and kept in the refrigerator, or 8 months in a cabinet.


 

How To Braise Meat

 

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I always feel a little glum on the day we switch the thermostat from air conditioning to heat. It means we’re bracing for winter and cold weather, heavy clothing and darkness by 4:00. There’s a smell too as the oil burner turns over for the first time to send hot air through the house.

But after a day or so I remember the bright side. First, I live in New England where the foliage is so glorious that people from everywhere drive up to take a look. So outside my window the view is entrancing.


 

7 Satisfying Slow Cooker Recipes

 

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The days are getting shorter, our lives our busier and when we get home all we really want is a nice hot meal waiting for us. Enter the slow cooker. These pots are not only for cholent.  Keep yours out all week and make easy set it and forget it recipes for everything from dinner to breakfast to dessert.

  White Bean Soup with Lemon and Garlic Cornbread

White Bean Soup with Lemon and Garlic Cornbread


 

Syrian Cooking With Poopa Dweck

 

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Today, I’m going to cook traditional Syrian dishes with Poopa Dweck, author of Aromas of Aleppo. Most of the dishes we’re going to make I have prepared before—one even weekly. As a Syrian Jew, it’s the food I grew up with as well. Yet, I still hope to unlock secrets of the Syrian kitchen, and bring access to this distinctive and tantalizing cuisine to Joy of Kosher readers. For all of you—we’re going to make maza (small delights) first, two types. Bastel, delightful small semolina pastries, filled with ground meat, and laham b’ajeen, mini meat pies, a favorite of all types of Jews everywhere. And for the main course—we’re preparing mehshi kusa, squash filled with ground meat and rice—with a surprisingly delicious side.

bastel-ground meat filled pastries

Bastel


 

Cooking Brisket – 5 Sweet Recipes

 

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For a busy cook, for whom cooking is not the priority, recipes that require a little bit of preparation followed by at least one fuss-free hour are choice. Perhaps this is why so many Jewish cooks cook with brisket. Since it is a cut from the lower chest of beef, it has a lot of connective tissue that needs to be properly broken down in order to tenderize. Braising the brisket as a pot roast for holiday meals is the perfect way to break down the connective tissue. Just ensure to keep the meat covered and that it has plenty of liquid to cook in to avoid a dry and stringy cut of beef.

Since braising meat can take around three hours to cook, it is the perfect recipe to prepare before a big holiday: prepare it, stick it in the oven, and work on all of the other patchke dishes while it cooks. Over the years, brisket has penetrated the collective unconscious as a “Jewish food.” This dates back to nineteenth century Europe, because it was, and remains today, a relatively cheap cut of meat. Since it is lean meat, almost none of it goes to waste. Brisket just takes a little bit of patience, so that it gets tender and delicious. Here are some brisket recipes for Rosh Hashanah.