Jewish Food

 

How To Celebrate a Tu b’Shevat Seder

 

 

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Tu b’Shevat is one of these hidden minor holidays, which haven’t gotten much attention until the last few decades. It is kind of a New Age, cutting age type of holiday with no ‘don’ts’ and not even any specific must ‘dos.’ If you are looking for spiritual renewal through mystical teachings, meditational practice and conscious mindful eating, then Tu b’Shevat has much to offer.

On Tu b’Shevat, the sap in the tree begins to flow once again to revitalize the tree. The secret of Tu b’Shevat gently whispers; “when everything looks dead, dark and murky, life, light and glory is hiding just below the surface.” The time when nothing seems to be happening on the outside is the beginning of the richest inner life. Tu b’Shevat begins a period of renewal for the individual and the community. On Tu b’Shevat we can tune into the redemption of spring. Even though we may be experiencing the winter of exile in both personal and collective stage of our lives on the outside, a new life force begins to emerge within our souls on the inside.


 

Purple Latkes with Truffle Yogurt and Arugula ...

 

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There is always room for one more latke recipe, right? I hope you said yes, because I can’t get enough!

I’m Amy, and I blog over at What Jew Wanna Eat. I take my Bubbe’s traditional Jewish recipes like brisket and kugel, and modernize them with new ingredients and techniques to make Bourbon and Coffee Braised Brisket with Cranberry Sauce and Caramel Apple Kugel. And latkes are no exception. When I first saw purple potatoes at my local supermarket, I knew they’d make the perfect fancy latke. But feel free to use sweet potatoes if you can’t find them. This recipe offers some tricks for the crispiest sweet potato latkes around! Topped off with a simple arugula and yogurt sauce. This certainly isn’t your Bubbe’s applesauce and sour cream!


 

Italian Jewish Food For Hanukkah

 

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Food. Italy. Jewish.

Put them all together and you’d be hard-pressed to come up with anything more mouthwateringly delectable. This recipe is my spin, Gnocco Fritto, a less well known classic of the Emilia Romagna region of Italy, where the famed gnocchi dumpling, rich in cheese and eggs and made with semolina flour (not potatoes), reigns supreme.


 

Easy Fried Sweets For Chanukah

 

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Ah, Hanukkah! It’s all about the fried, right?

Well, of course it’s about much more meaningful events, but when it comes to the food part, it’s all about the fried, to commemorate the oil found by the victorious Maccabees when they went to rededicate the Temple.


 

5 Things You Never Knew About Latkes

 

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Dedicated to the life and works of Gil Marks who shared this article with us last Chanukah in the Joy of Kosher with Jamie Geller magazine, may his memory be a blessing.

Judah Maccabee never saw a latke or a potato (or doughnut)… nor did medieval Jews.


 

Latkes That Just Happen To be Vegan and Gluten...

 

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Every year I try and come up with a new kind of latke.   I know I am not alone in this task, it seems all us foodie bloggers are doing the same, we can’t seem to leave well enough alone and like to find new spins on old classics.  There is always new inspiration too. New trendy flavors, new products and sometimes just new thoughts.

Growing up my mom would always make potato, zucchini and mixed vegetable as her latkes of choice.  She isn’t the type to use a recipe and they always came out great.  When I started making latkes, I am going to be honest, it took me some time to figure out how to get them just right.  Sometimes they wouldn’t really cook through to the middle and I was left with a raw potato taste and sometimes they didn’t stick together.  My first successful latke that my family loves actually comes from Joan Nathan.  Her thin crispy latkes use grated potatoes and eggs only, so they are also gluten free.  I found making them thin was the trick and I love the long strands of potato.  The recipe is so good I actually won a latke making contest quite a few years back.


 

Free 20 Recipe #WinnDixieKosher Chanukah Ebook

 

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4 Ways To Throw A Healthy and Easy Chanukah Party

 

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In my biggest, glossiest fantasies I imagine a very specific Chanukah party.

In this fantasy I’m calm and welcoming amidst all the cooking chaos.  (OK, I also want to be wearing my favorite clothes and the earrings my mother gave to me).

The menu: easy to prepare.
The food: gorgeous, delicious, healthy.


 

My 11 Latke Loves *Giveaway*

 

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Fried in oil and or dipped in chocolate are two of my general criteria for favorite foods.  Lucky me it’s Chanukah and there will be no shortage of fried in oil (dipped in chocolate) sweet and savory treats.  Here are my 11 latke loves:


 

The Secrets Behind Israeli Street Food

 

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Who hasn’t eaten a delicious dish at a restaurant or fast food counter and tried to replicate it at home?

When it comes to the replication of a dish from an elite restaurant, it is actually not as complicated as you might expect. Yes, it involves much preparation, buying special ingredients, but the cooking techniques, even if they look complicated, can be learned at any cooking school, through books, and even through online videos. Sometimes, chefs generously provide a pretty accurate recipe.


 

A New Very Flavorful Chicken Salad

 

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Making a fun mayonnaise is an easy way to perk up an old standby like chicken salad. Piri piri, sometimes called the African birdseye chili, is a chili pepper from the southern part of that continent and proud member of the hotter-than-heck family of peppers. My version is toned down considerably, with roasted poblanos. The dish offers a crunch from peanuts, often used in southern and central African cuisine, and a sweet bite of golden raisins, showing off a pinch of the complexity found in pan-Indian curries. And it’s all tucked in one delicious little sandwich.

Get my full recipe here.


 

Making a Kosher Reuben Sandwich

 

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Over the summer I read somewhere that the Reuben sandwich was one of the top 5 favorite sandwiches in this country. While the sandwich is associated with the Jewish deli and Jewish food, it must have been created when Kosher style came around. The traditional sandwich is inherently not kosher given that it combines meat, corned beed, and cheese, Swiss. That being said many kosher delis will serve it without the cheese and others have dressed it up, like Citron and Rose in Philadelphia, who makes an open faced lamb Reuben sans cheese.


 

The Best Stuffed Peppers With Variations

 

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Present a tray of multi colored stuffed peppers for an easy holiday dish that will surely elicit oohs and aahs. I am going to give you a few variations on this recipe that’s ready in 40 minutes: from start to serve.

Colors: Don’t stress on the colors – it’s just for presentation. Of course a green bell pepper is not as sweet as yellow, orange and red but after that consideration buy what’s on sale, available or pleasing to your eye.


 

The Search For The Real Yerushalmi Kugel

 

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I thought I knew what Yerushalmi Kugel was, a thin noodle kugel that was kind of peppery.  I am not a fan of the more classic sweet noodle kugel, but I have always liked this salty, peppery version.  I even made my version a while back with soba noodles, Soba Noodle Kugel.  This past Summer I was lucky to spend a few weeks in Israel and on my first Shabbat in Jerusalem I discovered the real Yerushalmi Kugel.

It was a remarkable site.  The kugel was maybe 2 feet in diameter and 2 feet high.  It was sliced up in layers and served piping hot.  It was a dark brown color and so I had to try it.  This kugel was sweet, but not too sweet in that it was more caramelized with a peppery accent.  It was really good and for the rest of the trip I wondered how to bring this recipe back to New York.


 

Fall 2014 Magazine Sneak Peek

 

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