Ingredient Spotlight

 

The Best Chicken Liver Recipes

 

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Once upon a time…. and it wasn’t that long ago either, we had to grill and kosher liver at home. Today, thank goodness, we can order it form some butchers grilled and already koshered for us.

I remember my mother having to kosher her own meat. I can still see those koshering racks, chunks of salt and lumps of ‘something’ floating about in aluminum buckets under our kitchen table, but come dinnertime, thank goodness, it had miraculously evolved into a magnificent roast.


 

Eggplant 101 – Cooking and Freezing

 

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Over the summer, I had an opportunity to try different dishes at several new restaurants around the area. I was surprised at the many ways that eggplant can be prepared.  Once my children married, B”H, and left the nest, I am the only one in my family who will eat eggplant parmesan.  I didn’t want to bake it, then waste it since I couldn’t possible eat it all by myself in one meal!  I also didn’t want to eat it day after day.  So for all of you “empty nesters” who try not to overcook, here is my method for eating what you enjoy when you want to have it and not waste a morsel of it!

I bake it in 9 X 13 pan.  Afterwards, I divide it up into individual portions and flash freeze them in my Tupperware Freezermates container.  I layer it on parchment paper in the container for easier removal.  Anytime I would like to eat it for a Dairy meal, all I need to do is pop one portion out for myself, while making something else for my husband.  Both of us are happy and I do not waste any food.  These days, I use this method for many other recipes where I don’t miss out on favorites when there is no one else who will share it with me.


 

8 Different Ways to Cook Carrots

 

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Eh, What’s Up Doc?

Carrots are an under valued vegetable.   They are pretty much staples in most homes, everyone seems to have a bag of baby carrots in their fridge and they are an excellent, crunchy and healthy anytime snack.  They are high in Vitamin A and have a sweet taste most people enjoy.  Still, I never think of serving them as a side dish.  I use them in soup and I pack them in lunches, but I rarely serve them for dinner.


 

Using Up Leftover Turkey

 

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There are some people who can eat turkey for days and they look forward to Thanksgiving every year just so that they can eat turkey sandwiches the rest of the week.  Then there are some people who enjoy the fresh turkey on Thanksgiving, but would rather not see it again until next Thanksgiving.  The only problem is you can’t seem to get a small turkey anywhere and of course if you have a big crowd you want to make sure you have enough.  With all the sides, some people’s favorite part of the meal, there is inevitably turkey leftover.

If you are in the camp of people looking for new ways to serve up your turkey, here are a few suggestions.


 

8 Nights of Idaho Potato Latkes *Giveaway*

 

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The classic potato latke, fried to a crispy golden brown and emerging from the pan still sizzling, is a family favorite during Hanukkah and year round.  Although the standard ingredients are simple enough, I have seen versions with no added flour, sautéed onions, thick, fluffy, grated by hand, shredded or even mashed.  What makes a really great latke is a really great potato, which is why your search should start and end in Idaho.

Traditional Potato Latkes


 

4 Easy Dinner Recipes Using Leftover Rice

 

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Do you ever wonder how rice seems to multiply.  Maybe it is just me, but I can never make the right amount of rice, there is always too much.  Don’t get me started on leftover Chinese take out.  Luckily for you and me I discovered that leftover rice is actually like a surprise present.  You can even stick it in the freezer and take it out later to turn into a whole new dish that practically begs for day old (or even weeks old) rice.

Mushroom Fried Rice

Mushroom Fried Rice


 

The Heart of The Cocktail

 

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It isn’t just for ad execs on Madison Avenue, cocktails have always been a part of popular culture.  Until now, I had only ever tried the basics, Martini (not my thing, Bond can keep it), Gin and Tonic, Screwdrivers, Margaritas and Mojitos.  Once I started to really enjoy wine I didn’t even consider cocktails except on vacation to a tropical destination.  Over the years, friends and Shabbat guests would enjoy single malt scotch and bourbon, but straight liquor was never that appealing to me. Maybe I owe a debt of gratitude to Don Draper, but we are living during a renaissance of the cocktail culture and my rocks glass will never be the same.

My most recent concoction was a mint and lime Julep


 

Top Ten Honey Recipes and Hosting Tips

 

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Cause I am feeling sweet I’m sharing my top 10 honey recipes along with my top 10 tips for hosting this holiday.  But not before a word from our sponsor… honey, the sweetest of all the simanim this Rosh Hashanah.

What are simanim?


 

10 Ways You Can Use Tomatoes

 

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Don’t you just love tomatoes in the Summer?  Unless you live in Israel (finally, recipes you guys can use all year), the fresh tomatoes during the year often make me forget that I even like tomatoes.  I can usually do okay with grape tomatoes all year, but you can’t do everything with those little guys and when you actually get a fresh juicy red ripe tomato you must find fresh juicy ways to use them.

Here we are sharing 10 fresh ways to use tomatoes that are worth a trip to the Farmer’s market or just might convince you to grow your own next year.


 

The 7 Best Zucchini Recipes – New Ways To...

 

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I will never forget the first Summer I was part of a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture).  It was about 10 years ago and I was living in D.C. and they had a drop off location on the way home from work, so it was perfect.  Each week I would go and discover new produce from the farm I supported including many foods I had never seen before.  Some things they had less of and some they had more of, that is the nature of farm business.  We didn’t get any edible corn that year, but we did get an abundance of Summer squash.  Once they started handing out squash, they didn’t stop.  It was the one vegetable that you could take as you wanted and there was still more to go around and oh, I forgot to mention the size of some of these squash, they were enormous.  If only I knew then what I know now, there are so many ways to cook squash and they are all delicious.  Of course there is kugel and muffins and latkes and you can find those and more here when you search for zucchini, but when those get old check out these newbies.

Zucchini Spaghetti Primavera


 

Israel Substituion Guide

 

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Editor’s intro:

`A couple weeks ago we posted a Call To Cooks in Israel to help us start this Israel Substitution Guide to help new and old olim adapt recipes with ingredients they can find in Israel.  We had some fantastic responses with lots of tips and advice already in the comments over there.  Based on the questions we got and some of our own, Dvora has compiled this guide to help others.


 

New Recipes with Beets

 

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I’m embarrassed to admit that before Joy of Kosher’s #GoForTheGold’s campaign, I had never tried a Gold’s product. Surprising, yes. I knew they made horseradish, but since gefilte fish is a rarity in my cooking I never used it. Nevertheless, I was up for the challenge of using one of their many condiments in my cooking and I picked that purple jar of Borscht.


 

What is Harissa?

 

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Let’s get spicy.

I’m talkin’ burn your mouth on fire spicy. Can you handle it?


 

What is Zaatar?

 

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Za’atar is a classic Middle Eastern spice blend that is both tangy and refreshing. Za’atar is generally made from sumac, thyme, roasted sesame seeds, and sea salt. While many of za’atar’s ingredients are found also in Mediterranean cuisine, it’s a staple in the Middle East. Za’atar is a synch to make at home by combining an equal amount of the spices listed above with salt and pepper to taste. Of course, when time is an issue, you can also find it in many supermarkets and Middle Eastern shops, find kosher Zaatar here (it makes a great Father’s day gift).

**Make your own Za’atar by combining 1 tablespoon each of sumac, thyme, roasted sesame seeds and sea salt, you can also add marjoram and/or oregano if desired and adjust all to taste.  (If you can’t eat sesame seeds then leave them out.  If you don’t have sumac it won’t be quite the same, but you can try zested lemon peel).**


 

Hot Recipes With Wasabi Sauce

 

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Wasabi is a Japanese horseradish typically available as a dry powder we reconstitute to use as a topping for sushi.  It’s strong pungent flavor pairs perfectly in many recipes from vegetables to chicken to fish.  Gold’s, long famous for horseradish, uses their sharp vegetable to make flavorful sauce with just the right bite.  We have prepared a tasty Pan Seared Salmon basted with Gold’s wasabi sauce that everyone will love as well as Hot & Spicy Wings covered in this liquid green gold.

I always look for a way to change the standard Shabbat menu without taking away from the classic elements of a fish, soup, and chicken.  I find that gefilte fish isn’t always a crowd pleaser, yet a fresh piece of salmon tends to have adults and children asking for more.   After continuously eating dairy, dairy, and more dairy during Shavuot, it’s nice to give  yourself a break with a low calorie, yet flavorful appetizer.  Finding a way to get your family to eat healthy can be difficult, but searing the salmon allows the fish to become crisp on the outside, and juicy on the inside.