Ingredient Spotlight

 

Everything Is Better with Tahini

 

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When I was growing up, we stayed far away from tahini.  My dad has a sesame allergy and I didn’t really know what I was missing.  After all, tahini was still largely overlooked as a mainstream product in the U.S.  I remember once trying some packaged halva and I didn’t care to try that again.  I also remember having a can of tahini that blended the sesame paste with lemon and water already for you, and it tasted about as bad as it sounds describing it now.

It has only been the last several years that I have come to LOVE tahini (sorry Abba) and I expect more and more people will be jumping on the tasty tahini bandwagon soon.


 

Caviar For Shabbat

 

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This article is dedicated to my father, who with out fail, reminds me every three day yom tov to do eruv tavshilin.  Eruv Tavshilin refers to the prepared food that is set aside with a prayer before a yom tov, that allows us to cook and prepare foods on a yom tov for Shabbat when Shabbat is the following day.  This is most often necessary when two days of holiday lead into Shabbat as we have been enjoying this year.  Get all the details of Ervu Tavshilin here and don’t worry if you have forgotten or didn’t know about it before, there are many that allow you to rely on the eruv of the Rabbi in the community who will have everyone in mind.

In my family as I am sure in many it is customary to use a hard boiled egg and challah or matzah for the Eruv.  It is easy to eat the bread at any meal, but no one in my family really likes to sit down to a hard boiled egg, that is how I started to serve Caviar on Shabbat.


 

What Are Boerewors? *Giveaway*

 

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Boerewors are a type of sausage popular in South Africa made from minced beef and spices in a sausage casing. These sausages are preserved with salt and vinegar and are nitrate free. In South Africa, Boerewors are often made on the grill (they call it the Braai) and traditionally formed in a continuous spiral or cut up in 5 inch pieces.


 

Why You Should Add Leeks To Your Rosh Hashanah...

 

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Everyone knows that Rosh Hashanah is apples and honey time. But there’s a growing tradition to include other symbolic foods on the menu during the High Holiday season — foods that evoke our wishes for G-d to bless and protect us in the year ahead.

Leeks for instance.


 

5 Ways to Cook With Ground Turkey

 

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Ask Us: We just started buying more ground turkey. Any ideas? I’ve already done a few varieties of turkey meat balls.

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Brisket Is Best When…

 

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…overcooked.  Really!  If you want that tender, soft, melt-in-your-mouth, fork tender, cuts like “butter” beef then brisket is your best friend, your baby, your #1.  Although in Israel it’s designated by the number #3 but that’s neither here nor there.  Most often we cookbook authors will end a brisket recipe with instructions to let it rest for at least 15 minutes before slicing against the grain and serving.  But really, there is a better way to do that and so much more.  Listen very closely to what I am writing and you are reading here:  No matter what the recipe tells you, mine included brisket is best when…


 

Morad Winery Fruit Wines and Liqueurs *Giveaway*

 

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Nestled at the foothills of Israel’s fertile Carmel Mountains Morad Winery is famous for their distinctive fruit wines and liqueurs made from nature’s harvest.


 

The Independence Day and Molasses Connection

 

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It’s almost July 4th and every American is thinking fireworks and parades or lemonade and fried chicken but my mind turns to molasses.

Really.


 

Morad Pomegranate Wine for Dinner and a Cocktail

 

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We all know that wine isn’t just for drinking (you can cook with it too) but did you know that it’s important that the wine you cook with should be just as tasty as the wine you want to drink? In fact, when you open up a bottle of wine to pour into your favorite stews and sauces, it’s a good idea to pour yourself a glass to drink while you cook. That’s an order! And since I must practice what I preach, I’m opening up a bottle of Morad Pomegranate Wine right now to drink while I write about this incredible sweet and sour wine made entirely of the finest pomegranates from Israel.


 

10 Sweet and Savory Honey Recipes

 

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This post and giveaway is sponsored by The National Honey Board.

Honey does more than sweeten tea and suppress a cough. Honey has many versatile benefits in the kitchen, from replacing other granulated sweeteners in baked goods and other desserts to balancing the acidity and salt of salad dressings with a natural sweetness and mouth-filling texture. For many home cooks who think about honey during breakfast, they may be surprised to learn that many savory dishes will also benefit from adding honey.


 

Are Quail Eggs Kosher?

 

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From faux crab and shrimp to premium Kobe-Wagyu beef and bison to gourmet parve ‘cheese’, the kosher world has welcomed a lot of non-traditional, cutting-edge fare over the past few decades.  Never a people to settle for regular old matzah ball soup and gefilte fish, kosher food enthusiasts have always been ones to up the ante in kosher cuisine by introducing unusual and exotic foods into our repertoire. Ever since an O-U sponsored ‘Mesorah dinner’ at Levana Kirschenbaum’s famed restaurant in 2004, which served exotic foods not commonly found on a kosher menu-including quail, quail and quail eggs have gained much attention and interest from many kosher foodies and consumers. And why not, it’s all  kosher, isn’t it?

As it turns out- it’s not that simple. While the Torah provides physical signs and characteristics in mammals (i.e. that they have both split hooves and chew their cud) and fish (i.e. that they have both fins and scales) that identify them as a kosher species, it does not do the same for birds. Rather the Torah lists 24 families of non-kosher birds and leaves it to be assumed that accordingly the remaining species of birds are all kosher. But its still not that simple! According to tradition, after the Torah was given, Moses identified and detailed to the Jewish people which birds were permitted to be eaten, and which were forbidden. This oral tradition, known as a mesorah, has been passed down from generation to generation for thousands of years. Of course, many things get lost over time- and this is no exception. Thus the status of the acceptability of many birds as kosher is not as widely recognized or accepted as the birds for which we have a stronger based tradition and they are thus forbidden to be eaten according to the Shulchan Aruch (Code of Jewish  Law). For instance- it is universally accepted that chicken is a kosher bird while even today some people will still not accept turkey as a kosher bird. According to the O-U’s website, many families of birds have been accepted as kosher in different localities at one time in history, including goose, pigeons, doves, and of course- quail.


 

Blue Cheese Pizza with Buffalo “Chicken&...

 

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During the whole month of May we have been showcasing the new line of Sincerely Brigitte gourmet flavored cheeses.  Read all about the cheese and the varieties here and note there are more flavors coming.  We have also been giving away cheese samplers all month with the final winner just announced today.  We will continue to bring you more recipes showing the best ways to use these cheeses to liven up any meal on our Sincerely Brigitte recipe page and we hope all of you will share your own too, Submit Recipes here.  For today’s recipe I am sharing one of my new favorite pizzas, Blue Marble Buffalo “Chicken” Pizza.

I like getting creative with my toppings and I also like finding new ways to prepare seitan or other fake meats.  I often make a huge batch of homemade seitan and use it over a couple of weeks in different ways.  I recently tried it with Hot Sauce and butter to create vegetarian buffalo wings.  Sure you can make a version of buffalo wings without real butter as we all have done to make it kosher, but if you want to try the butter and hot sauce combo it works really well on seitan and you can even dip it in real blue cheese.


 

Blue Marble Quiche

 

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Last week I told you about a new line of kosher cheeses that are flavored, learn more about Sincerely Brigitte cheeses here.  In addition to giving away a sampler pack every week in May, I am also sharing a recipe to help you out on your flavor adventure.  This week I am starting with a simple quiche using the Blue Marble cheese.  I wanted to start with this one, because I thought it would be the most difficult for us all to use, especially if you are not a blue cheese fan.

This cheese is particularly nice because it is a mix of blue and cheddar and works really well melted in many dishes.  I actually already have a second recipe for it, but you will have to wait for that one.  Of course you could use any cheddar in this quiche, but the subtle blue cheese flavor really sets this recipe apart.  I usually make quiche with frozen spinach and for every day that is fine, but try some fresh baby spinach next time and lots of onions for a real show stopper.


 

11 Different Things You Can Make With Sausage, and...

 

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Editor’s Note: Every time we post a recipe with sausage we get at least one comment about sausage not being kosher.  Then when we put a call out for you to Ask Us Anything, you asked: “Some of your recipes require sausage links. I can’t recall ever sieing kosher sausage in the supermarket. Which brands are kosher and where can I find them?” Yosef Silver to the rescue with everything you ever wanted to know about kosher sausage.

Answer:


 

Healthy Gourmet Flavored Salt From The Dead Sea

 

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A startup founded by Israeli environmental activist Ari Fruchter, recognized that the unique mineral rich salt composition of the Dead Sea equals or surpasses other super premium table salts, like Fleur De Sel and Pink Himalayan Sea Salt. Inspired by a small Palestinian salt-field on the edge of the Dead Sea which had been successfully harvesting culinary salt for several decades, a business idea was born and a subsequent Kickstarter campaign for Naked Sea Salt reached its goal in less than 48 hours.