In the joyofkosher Kitchen

 

Best of Kosher Kosher Food Blog Winner –...

 

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Kosher Camembert is the winner of our Best of Kosher very competitive Kosher Food Blog Award.  Written by Gayle Squires also known as Zahavah.  She loves to read cookbooks as if they were novels and is always looking for the next destination.   Let’s find out some more about Gayle.
1. Tell us about you and/or your company:

Kosher Camembert is a food blog that I launched about three years ago after visiting Paris and meeting Clotilde Dusoulier (Chocolate & Zucchini). What initially began as a means of keeping a recipe log has turned into an amazing outlet for creativity and learning. I have developed a voice, gained photography skills, and taken a few cooking and baking classes. While working a full-time job (health care IT), I try to post new recipes weekly. I am an untrained cook and like to to share recipes that remind me of my travels, often meeting with local chefs when abroad.


 

What Are Heirloom Beans?

 

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I’ve heard of heirloom tomatoes, but heirloom beans? As someone who tries not to eat too much meat and a family that jumps for beans, I was so excited to learn about heirloom beans.

An heirloom is something that has been passed down for generations through family members.  Some people have jewelry and some people have seeds.  An heirloom plant is a varietal that has not been used in the modern large scale farm production, but rather passed down through family or farm from an earlier period in time.  Steve Sando, founder of Rancho Gordo, defines them as pure seeds, that when planted will produce the same kind of bean every time.   I remember buying a special heirloom variety of popcorn at a local farmers market a few years ago, they said the seeds were passed down in their family for years and it happened to be the best popcorn I have ever had.


 

In the JoyofKosher Kitchen with The Dash Cookbook

 

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The Dash cookbook, inspired kosher recipes for the seasoned palate was created as a fundraiser for the Torah Academy for Girls in Far Rockaway.  It is available for purchase through TAG at 718-471-8444.

Why did you name the book Dash?


 

Recipes for Dorot Frozen Herbs

 

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When I first discovered frozen cubes of ginger, garlic and herbs from Dorot at the local kosher market, I couldn’t believe it.  What a great idea!  It’s about time someone came out with an easy to use alternative to dried herbs or jarred garlic.  How many times had I bought a huge bouquet of dill for chicken soup, only to find a bag of mush on the bottom of my fridge a few weeks later?  These Dorot cubes give the taste of fresh garlic and herbs, without the chopping and the waste.

Charoset with Ginger


 

Blogger Spotlight: Amy Kritzer (What Jew Wanna Eat...

 

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Tell us about your blog and how you got started:

In December of 2010 I was working at an uninspired corporate job that I wasn’t passionate about, so I started What Jew Wanna Eat (WJWE) as a creative outlet. I called up my Bubbe Eleanor, and of course she was kvelling when I told her about the idea! She sent me dozens of her favorite traditional Jewish recipes. To add my personal touch, I twisted each recipe a bit to make them my own such as pumpkin hummus or dark chocolate mandel bread. Before I knew it, WJWE turned into so much more! I quit my job and now am in culinary school, teaching cooking classes and food writing on the side. I love it!


 

Blogger Spotlight: Lisa Rose (Real Food Digest)

 

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Tell us about your blog and how you got started:

Real Food Digest is about inspiring people to cook more at home from natural unrefined ingredients and the impact this approach has on our health and the sustainability of the environment. Real Food Digest is also about reconnecting to the roots of our Jewish tradition – our holidays are based on an agricultural calendar and many of our customs have a connection to nature.


 

Basil – Restaurant Review

 

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I am in love.

Yes I know, again.


 

In the Joy of Kosher Kitchen with Ernie Weir from...

 

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Hagafen Cellars is located in Napa Valley, California and was founded in 1979 by Irit and Ernie Weir, as the first kosher winery in California.  At a time when fine kosher wine was almost an oxymoron, Weir sought to produce a wine that can hold its own against the best of the Valley yet upholds the strictest of kosher standards.  Judging by the number of gold medals and now frequent accolades in mainstream publications like The Wall Street Journal and New York Times, he has succeeded beyond his own wildest imaginations.

I recently had the chance to enjoy the 2007 Hagafen Cabernet Franc and the 2009 Hagafen Merlot.  Both are elegant red wines with soft, silky tannins and red, ripe fruits.  With Passover approaching, now is a perfect time to stock up and bring a bottle over to wherever you are spending the Seder — just make sure you also get a couple for yourself.


 

Blogger Spotlight: Mekhal Kramer (Test My Recipes)

 

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Tell us about your blog and how you got started:
I have always been a food enthusiast. I love cooking my own recipe creations along with the traditional foods from my family which is from Iraq/India. My blog is a way to document my recipes, and a place to give my readers easy, healthy and accessible recipes. To come up with a “clean” recipe you often have to do a lot of recipe testing. It can take a great deal of time to perfect a recipe, and be quite expensive. As a busy mom working full time I do not have enough time to test and perfect every recipe. This is where my blog is unique. I post a new recipe each week, and I also ask for feedback from my readers. If I receive enough feedback on a recipe I will revise the recipe and post a new “Final” recipe. In addition to posting a recipe every week, I write a food related article as well. This is where I share some insights as a busy home cook and food lover. Topics range from spices, to food book reviews, to the essentials for your pantry, to cheese.

What is your earliest cooking memory?
My earliest cooking memory is cooking with my Grandma. She used to babysit me while my parents were at work. She always had me in the kitchen with her and used to let me help with whatever she was making, from cookies to meatballs. My grandma used to love watching cooking shows like The Frugal Gourmet and Julia Child and I used to love watching them with her. I also have a lot of memories of my dad and aunt cooking for huge parties and me sneaking around the kitchen trying to see what they were doing.


 

In the Joy of Kosher Kitchen with Aviva Kanoff

 

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Aviva Kanoff is an artiste extraordinaire. She paints, teaches a mixed media art class, and dabbles in photography. Her creative approach to life led her to artistic experimentation with food, and after years of creating her own recipes and working as a personal chef, she wrote The No-Potato Passover, an expression of her intuitive understanding of flavors, aromas, and colors.

What inspired you to write a Passover cookbook without potatoes?


 

In the JoyofKosher Kitchen with Alex Haruni from...

 

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The Dalton Winery began in 1995 when the Haruni family moved from England to settle in Israel. The winery began in makeshift premises in Moshav Kerem Ben Zimra in the Upper Galilee, but is now a state of the art winery with its own home overlooking the Hula Valley just five kilometers from Lebanon, standing in the shadow of Mount Hermon.

I had the chance to speak to Alex Haruni, owner and winemaker at Dalton Winery.


 

Blogger Spotlight: Sina Mizrahi (The Kosher Spoon)

 

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Tell us about your blog and how you got started:
I fell obsessively into photography as a hobby around the time my daughter turned one. Take it from experience, it’s not a practical time to start learning and practicing with an infant turned wild toddler. She would not glance at the camera without trying to pull the lens out. So I gave in (a little) and gave her a break. A while later, I somehow found myself reading “top 100 mom blogs” on babble.com, and felt an instant connection to the food blog format. I love cooking, I love photographing, and in my imagination I’m a witty, sharp writer (clearly very far from the truth). It seemed the perfect medium for me to express my creativity. Soon thereafter The Kosher Spoon was born, connecting me to my fellow talented Jewish women and giving me the opportunity to shoot things that sit still and look pretty.

What is your earliest cooking memory?
Growing up, my mother’s kitchen was the place the family (and neighbors and friends) would congregate to eat, drink, talk, laugh. But it was exactly that, my mother’s kitchen. None of us even considered cooking or baking, the kitchen was perpetually off limits. Until one time when I was about eight years old, I convinced my mother to let me bake a chocolate cake from one of those boxed mixes. I even promised to clean up after myself. She reluctantly agreed and and with much excitement I put together the three ingredients and poured the batter into a pan. The minutes passed, and I occupied myself with other things. My mom took the cake out of the oven and as it was cooling I knew I didn’t want to be the first one to taste it. I convinced my brother to take just one bite. Poor thing, he couldn’t even swallow it. He spat it out with such an exaggerated gag that it sealed my decision to never step foot in the kitchen. That resolve held up well for 14 years (save for a few necessary stints) until I got married.


 

Best of Kosher New Cookbook Winner – Feed Me...

 

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Feed Me Bubbe – Recipes and wisdom from America’s favorite online grandmother – published September 2011 is not just another cookbook.  This book takes you into Bubbe’s kitchen based on the online cooking show by Bubbe and Avrom Honig.  It includes a Yiddish word of the day, stories and words of encouragement to make you feel like you are with your Bubbe.  Feed Me Bubbe was voted as the Best New Kosher Cookbook in our Best of Kosher Awards.  Let’s find out more.

How did Feed Me Bubbe come to be?


 

Amy’s New ‘Light & Lean Meals’

 

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Last year, Amy’s debuted a new line of frozen meals under the ‘Light & Lean’ label.  Amy’s has been providing high quality and affordable organic frozen foods from spinach or pizza pockets (my kids’ personal favorites), burritos, frozen dinners and more.  All their products are organic, vegetarian, and made without the use of trans fats or GMOs.

Company co-founder and Amy’s mom, Rachel Berliner, started the company to help busy families create healthful and quick meals.    Amy’s products have always been free of meat, eggs, trans fats and corn syrup, but now they are expanding to meet the needs of a wider array of special dietary needs.  They have vegan and gluten free products and this new line of frozen meals have fewer calories and less fat for those trying to lose weight or reduce their sodium intake.


 

Blogger Spotlight: Ronnie Fein

 

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About my Blog:

I started Kitchen Vignettes as something like a memoir. Like when Proust nibbled the famous madeleine cookie and it evoked enough memories for him to write a book. There are so many foods, so many different recipes that call up my memories, whether it is for some traditional dish that my mother or grandmother cooked or a special dish I ate in a restaurant or while traveling in a foreign country or while I was experimenting with an ingredient for an article I was writing or even some concoction I remember seeing or tasting at school when I was a kid. So, many of the blog posts on Kitchen Vignettes are just that: little reminiscences that speak to why I am choosing a particular recipe to share. I believe that when people read about food memories it also evokes their own memories. And that may make them want to cook whatever dish it is that I’m writing about. And that makes me feel terrific, as if I have accomplished something not just for me but whoever is reading the blog. And I hope it gives them some good time with their own memories.