Seasonal Cooking

 

10 Light Summer Pasta Dishes

 

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Pasta is delicious and comforting food any time of year.  In the winter we go hearty with pumpkin and heavy cream sauces, but in the Summer we like to lighten it up with fresh tomatoes and basil, extra veggies and pesto.   Chavi Sperber shares her recipes for Linguine Grilled Summer Vegetable Salad and an all vegetable Zucchini Spaghetti Pasta Salad in our Summer issue of JoyofKosher.  We have so many more ideas here online.


 

Helpful Hints for Great Salads

 

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When Spring has finally sprung, and the farmers’ markets are bursting with the season’s new bounty, there is no better time to refresh our salad making skills.  It’s time to get creative and gear up for the fresh flavors that we would love to grace our tables!   Salad-making may involve little to no actual cooking, but there is quite a bit involved to making a good salad great. Read on for hints and tips toward creating memorable salads your family and guests will love!

Helpful Hints for Great Salads!


 

In Season: English Peas

 

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Spring produce season doesn’t really kick off for me until I see the sprightly-green shelling peas at the farmer’s market. Piled high and begging to be plucked from their pods and nibbled, I love that table, groaning with possibilities. Ah, sweet, sweet English peas.


 

Strawberry Frozen Yogurt

 

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I am so happy to make an appearance here at JoyofKosher.com. I am so honored to be asked by the loyal and friendly staff of Joy of Kosher to develop a recipe for Shavuot, along with my photographs.  Thank you from the bottom of my heart for this wonderful opportunity to connect with your readers!

As Jonathan and I were heading up to Massachusetts last month for Passover, I asked him what was his favorite ice cream? He responded ‘not ice cream, but frozen yogurt is my favorite’, which completely took me by surprise.  When I thought about it a tad longer it all made complete sense.  During his undergraduate days at Tel Aviv University, his barren refrigerator would always be graced by a couple of family size containers of a strawberry yogurt drink, called Prili (fruit-for-me). He would have one family size Prili for breakfast every day. He would shake it first before removing the aluminum top. When I saw early strawberries popping up here and there at the farmers markets recently, I couldn’t resist getting a couple of pints to make a Frozen Strawberry Yogurt dessert to celebrate Shavuot, inspired by Jonathan’s love for Prili.


 

Ingredient Spotlight: 3 Parsley Recipes

 

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Parsley is the Rodney Dangerfield of herbs. It gets no respect. It’s because parsley is common and so we take it for granted. But apples are common too. And so are lemons and carrots, but people don’t pass these up like they do parsley.  I’m just saying.


 

Barley Recipes To Celebrate History

 

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In modernity, after the destruction of the second Temple, the food most associated with Passover is matzah.  However, Passover was originally known as Hag Ha-Aviv (the holiday of spring) and it was connected to the beginning of the barley harvest.  The newly harvested barley could not be eaten until after the first sheaves of grain were offered to the Priests the second day of Pesach. The word Omer means “a measure or portion” (referring to the grain), and the Counting of the days of the Omer, in biblical times, coincided with the time period between the barley harvest and the harvesting of the first spring wheat, traditionally when Shavuot was celebrated.

The Romans and Greeks in ancient times prayed to their Goddesses of grain for a productive harvest.  The Jews, however, prayed to God to watch over the crops during the typical windy season in Israel.  A northern wind could bring rains that would destroy the new barley crop and a southern, hot, wind could stop the growth of the new wheat before it was to be harvested.  Barley was the mainstay of the Jew’s diet in biblical times because it was a very adaptable plant to cultivate in the different climates of Israel and very resistant to the dry desert heat.


 

10 Chicken Recipes That Reheat Well

 

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This time of year it is a challenge to find recipes that won’t be dry and tasteless by the time everyone comes back from Shul on Friday night.   Chicken being the most budget friendly can easily dry out, but there are some recipes that hold up better than others.  In general saucy chickens with or without the bones can stay pretty moist as long as they don’t lose their liquid, so add a little extra and don’t let it heat at too a high a temperature.  Breaded, fried or baked, chicken usually does pretty well too, the coating helps lock in the moisture and it is still very good if you have to serve it room temperature.   Here are ten  chicken recipes that would be perfect for a late Friday night or any weekday dinner.

Apricot Chicken Tajine


 

Smokin’ Recipes For a Spring Barbecue

 

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With Passover a wonderful memory and your matzo coma beginning to wane, you must be ready for a dish that has no resemblance to anything you might have eaten throughout the holiday.  It’s time to put away your braising pot, toss your oven mitts to the side and retire your roasting pan at least for the week. The following are some wonderful dishes that sing spring and wake up your taste buds to the promise of a new season.

Pineapple Mango Chutney


 

Cheesey Matzah Dishes

 

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Just because it’s Pesach does not mean that we cannot have lasagna or pizza – it just means we have to make them differently. Using matzah instead of noodles or pizza dough is a genius idea – I have tasted some Matzah Lasagnas and Pizzas that are out of this world. How do you use matzah to replicate chametz dishes?

Enjoy these recipes:


 

Chol Hamoed Breakfast, Snacks, and Lunch

 

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We’ve cooked and cooked to prepare for Pesach—but now it’s the first morning of chol hamoed, and our families begin to roll back into the kitchen. They want to eat again! Serving refreshing, filling, and light Pesach breakfast and lunches—while offering variety—can be almost as big of a challenge as preparing yesterday’s yom tov feast.

From filling and hearty breakfasts, to easy-to-pack take-along lunches for chol hamoed outings, to the snacks that tide them over until dinner, these Pesach solutions will satiate your family from dawn to dusk.


 

Five Compote Recipes

 

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Most people only eat compote on Passover. Maybe because it’s so much easier to make it for dessert than to patchke with 5 dozen eggs and potato starch? It is so wonderful to have the house smelling of fruit and cinnamon. Nothing like it.  There was even a whole food holiday devoted to it last month – National Fruit Compote Day, check out the article for fun facts about this French dessert.  Here are five fabulous compote recipes, but they are so versatile – how do you compote?

Dried Fruit Compote 


 

Refreshed! Chol Hamoed Dinners

 

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After days of heavy yom tov eating, our stomachs and taste buds are likely craving lighter fare. These wholesome dairy, pareve, and meat options offer a refreshing change of pace—and are easy to prepare after a busy day.

Eggplant Parmesan Stacks


 

Tips For The Perfect Matzo Brei

 

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Once we’ve gotten ourselves past the Seder accoutrements ~ the ceremonial foods, the hearty meal and the sweet desserts, we can look forward to some of the other holiday treats.  In my household, running a close second to the chocolate covered matzo, is matzo brei.  Matzo brei is the quintessential Passover brunch food; although it’s just as appreciated as a light dinner, too.

Loosely translated, matzo brei is matzo fried with eggs.  And while that is often the case, it can be so much more!  For instance, is your favorite style more matzo than egg, like a pancake; or is it more egg than matzo ~ frittata style?


 

15 Passover Potato Recipes

 

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Whenever you talk about Passover cooking, everyone groans and says they are so sick of potatoes. But potatoes on Passover don’t have to be boring. The average American eats about 140 lbs of potatoes every year – that’s a lot. But just think – potatoes can be mashed and fried, boiled and grilled, chipped and chopped. Raw or cooked – everyone enjoys potatoes in their diets.

Here are some great Passover Potato recipes:


 

Pesach Supper Savers

 

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After the Seder Plate is washed and the haggadahs are shaken out and put away, there is an inner sigh of relief mixed with contentment, a feeling of release after all those weeks of build-up leading up to Seder night. We are full, we are sated with the work of our hands…that is, until the next day when the festive intermediary days of Chol HaMoed are upon us and somehow, despite all the food….everyone is hungry. Again?

Chol HaMoed Pesach is a particularly beautiful time of year – with spring buds and blossoms all abloom, it presents wonderful opportunities to spend time with family, go on outings or activities and to leave our kitchens! Nonetheless, at the end of the day, there are still hungry mouths waiting for dinner, especially after a long day out. Now is the perfect time to get organized and anticipate those “forgotten” meals of Pesach. A little advanced planning now will go a long way towards ensuring stress-free meals on days when time and energy are at a premium. Plan a holiday week menu now to minimize shopping trips and maximize your family-time.