Seasonal Cooking

 

Chef Jeff’s Fresh is Best Recipes

 

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Chef Jeff is the well known proprietor of the Kosher restaurant Abigael’s in New York City.  He really knows his food. After touring through the Farmer’s Market with Cheff Jeff Nathan of Abigael’s we get to cook and eat his fabulous foods.

Jeff Nathan's Asian Chicken Stir Fry


 

The Ultimate Veggie Sliders *Giveaway*

 

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Growing up as a vegetarian, there were two things I could expect to eat at school and community barbecues: Hamburger buns and potato chips.

Yeah, there didn’t tend to be too many veggie alternatives for people like me. Now don’t get me wrong, I really like potato chips. It’s just that something was always missing. Something like…my entire meal.


 

Instant Fruit Sorbets

 

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Here is how to easily whip up a batch of all-natural fruit sorbet.  You can use frozen fruit from the supermarket or make your own.

Peel and cut up fruit such as pears, nectarines, peaches, cantaloupe, mangos, bananas, and strawberries. Place them in a single layer on a cookie tray lined with plastic wrap and freeze. Once frozen, transfer to a Ziploc bag and keep frozen until ready to use.


 

When Life Gives You Lemons, Make Lemonade

 

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Every summer the best of American capitalism is reborn when our children set up shop to sell lemonade. These youthful entrepreneurs seem to catch on to the spirit of things by the ripe old age somewhere not quite ready for their Bar/Bat Mitzvah. It bodes well for their future, and ours too.

My own daughter Gillian was 11 years old when she and her friend Dana established their lemonade stand for the July 4th holiday one year. They wanted the best possible stuff, so they made real, from scratch lemonade rather than an instant drink made from packaged crystals.


 

Shavuot Non-Dairy Recipes

 

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When Tamar asked me what I wanted to write for Shavuot and if I ate dairy, I laughed and told her I don’t even have a dairy oven.  My family has all sorts of allergies and I am the Kosher Butcher’s Wife, dairy just doesn’t fit in.  How’s that for loyalty! As for Shavuot, every year our Rabbi stands up in shul and says, “Although dairy should be eaten on Shavuot, we must remember that it is Yomtov and we need to eat meat on a Yomtov, and by the way, this statement wasn’t sponsored by the butchers in our community!!” However, I do make cheesecake (in my mother in law’s oven) for the two of us.  She lives on our property so it’s convenient when I’m craving a slice of cheesecake.   I also make her batches of macaroni cheese which she always says is the best thing since cheesecake!!  But since my specialty is meat and parve, here are two non-dairy dishes that will satisfy even the chesiest among us.

When I think ”pasta’ somehow I picture a lovely macaroni cheese, or Fetuccine Alfredo, always a creamy, cheesey, dairy dish.  Well, this flavoursome, non-dairy creamy pasta has all the taste with the added bonus of being able to serve it as a main meal or a side dish to meat.

Non Dairy Creamy Pasta


 

Hot Dog and Hamburger Toppers

 

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There are so many creative ways to doctor up the regular old burgers and hot dogs.  We love toppings, anything from flavorful sauces to crispy onions are favorites around here.  Keep the burgers or hot dogs simple and then make it extra special with one of these fun toppings.


 

10 Light Summer Pasta Dishes

 

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Pasta is delicious and comforting food any time of year.  In the winter we go hearty with pumpkin and heavy cream sauces, but in the Summer we like to lighten it up with fresh tomatoes and basil, extra veggies and pesto.   Chavi Sperber shares her recipes for Linguine Grilled Summer Vegetable Salad and an all vegetable Zucchini Spaghetti Pasta Salad in our Summer issue of JoyofKosher.  We have so many more ideas here online.


 

Helpful Hints for Great Salads

 

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When Spring has finally sprung, and the farmers’ markets are bursting with the season’s new bounty, there is no better time to refresh our salad making skills.  It’s time to get creative and gear up for the fresh flavors that we would love to grace our tables!   Salad-making may involve little to no actual cooking, but there is quite a bit involved to making a good salad great. Read on for hints and tips toward creating memorable salads your family and guests will love!

Helpful Hints for Great Salads!


 

In Season: English Peas

 

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Spring produce season doesn’t really kick off for me until I see the sprightly-green shelling peas at the farmer’s market. Piled high and begging to be plucked from their pods and nibbled, I love that table, groaning with possibilities. Ah, sweet, sweet English peas.


 

Strawberry Frozen Yogurt

 

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I am so happy to make an appearance here at JoyofKosher.com. I am so honored to be asked by the loyal and friendly staff of Joy of Kosher to develop a recipe for Shavuot, along with my photographs.  Thank you from the bottom of my heart for this wonderful opportunity to connect with your readers!

As Jonathan and I were heading up to Massachusetts last month for Passover, I asked him what was his favorite ice cream? He responded ‘not ice cream, but frozen yogurt is my favorite’, which completely took me by surprise.  When I thought about it a tad longer it all made complete sense.  During his undergraduate days at Tel Aviv University, his barren refrigerator would always be graced by a couple of family size containers of a strawberry yogurt drink, called Prili (fruit-for-me). He would have one family size Prili for breakfast every day. He would shake it first before removing the aluminum top. When I saw early strawberries popping up here and there at the farmers markets recently, I couldn’t resist getting a couple of pints to make a Frozen Strawberry Yogurt dessert to celebrate Shavuot, inspired by Jonathan’s love for Prili.


 

Ingredient Spotlight: 3 Parsley Recipes

 

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Parsley is the Rodney Dangerfield of herbs. It gets no respect. It’s because parsley is common and so we take it for granted. But apples are common too. And so are lemons and carrots, but people don’t pass these up like they do parsley.  I’m just saying.


 

Barley Recipes To Celebrate History

 

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In modernity, after the destruction of the second Temple, the food most associated with Passover is matzah.  However, Passover was originally known as Hag Ha-Aviv (the holiday of spring) and it was connected to the beginning of the barley harvest.  The newly harvested barley could not be eaten until after the first sheaves of grain were offered to the Priests the second day of Pesach. The word Omer means “a measure or portion” (referring to the grain), and the Counting of the days of the Omer, in biblical times, coincided with the time period between the barley harvest and the harvesting of the first spring wheat, traditionally when Shavuot was celebrated.

The Romans and Greeks in ancient times prayed to their Goddesses of grain for a productive harvest.  The Jews, however, prayed to God to watch over the crops during the typical windy season in Israel.  A northern wind could bring rains that would destroy the new barley crop and a southern, hot, wind could stop the growth of the new wheat before it was to be harvested.  Barley was the mainstay of the Jew’s diet in biblical times because it was a very adaptable plant to cultivate in the different climates of Israel and very resistant to the dry desert heat.


 

10 Chicken Recipes That Reheat Well

 

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This time of year it is a challenge to find recipes that won’t be dry and tasteless by the time everyone comes back from Shul on Friday night.   Chicken being the most budget friendly can easily dry out, but there are some recipes that hold up better than others.  In general saucy chickens with or without the bones can stay pretty moist as long as they don’t lose their liquid, so add a little extra and don’t let it heat at too a high a temperature.  Breaded, fried or baked, chicken usually does pretty well too, the coating helps lock in the moisture and it is still very good if you have to serve it room temperature.   Here are ten  chicken recipes that would be perfect for a late Friday night or any weekday dinner.

Apricot Chicken Tajine


 

Smokin’ Recipes For a Spring Barbecue

 

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With Passover a wonderful memory and your matzo coma beginning to wane, you must be ready for a dish that has no resemblance to anything you might have eaten throughout the holiday.  It’s time to put away your braising pot, toss your oven mitts to the side and retire your roasting pan at least for the week. The following are some wonderful dishes that sing spring and wake up your taste buds to the promise of a new season.

Pineapple Mango Chutney


 

Cheesey Matzah Dishes

 

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Just because it’s Pesach does not mean that we cannot have lasagna or pizza – it just means we have to make them differently. Using matzah instead of noodles or pizza dough is a genius idea – I have tasted some Matzah Lasagnas and Pizzas that are out of this world. How do you use matzah to replicate chametz dishes?

Enjoy these recipes: