Food Holiday

 

National Peanut Cluster Day

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

Today’s food holiday celebrates the Peanut Cluster, a type of candy that combines peanuts and chocolate. Delicious!

Five Fun Facts:


 

National Cereal Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

A breakfast cereal is a food made from processed grains that is often, but not always, eaten with the first meal of the day. It is often eaten cold, usually mixed with milk or yogurt, and sometimes fruit, but may be eaten dry. Some companies promote their products for the health benefits from eating oat-based and high-fiber cereals. Cereals may be fortified with vitamins. Some cereals are made with high sugar content, with themes like Spider-Man, Disney Princesses, Barbie dolls, and SpongeBob, giving away free gifts like pull-back cars, Top Trumps cards and plastic bracelets, to popularise them with children. A healthy alternative to cereal would be Porridge, made by boiling oats with water or milk.

Five Fun Facts:


 

National White Chocolate Cheesecake Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

A Greek writer named Athenaeus recorded the oldest surviving cheesecake recipe. The ancient dessert called for just three ingredients—cheese, honey, and flour. Despite its simplicity, the Greeks believed that cheesecake had special powers. Brides and grooms ate it as wedding cake, and athletes enjoyed it before the first Olympic games in 776 BCE!

The cheesecake we know and love today relies heavily on cream cheese, which wasn’t invented until the 1870s. By the early 1900s, cheesecake appeared on almost every restaurant menu in New York City and soon became a nationwide sensation. People love to experiment with interesting cheesecake flavors like piña colada, turtle, pumpkin, pecan, crème brûlée, red velvet, and of course, white chocolate.


 

National Cold Cuts Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Cold cuts are precooked sausages or meat loaves that are usually served cold in sandwiches or on party trays.  You can buy them already sliced in vacuum packs, or have them sliced to order at a deli counter.  Most cold cuts are high in fat and sodium.

Five Fun Facts:


 

National Pound Cake Day

 

Contributed by:

 

1 comment | Leave Comment

 

Pound cake refers to a type of cake traditionally made with a pound of each of four ingredients: flour, butter, eggs, and sugar. The traditional recipe makes a cake much larger than most families can consume, and so the quantity is often changed to suit the size of the cake that is desired. As long as the ratio is preserved, the resulting cake will be identical to that using the traditional recipe. Hence, any cake made with a 1:1:1:1 ratio of flour, butter, eggs, and sugar is also called a pound cake.

There are numerous variations on the traditional pound cake, with certain countries and regions having distinctive styles. These can include the addition of flavoring agents (such as vanilla extract or almond extract) or dried fruit (such as currants or dried cranberries), as well as alterations to the original recipe to change the characteristics of the resulting pound cake.


 

National Banana Cream Pie Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

A cream pie is a type of pie filled with a rich custard or pudding that is made from milk, cream, flour, and eggs. It comes in many forms, including vanilla, lemon, lime, peanut butter, banana, coconut, and chocolate. A constant feature of all cream pies is the whipped cream topping. The custard filling is related to the French crème patissière which is a key component of various French cakes and tart. It is a one-crust pie.

Five Fun Facts:


 

National Fruit Compote Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Compote (French for “mixture”) is a dessert originating from 17th century France made of whole or pieces of fruit in sugar syrup. Whole fruits are immersed in water and with sugar and spices added to the dish, over gentle heat. The syrup may be seasoned with vanilla, lemon or orange peel, cinnamon sticks or powder, cloves, ground almonds, grated coconut, candied fruit, or raisins. The compote is then served either warm or chilled arranged in a large fruit bowl or single-serve bowl for individual presentation. The dessert may be topped with whipped cream, cinnamon, or vanilla sugar. Other preparations consist of using dried fruits which have been soaked in water in which alcohol can be added, for example kirsch, or rum. Dried fruit compote is a common Passover food.

Five fun facts:


 

National Surf and Turf Day – The Kosher Way!

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Traditionally surf and turf is the serving of seafood and steak on the same plate – something forbidden by Jewish Dietary law. For our Kosher Surf and Turf we bring you a first course of mock crab cakes and mock crab salad and main course of steak recipes. See below.

Five fun facts:


 

National Chocolate Souffle Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Today, in honor of National Chocolate Souffle Day we are learning all about souffles. What is a souffle? A soufflé is a baked dish made basically of milk and eggs, to which separately beaten egg whites give it an airy lightness. The French it literally means “puffed-up”. Souffles can be any type of dish, from morning egg breakfasts, to desserts, entrees or whatever your culinary imagination can whip up. Many cooks believe that a souffle has to be handed very carefully and not wrestled out of the oven only to fall flat. It is the puffiness that really makes a souffle. So when your dish is done, gently set it on a rack and let it cool slightly.

Five Fun Facts:


 

National Strawberry Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

The garden strawberry is a hybrid species that is cultivated worldwide for its fruit, the strawberry. The fruit is widely appreciated for its characteristic aroma, bright red color, juicy texture, and sweetness. It is consumed in large quantities, either fresh or in prepared foods such as preserves, fruit juice, pies, ice creams, and milkshakes. Artificial strawberry aroma is also widely used in many industrialized food products. The garden strawberry was first bred in Brittany, France, in the 1750s.

Five Fun Facts:


 

National Chili Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Chili is a stew-like soup made entirely with meat, chilies, or chili powder (or both) and according to what region of the United States that you live in, it can also include beans. “Con carne” means “with meat.”

The only thing certain about the origins of chili is that it did not originate in Mexico. Charles Ramsdell, a writer from San Antonio in an article called San Antonio: An Historical and Pictorial Guide, wrote: “Chili, as we know it in the U.S., cannot be found in Mexico today except in a few spots which cater to tourists. If chili had come from Mexico, it would still be there. For Mexicans, especially those of Indian ancestry, do not change their culinary customs from one generation, or even from one century, to another.”


 

National Tortilla Chip Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

The triangle shaped tortilla chip was popularized by Rebecca Webb Carranza as a way to make use of misshapen tortillas rejected from the automated tortilla manufacturing machine that she and her husband used at their Mexican delicatessen and tortilla factory in southwest Los Angeles. Carranza found that the discarded tortillas, cut into triangles and fried, were a popular snack, and she sold them for a dime a bag at the El Zarape Tortilla Factory. In 1994, Carranza received the Golden Tortilla award for her contribution to the Mexican food industry.

Five Fun Facts:


 

National Banana Bread Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Banana bread first became a standard feature of American cookbooks with the popularization of baking soda and baking powder in the 1930s, appeared in Pillsbury’s 1933 Balanced Recipes cookbook, and later gained more acceptance with the release of the original Chiquita Banana’s Recipe Book in 1950.The origin of the first banana bread recipe is unknown, though some speculate it was originated in the 18th century by housewives experimenting with pearlash. The home baking revival of the 1960s and the simplicity of its recipe led to an explosion in banana bread’s popularity.

Five fun facts:


 

National Cherry Pie Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Cherry pie is a pie baked with a cherry filling. Traditionally, cherry pie is made with tart rather than sweet cherries as it is easier to control how sweet the pie eventually becomes and also eventually translates to a sharper taste. Morello cherries are one of the most common kinds of cherry used, but others, like the native black cherry, are also occasionally utilized. Although generally eaten in North America, cherry pie is also known in other parts of the world. It is a very popular treat in North America and prior to the advent of refrigeration it was most commonly eaten in midsummer (harvest of cherries in North America coincides with Canada Day on July 1 and America’s Independence Day on July 4.) Cherry pie is also often eaten with whipped cream or ice cream. A common preparation tradition in the United States is to decorate the crust with fancy pastry patterns. (Wikipedia)

Five fun facts:


 

National Sticky Bun Day

 

Contributed by:

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

Sticky buns are a dessert or breakfast pastry that generally consist of rolled pieces of leavened dough — sometimes containing brown sugar or cinnamon — which are then compressed together to form a kind of flat loaf corresponding to the size of the baking pan. Before the dough is placed in the pan, the latter is lined with the “sticky” ingredients like maple syrup, honey (or both), as well as nuts and perhaps more sugar and sometimes butter. After the buns are baked, they are inverted so that the pan lining then becomes a topping. Commercially produced sticky buns, however, are usually just baked in an aluminum loaf tin, which allows the topping to suffuse the buns, making them sticky throughout. The way the buns were baked allows them to more or less be pulled off as individual servings, although it is often a futile effort. (Wikipedia)

Five fun facts: