Food Holiday

 

National Spinach Day

 

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Spinach is an edible flowering plant in the family of Amaranthaceae. It is native to central and southwestern Asia. It is an annual plant (rarely biennial), which grows to a height of up to 30 cm. Spinach may survive over winter in temperate regions. The leaves are alternate, simple, ovate to triangular-based, very variable in size from about 2–30 cm long and 1–15 cm broad, with larger leaves at the base of the plant and small leaves higher on the flowering stem. The flowers are inconspicuous, yellow-green, 3–4 mm diameter, maturing into a small, hard, dry, lumpy fruit cluster 5–10 mm across containing several seeds. (Wikipedia)

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National Pecan Day

 

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The history of pecans can be traced back to the 16th century. The only major tree nut that grows naturally in North America, the pecan is considered one of the most valuable North American nut species. The name “pecan” is a Native American word of Algonquin origin that was used to describe “all nuts requiring a stone to crack.”

Originating in central and eastern North America and the river valleys of Mexico, pecans were widely used by pre-colonial residents. Pecans were favored because they were accessible to waterways, easier to shell than other North American nut species and of course, for their great taste.


 

National Chip and Dip Day

 

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Chips and dip are the perfect snack duo for any occasion. Whether you prefer tortilla chips, potato chips, or pretzels, chances are that there is a delicious dip to complement it!

This appetizer may be prepared in advance for easy party planning. The recipes for chips and dip can also be easily expanded or shrunk depending on the number of people attending the party.


 

National Coq au Vin Day

 

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Coq is the French word for a “rooster”. Vin is French for “wine”. So that means that Coq au Vin translates as Rooster in Wine.

Until the 20th century it was common for rural families to have some chickens (for eggs and meat) and a rooster. The rooster would be kept until it was too old to perform its duties, at which time it would be killed and eaten. However, by this time the meat would be hard and stringy, so cooking it slowly in wine would tend to soften the meat and make it more edible. As such, the recipe has historically been considered “peasant food” or “poor people’s food” as the well-off would be able to afford a better cut of meat which would not require slow cooking in wine in order to be edible. These days the rooster is generally chicken or capon.


 

National French Bread Day

 

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French bread is also known as a”Baguette”. The word itself was not used to refer to a type of bread until apparently 1920, but what is now known as “baguette” may have existed well before that. Though the baguette today is often considered one of the symbols of French culture viewed from abroad, the association of France with long loaves predates any mention of it. Long, if wide, loaves had been made since the time of Louis XIV, long thin ones since the mid-eighteenth century and in fact by the nineteenth century some were far longer than the .

A less direct link can be made however with deck ovens, or steam ovens. Deck/steam ovens are a combination of a gas-fired traditional oven and a brick oven, a thick “deck” of stone or firebrick heated by natural gas instead of wood. The first steam oven was brought (in the early nineteenth century) to Paris by the Austrian officer August Zang, who also introduced the pain viennois (and the croissant) and whom some French sources thus credit with originating the baguette.


 

National Ravioli Day

 

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Ravioli (plural; singular: raviolo) are a traditional type of Italian filled pasta. They are composed of a filling sealed between two layers of thin egg pasta dough and are served either in broth or with a pasta sauce. The word ravioli is reminiscent of the Italian verb riavvolgere (“to wrap”), though the two words are not etymologically connected. The word may also be a diminutive of Italian dialectal rava, or turnip. (Wikipedia)

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National Poultry Day

 

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Poultry is defined as domestic fowl such as Turkey, Chicken, Duck and Geese that are raised for their eggs or for their meat. From the Old French word  pouletrie, from pouletier - poultry-dealer!

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National Oatmeal Cookie Day

 

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Oatmeal cookies first made an appearance during Rome’s attempts to conquer England. The English and the Scots carried oatmeal cakes in their saddlebags to provide quick energy during the conflict. The Romans scoffed at this practice, referring to the fact that oats were, at the time, intended only for consumption by horses. However, they soon realized that their rivals might be on to something as the conflict dragged on and on. Oatmeal cookies in various forms have been popular since that time.

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National Artichoke Hearts Day

 

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Native to the Mediterranean, the artichoke is the edible flower bud of a thistle-like plant in the sunflower family which is eaten as a vegetable. One plant can produce up to 30 chokes of different sizes. The edible buds have a slightly nutty-flavor. Once the flower matures, the artichoke becomes inedible so the buds are harvested by hand before flowering.

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National Pears Helene Day

 

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Pears Helene is a delicious French dessert made with sliced pears and various toppings such as cinnamon sugar, chocolate sauce, vanilla syrup, and ice cream.

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National Potato Chip Day

 

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Potato chips are a very popular snack. Potato chips were invented in 1853 by a Native American by the name of George Crum, who was a chef at a resort in Saratoga Springs, New York. A customer sent back his french-fried potatoes several times, saying they were too thick. Annoyed, George Crum cut the potatoes as thinly as possible, and thus the potato chip was born. The thin, fried potatoes were known as Saratoga Chips.

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National Coconut Torte Day

 

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Are you aware what the difference is between a tart and a torte? A torte has minimal to no flour, whereas a tart generally has a flour based crust.

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National Baked Fish Day

 

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It is actually Baked Scallops Day, but scallops are not kosher. So we have renamed the National Food Holiday today as National Baked Fish Day.

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National Eat Your Noodles Day

 

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The noodle is a type of staple food made from some type of unleavened dough which is rolled flat and cut into one of a variety of shapes. While long thin strips may be the most common, many varieties of noodles are cut into waves, helices, tubes, strings, shells, folded over, or cut into other shapes. Noodles are usually cooked in boiling water, sometimes with cooking oil or salt added, but are often pan fried or deep fried. Noodles can be refrigerated for short-term storage, or dried and stored for future use.

In English usage, the word “noodle” is an inclusive term that denotes texture and culinary use, and to a lesser extent, shape, as many people may associate it with the more common string varieties, such as spaghetti or ramen. Material composition or geocultural origin must usually be specified. However, the actual word derives from the German language Nudel (noodle). (Wikipedia)


 

National Mock Crabmeat Day

 

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Crab sticks are made of  finely pulverized white fish flesh (surimi), shaped and cured to resemble crab leg meat.

Pollock from the North Pacific is commonly the main ingredient, often mixed with egg white (albumen) or other binding ingredient. Artificial flavouring is added, and a layer of red food colouring is applied to the outside.