Food Holiday

 

National Zucchini Bread Day

 

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April 25th is National Zucchini Bread Day.  Zucchini Bread sometimes made into zucchini muffins is a savory and sweet quick bread that is easy to make and a great way to use extra zucchini.   It is the perfect bread to serve with any meal.  It can be made sweeter and even served for dessert.  It is a wonderful breakfast and a great way to get added vegetables in any time of day.

Zucchini also called Corguettes is a type of summer squash that is in season between May and July, when it is at its peak. You can go find some at your store right now to celebrate this day, but you can also bookmark this article for July when the stores are practically giving the zucchini away.  Zucchini Bread for everyone!


 

National Upside Down Pineapple Cake Day

 

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An upside-down cake is a cake usually made in a pan with a curved bottom. Once cooked, turned over and allowed to set, the cake is eaten upside-down. Usually, chopped fruits such as apples, pineapples and cherries are placed at the bottom of the pan before the batter is poured in, so that they form a decorative topping once the cake is inverted.

Turning the cake upside-down is a critical process; if done improperly, part of it can remain attached to the pan, ruining the final product. To allow for an easier detachment, the bottom of the pan is usually covered with butter or sugar.


 

National Rice Ball Day

 

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Rice balls or “onigiri” are a Japanese food made from white rice formed into triangular or oval shapes and often wrapped in nori (seaweed). Traditionally, an onigiri is filled with pickled ume (umeboshi), salted salmon, katsuobushi, kombu, tarako, or any other salty or sour ingredient as a natural preservative. Because of the popularity of onigiri in Japan, most convenience stores stock their onigiri with various fillings and flavors. There are even specialized shops whose only products are onigiri for take out.

Five Fun Rice Facts:


 

National Animal Crackers Day

 

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Animal cracker refers to a particular type of small cracker or cookie baked in the shape of an animal, usually an animal one might see at a zoo or circus, such as a lion, tiger, bear, or elephant. The most common variety is light-colored and slightly sweet, but darker chocolate-flavored and colorful frosted varieties are also sold. Whereas animal crackers are made with a layered dough like crackers, they are sweet like cookies. Animal crackers are often sold in zoo or circus-themed packaging containing an assortment of animal shapes.

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National Cheese Ball Day

 

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Cheeseballs are small to medium sized deep fried balls coated with corn flour, refined flour or breadcrumbs and stuffed with cheese mixture. Cheese balls are the perfect item to be served as snacks as well as appetizers. Not only is the preparation of cheeseballs easy, but also quite quick. It is the best recipe which can be prepared within just a few minutes with nothing but cheese in store, whenever an unexpected guest drops in. The making of this snack item is quite pocket-friendly and can be served with tangy tomato sauce, chili sauce on any holiday, party or get-together. A typical cheese ball is crispy from outside while moist on the inside due to the cheese stuffing. Cheese balls taste great in every bite when the generously stuffed cheese inside melts into the mouth. These snacks become even yummier with the addition of a pinch of seasonings like pepper and herbs like oregano.

Five Fun Facts:


 

Day of the Mushroom

 

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Mushrooms are of the fungi family subdivision of Basidiomycotina, of the class Hymenomycetes. The word mushroom is derived from the Gallo-Roman mussiro which evolved to mussereroun in Middle English.

There are so many varieties of mushrooms, both edible and toxic, that mass consumption is pretty much limited to those commercially-grown varieties which can be trusted to be edible.


 

National Caramel Day

 

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Caramel is a beige to dark-brown confectionery product made by heating any of a variety of sugars. It is used as a flavoring in puddings and desserts, as a filling in bonbons, and as a topping for ice cream, custard and coffee.

The process of caramelization consists of heating sugar slowly to around 170 °C (340 °F). As the sugar heats, the molecules break down and re-form into compounds with a characteristic color and flavor.


 

National Cordon Bleu Day – Kosher Style

 

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Chicken Cordon Bleu is a relatively recent American creation, drawing upon techniques from both Chicken Kiev and similar schnitzel dishes. The earliest reference to “Chicken Cordon Bleu” in The New York Times is dated to 1967, while similar veal recipes are found from at least 1955. The French term Cordon Bleu is translated as “Blue Ribbon”.The chicken dish should not be confused with the cooking school of the same name. It is traditionally made with chicken, wrapped around ham and cheese, but there are many kosher versions that circumvent this. See below.

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National Chocolate Mousse Day

 

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A mousse is a prepared food that incorporates air bubbles to give it a light and airy texture. It can range from light and fluffy to creamy and thick, depending on preparation techniques. Dessert mousses are typically made with whipped egg whites or whipped cream, and generally flavored with chocolate or puréed fruit.

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National Peanut Butter and Jelly Day

 

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It is said that the US Military is responsible for the creation of the peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Both peanut butter and jelly were on the U.S. Military ration menus in World War II (1941-1945).  American soldiers added jelly to their peanut butter to make it more palatable. Peanut butter provided an inexpensive and high protein alternative to meat for soldiers. It was an instant hit and returning servicemen made peanut butter and jelly sales soar in the United States. Food historians haven’t found any ads or other mentions of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches before the 1940s.

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National Sourdough Bread Day

 

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Sourdough is a dough containing a culture, usually in symbiotic combination with yeasts. It is one of two principal means of biological leavening in bread baking, along with the use of cultivated forms of yeast. It is of particular importance in baking rye-based breads, where yeast does not produce comparable results. In comparison with yeast-based breads, it produces a distinctively tangy or sour taste, mainly because of the lactic acid produced by the culture. The actual medium, known as “starter”, is in essence an ancestral form of pre-ferment.

In English-speaking countries, where wheat-based breads predominate, sourdough is no longer the standard method for bread leavening. It was gradually replaced, first by the use of barm from beermaking, then, after the confirmation of germ theory by Louis Pasteur, by cultured yeasts. However, some form of natural leaven is still used by many specialty bakeries.


 

National Turkey Neck Soup Day

 

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Whenever I make a chicken soup I love to put a turkey neck in it to add some flavoring. When the soup is cooked I will remove the turkey neck and take the meat of the bones and eat it. In honor of National Turkey Neck Soup Day boil up some chicken soup (recipes below), add a turkey neck and enjoy!

Five Fun Turkey Facts:


 

National Lemon Chiffon Cake Day

 

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A chiffon cake is a very light cake made with vegetable oil, eggs, sugar, flour, baking powder, and flavorings. It is a combination of both batter and foam type cakes. In contrast to butter, the traditional fat used in cake making, it is difficult to beat air into oil, so chiffon cakes, like angel cakes and other foam cakes, achieve a fluffy texture by beating egg whites until stiff, and folding them into the cake batter before baking. Its aeration properties rely on both the quality of the meringue and the chemical leaveners. Its oil-based batter is initially blended before folding into the meringue. (Wikipedia)

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National Food On a Stick Day

 

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We seem to be drawn to food on a stick – maybe because eating with our hands is so much fun, if a little messy? Kebabs, marshmallows, satay or even desserts – your options are endless.

Five Fun Foods On a Stick Ideas:


 

National Kosher Paella Day

 

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Paella is a Valencian rice dish that originated in its modern form in the mid-19th century near lake Albufera, a lagoon in Valencia, on the east coast of Spain. Many non-Spaniards view paella as Spain’s national dish, but most Spaniards consider it to be a regional Valencian dish. Valencians, in turn, regard paella as one of their identifying symbols.

There are three widely known types of paella: Valencian paella, seafood paella and mixed paella , but there are many others as well. Traditionally Valencian paella consists of white rice, green vegetables, meat (rabbit, chicken, duck), land snails – not kosher, beans and seasoning. Seafood paella replaces meat and snails with seafood and omits beans and green vegetables. Mixed paella is a free-style combination of meat, seafood (kosher dishes cannot mix fish and meat), vegetables, and sometimes beans. Other key ingredients include saffron and olive oil.