• Email
  • Pin It
 

National Eat Your Noodles Day

 

Contributed by:

 

 

0 comments | Leave Comment

 

The noodle is a type of staple food made from some type of unleavened dough which is rolled flat and cut into one of a variety of shapes. While long thin strips may be the most common, many varieties of noodles are cut into waves, helices, tubes, strings, shells, folded over, or cut into other shapes. Noodles are usually cooked in boiling water, sometimes with cooking oil or salt added, but are often pan fried or deep fried. Noodles can be refrigerated for short-term storage, or dried and stored for future use.

In English usage, the word “noodle” is an inclusive term that denotes texture and culinary use, and to a lesser extent, shape, as many people may associate it with the more common string varieties, such as spaghetti or ramen. Material composition or geocultural origin must usually be specified. However, the actual word derives from the German language Nudel (noodle). (Wikipedia)

Five Fun Facts:

  1. Christopher Columbus, one of Italy’s most famous pastaphiles, was born in October, National Pasta Month.
  2. Legend has it that noodles were first made by 13th century German bakers who fashioned dough into symbolic shapes, such as swords, birds and stars, which were baked and served as bread. In the 13th century, the Pope set quality standards for pasta.
  3. Most pasta is made using wheat products mixed with water.  Other types of pasta are made using ingredients such as rice, barley, corn, and beans.
  4. Egg noodles contain egg; almost all other dry pasta shapes do not. By federal law, a noodle must contain 5.5 percent egg solids to be called a noodle. So without egg, a noodle really isn’t a noodle.
  5. Cooked al dente (al-DEN-tay) literally means “to the tooth,” which is how to test pasta to see if it is properly cooked. The pasta should be a bit firm, offering some resistance to the tooth, but tender.

Five Noodle Recipes:

  1. Beef Sukiyaki with Noodles  - This recipe is adapted from Food & Wine magazine. It called for sake, a traditional Japanese wine fermented from rice, I substituted white wine, as it is hard to find kosher sake.
  2. Sea Bass With Soba Noodles and Sake-Soy Sauce- Each serving is wrapped up in parchment paper so when diners untie it, they are met with a burst of aromas and textures.
  3. Peanut Noodles with Shredded Chicken & Vegetables- These Peanut Noodles with Shredded Chicken & Vegetables make a simple and fun dinner your whole family can enjoy! If you can’t find a bagged vegetable medley for this easy noodle bowl, choose 12 ounces of cut vegetables from your market’s salad bar and create your own mix.
  4. Elegant Sweet and Peppery Noodle Kugel - This sweet and peppery noodle kugel has it all! 1. It’s super easy. You don’t even cook the noodles before assembling! 2. It looks so elegant when prepared in a fluted bundt pan. It makes a stunning table presentation, and remember – people eat with their EYES. 3. The taste is out of this world. Creamy, sweet, but with a peppery kick that makes it unique.
  5. Elise’s Sesame Noodles - Restaurant-style sesame noodles made fresh at home; nothing could be easier.

Click for more noodle recipes.

Nutrition Information per one cup of Chinese Chow Mein Noodles:

Calories:   237
Fat: 14 g
Carbohydrates: 26  g
Cholesterol: 0 mg
Sodium: 198 mg
Protein:  4 g
Sugars:  0.12 g

Posted in

Tags

About Hadassah Sabo Milner

avatar

HaDassah Sabo Milner is a Welsh Jew who lives in Monsey NY. She is a writer and a blogger and a lifelong foodie. She's married with four sons who provide her with much fodder for her writing projects. HaDassah is also a social media rockstar who can update multiple platforms simultaneously whilst cooking Shabbat dinner for 70. You can find her on Facebook, Twitter Twittr , and read her blog In The Pink .

Leave a Reply

Log in or Join For Free or leave a reply as a guest
Login



Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

  Notify me of follow-up comments by email