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Purim Recipes – Treats Beyond Belief

 

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Purim for me elicits many colorful and joyful memories, but none as strong as the faces of happy children with their mishloach manot, “goodie” baskets traditionally given to friends and family for this holiday. In the Sephardic tradition, the delivery of mishloach manot by children parallels a custom in Chinese culture for Chinese new year; upon receiving their baskets, the recipients shower the lucky curriers with coins!

Depending on your family customs, Purim baskets may contain any number of different things. Halakha dictates that the items given must be portable, and that the package must contain two different types of food. Fruits and nuts are popular items, of course, but, these days, anything goes! Depending on your tradition (or your predisposition for culinary adventures), these mishloach manot can span the spectrum of simple to gourmet, and everything in between. An Ashkenazi must-have is Hamantaschen, filled, triangular cookies, while Sephardim enjoy baklava, Orejas de Haman, and even burekas. While it’s best to fill your baskets with your tried and true family favorites, it’s always fun to add a little zest of something new. Why not give some of these festive, non-traditional items a try?

Chocolate Peanut Butter Balls

Amazing Technicolor Dream Cakes

Sweet and Savory Honey Goat Cheese Apple Turnovers 

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About Allaya Fleischer

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Born in Bangkok, Thailand, Allaya is a kosher chef and food writer specializing in Pan-Asian, and Asian fusion cuisines, who draws from her experiences living and traveling internationally, as well as the diverse friendships she's made throughout the years.  She is also an avid baker of artisan-style bread from around the world. Read Allaya's blog - I speak food  Allaya is a frequent contributer to Bitayavon Magazine, as well as other printed and electronic publications.

 

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4 Responses to Purim Recipes – Treats Beyond Belief

  1. These are some great ideas Allaya, how would you suggest packaging them? Do the balls need to stay cold?

  2. I think parchment paper cut with pinking shears with a pretty ribbon would look pretty for the peanut butter balls and turnovers. Cellophane bags would also look really nice for the cupcakes and turnovers. The peanut butter balls can go without refrigeration, but I prefer eating them cold. Everything else is fine at room temp for a good length of time. I like the turnovers toasted slightly, but they taste just as good not toasted. :)

    Also, I see I forgot to mention in the peanut butter balls recipe that the consistency of the balls largely depends on the moisture/oil content in the peanut butter and margarine you use (if you’re using margarine, that is). If you find it too difficult to work with, add more confectioner’s sugar.

  3. avatar says: LindaF

    Your cupcakes are an amazingly original idea for Purim. I’m sure that every child would want to make them. I’d plan on multiple batches because I’m not sure they would ever leave the house. Fantastic!

    The turnovers look yummy for any occasion.

  4. These cupcakes look yummy and gorgeous.
    For Purim I usually add a poem with a kick. I’m thinking about Amalek Kugel, a Parshas Zachor custom which could also go for Purim. Four kugels which equal the word Amalek in Yiddish. Not that I’m the sort of vulgar person who would use a response for garish self promotion, but I posted them on my blog kosherhomecooking.com but I wish I could present theme as nicely as you do. I could do different colored silver foil, but that isn’t available where I live. If anyone has a nice way to present kugels please post a tip.

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