Kosher Wine for Hanukkah

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Tamar Genger MA, RD
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The sun is setting and the Hanukkah lights are aglow.  The kids are quietly and patiently waiting to open their presents.   You have already cleaned up the dishes from dinner, wiped the splattered olive oil off the stovetop and are ready to sit back and relax.  Who am I kidding?  Hanukkah was never so simple!  Peeling, squeezing, slicing, dicing, frying, serving, cleaning.  Repeat.  Sound familiar?

It all looks so effortless on the plate.  The applesauce and sour cream have it easy.

Choosing the best kosher wine for Hanukkah can be easy, too.  This year I’ve got a few wines in mind that match up with my latkes and will still sparkle when it’s time to make the donuts.

Here are four to pour this Hanukkah:

2010 Bartenura Moscato Rose (Italy); $15.  This sparkling wine is a light rose color and a weekday friendly low alcohol content of only 7.5%, with a delicate fragrance and sweet taste.  It pairs well with fruit, cheeses and desserts.  It is best served chilled.

2010 Carmel Single Vineyard Riesling  (Galilee); $22.  An off dry white wine made from White Riesling grapes, grown in Kayoumi Vineyard, at an elevation of 780 meters above sea level in the shadow of Mount Meron. The wine is pale straw with tints of green, and has an aroma of blossoming citrus, green apple and lime, with a prominent and refreshing acidity.

2009 Alexander Syrah (Galilee); $36.  Deep red color with a shiny black tint.  Aromas and flavors of red and black berries, with black pepper and spice.  A long finish with excellent aging potential.  The wine was aged for 20 months in French oak barrels.

Adar de Elvi Cava Brut (Spain); $20.  Bubbly, and dry with flowers, citrus and strawberry notes on the palate. The dry white sparkling wine is a blend of three local grape varieties: Perellada, Macabeo and Xarel-lo. The second fermentation takes place in the bottle and the wines are aged for 12 months in the bottle.